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1156 records – page 1 of 116.

A 25-year follow-up of a population screened with faecal occult blood test in Finland.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature161415
Source
Acta Oncol. 2007;46(8):1103-6
Publication Type
Article
Date
2007
Author
Nea Malila
Matti Hakama
Eero Pukkala
Author Affiliation
Finnish Cancer Registry, Institute for Statistical and Epidemiological Cancer Research, Liisankatu 21 B, FI-001 70 Helsinki, Finland. nea.malila@cancer.fi
Source
Acta Oncol. 2007;46(8):1103-6
Date
2007
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Cohort Studies
Colorectal Neoplasms - diagnosis - epidemiology - mortality
Feasibility Studies
Female
Finland
Follow-Up Studies
Humans
Incidence
Male
Mass Screening - methods
Occult Blood
Patient compliance
Reagent kits, diagnostic
Sensitivity and specificity
Abstract
The aim of the study was to assess the feasibility of and possible selection to attend in colorectal cancer screening.
During the years 1979-1980, 1 785 men and women (born in 1917-1929) were invited to a pilot screening project for colorectal cancer. The screening method used was a guaiac-based faecal occult blood test repeated once if the initial test was positive.
Compliance was 69% and the test was positive in 19% of those attending. In a record linkage with the Finnish Cancer Registry, 47 colorectal cancer cases and 24 deaths from colorectal cancer were observed by the end of 2004. In all, the particular test method was not regarded specific enough for population screening. There was, however, no difference in cancer incidence between those who complied and those who did not when compared to the general population of same age and gender.
Compliance was found high enough to make screening feasible and there was no self selection of persons with low cancer risk to attend screening.
PubMed ID
17851857 View in PubMed
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25 years' experience with lymphangiomas in children.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature201178
Source
J Pediatr Surg. 1999 Jul;34(7):1164-8
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jul-1999
Author
A. Alqahtani
L T Nguyen
H. Flageole
K. Shaw
J M Laberge
Author Affiliation
The Montreal Children's Hospital, Department of Surgery, McGill University, Quebec, Canada.
Source
J Pediatr Surg. 1999 Jul;34(7):1164-8
Date
Jul-1999
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Abdominal Neoplasms - diagnosis - epidemiology - therapy
Adolescent
Age Distribution
Child
Child, Preschool
Evaluation Studies as Topic
Female
Head and Neck Neoplasms - diagnosis - epidemiology - therapy
Humans
Incidence
Infant, Newborn
Lymphangioma - diagnosis - epidemiology - therapy
Male
Mediastinal Neoplasms - diagnosis - epidemiology - therapy
Neoplasm Recurrence, Local - epidemiology - etiology
Pregnancy
Prognosis
Quebec - epidemiology
Retrospective Studies
Risk factors
Sex Distribution
Abstract
The management of lymphangioma in children is challenging because complete resection is difficult to achieve in some cases, and recurrences are common. The authors reviewed their experience to assess the risk factors for recurrence and the role of nonoperative treatment.
A retrospective study over a period of 25 years was carried out. One hundred eighty-six patients with 191 lesions (five patients with de novo lesions in different sites) were treated. There were 98 boys and 88 girls. The average age at diagnosis was 3.3 years (range, fetal life to 17 years) and the average size 8 cm in diameter. Histocytological confirmation was obtained in all patients. The involved sites were head and neck, 89 patients (48%); trunk and extremities, 78 patients (42%); internal or visceral locations (eg, abdominal and thorax), 19 patients (10%). The treatment consisted of macroscopically complete excision in 145 patients (150 lesions, of which five were recurrences in different sites), partial excision in 10 patients, aspiration in five patients, laser excision in 10 patients, biopsy only in four patients, drainage and biopsy in two patients, and injection of sclerosing agents in 10 patients.
There were 54 recurrences; 44 underwent excision (five of them more than once), and five regressed spontaneously on follow-up. Five other recurrences were stable and not progressing. Recurrences, (defined as clinically obvious disease), were found to be 100% after aspiration, 100% after injection, 40% after incomplete excision, 40% after laser excision, and 17% after macroscopically complete excision. The recurrence rate in the last group was the highest in the head (33%), the least in the internal locations (0%), and intermediate for the cervical location (13%). There were no significant differences, in terms of outcome, between those who had their surgery immediately at the time of diagnosis (n = 101) and those who had delayed surgery (n = 85).
There were fewer recurrences after macroscopically complete excision. Aspiration and injection had the highest recurrence rate. Risk factors for recurrence included location, size, and complexity of lesions. A period of observation may be useful for infants to facilitate complete excision. In the present series, spontaneous regression was infrequent and was seen more often with recurrent lesions.
PubMed ID
10442614 View in PubMed
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Abdominal symptoms and cancer in the abdomen: prospective cohort study in European primary care.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature303030
Source
Br J Gen Pract. 2018 05; 68(670):e301-e310
Publication Type
Journal Article
Date
05-2018
Author
Knut Holtedahl
Peter Hjertholm
Lars Borgquist
Gé A Donker
Frank Buntinx
David Weller
Tonje Braaten
Jörgen Månsson
Eva Lena Strandberg
Christine Campbell
Joke C Korevaar
Ranjan Parajuli
Author Affiliation
Department of Community Medicine, UiT The Arctic University of Norway, Norway.
Source
Br J Gen Pract. 2018 05; 68(670):e301-e310
Date
05-2018
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Keywords
Abdominal Neoplasms - diagnosis - epidemiology - pathology
Abdominal Pain - etiology - pathology
Adolescent
Adult
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Belgium - epidemiology
Denmark - epidemiology
Early Detection of Cancer
Female
Gastrointestinal Hemorrhage - etiology - pathology
Hematuria - etiology - pathology
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Netherlands - epidemiology
Norway - epidemiology
Primary Health Care
Prospective Studies
Referral and Consultation
Scotland - epidemiology
Sweden - epidemiology
Weight Loss
Young Adult
Abstract
Different abdominal symptoms may signal cancer, but their role is unclear.
To examine associations between abdominal symptoms and subsequent cancer diagnosed in the abdominal region.
Prospective cohort study comprising 493 GPs from surgeries in Norway, Denmark, Sweden, Scotland, Belgium, and the Netherlands.
Over a 10-day period, the GPs recorded consecutive consultations and noted: patients who presented with abdominal symptoms pre-specified on the registration form; additional data on non-specific symptoms; and features of the consultation. Eight months later, data on all cancer diagnoses among all study patients in the participating general practices were requested from the GPs.
Consultations with 61 802 patients were recorded and abdominal symptoms were documented in 6264 (10.1%) patients. Malignancy, both abdominal and non-abdominal, was subsequently diagnosed in 511 patients (0.8%). Among patients with a new cancer in the abdomen (n = 251), 175 (69.7%) were diagnosed within 180 days after consultation. In a multivariate model, the highest sex- and age-adjusted hazard ratio (HR) was for the single symptom of rectal bleeding (HR 19.1, 95% confidence interval = 8.7 to 41.7). Positive predictive values of >3% were found for macroscopic haematuria, rectal bleeding, and involuntary weight loss, with variations according to age and sex. The three symptoms relating to irregular bleeding had particularly high specificity in terms of colorectal, uterine, and bladder cancer.
A patient with undiagnosed cancer may present with symptoms or no symptoms. Irregular bleeding must always be explained. Abdominal pain occurs with all types of abdominal cancer and several symptoms may signal colorectal cancer. The findings are important as they influence how GPs think and act, and how they can contribute to an earlier diagnosis of cancer.
PubMed ID
29632003 View in PubMed
Less detail

Abdominal symptoms and cancer in the abdomen: prospective cohort study in European primary care.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature303215
Source
Br J Gen Pract. 2018 05; 68(670):e301-e310
Publication Type
Journal Article
Date
05-2018
Author
Knut Holtedahl
Peter Hjertholm
Lars Borgquist
Gé A Donker
Frank Buntinx
David Weller
Tonje Braaten
Jörgen Månsson
Eva Lena Strandberg
Christine Campbell
Joke C Korevaar
Ranjan Parajuli
Author Affiliation
Department of Community Medicine, UiT The Arctic University of Norway, Norway.
Source
Br J Gen Pract. 2018 05; 68(670):e301-e310
Date
05-2018
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Keywords
Abdominal Neoplasms - diagnosis - epidemiology - pathology
Abdominal Pain - etiology - pathology
Adolescent
Adult
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Belgium - epidemiology
Denmark - epidemiology
Early Detection of Cancer
Female
Gastrointestinal Hemorrhage - etiology - pathology
Hematuria - etiology - pathology
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Netherlands - epidemiology
Norway - epidemiology
Primary Health Care
Prospective Studies
Referral and Consultation
Scotland - epidemiology
Sweden - epidemiology
Weight Loss
Young Adult
Abstract
Different abdominal symptoms may signal cancer, but their role is unclear.
To examine associations between abdominal symptoms and subsequent cancer diagnosed in the abdominal region.
Prospective cohort study comprising 493 GPs from surgeries in Norway, Denmark, Sweden, Scotland, Belgium, and the Netherlands.
Over a 10-day period, the GPs recorded consecutive consultations and noted: patients who presented with abdominal symptoms pre-specified on the registration form; additional data on non-specific symptoms; and features of the consultation. Eight months later, data on all cancer diagnoses among all study patients in the participating general practices were requested from the GPs.
Consultations with 61 802 patients were recorded and abdominal symptoms were documented in 6264 (10.1%) patients. Malignancy, both abdominal and non-abdominal, was subsequently diagnosed in 511 patients (0.8%). Among patients with a new cancer in the abdomen (n = 251), 175 (69.7%) were diagnosed within 180 days after consultation. In a multivariate model, the highest sex- and age-adjusted hazard ratio (HR) was for the single symptom of rectal bleeding (HR 19.1, 95% confidence interval = 8.7 to 41.7). Positive predictive values of >3% were found for macroscopic haematuria, rectal bleeding, and involuntary weight loss, with variations according to age and sex. The three symptoms relating to irregular bleeding had particularly high specificity in terms of colorectal, uterine, and bladder cancer.
A patient with undiagnosed cancer may present with symptoms or no symptoms. Irregular bleeding must always be explained. Abdominal pain occurs with all types of abdominal cancer and several symptoms may signal colorectal cancer. The findings are important as they influence how GPs think and act, and how they can contribute to an earlier diagnosis of cancer.
PubMed ID
29632003 View in PubMed
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Accessibility to air travel correlates strongly with increasing melanoma incidence.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature16510
Source
Melanoma Res. 2006 Feb;16(1):77-81
Publication Type
Article
Date
Feb-2006
Author
Yolanda Z Agredano
Joanna L Chan
Ranch C Kimball
Alexa B Kimball
Author Affiliation
Department of Dermatology, Stanford University Medical Center, Stanford, California, USA.
Source
Melanoma Res. 2006 Feb;16(1):77-81
Date
Feb-2006
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aircraft
Comparative Study
Environmental Exposure - adverse effects
Holidays - statistics & numerical data
Humans
Incidence
Income - statistics & numerical data
Melanoma - diagnosis - epidemiology - etiology
Middle Aged
Norway - epidemiology
Skin Neoplasms - diagnosis - epidemiology - etiology
Sunlight
Travel - statistics & numerical data
Ultraviolet Rays - adverse effects
United States - epidemiology
Abstract
As the cost of air travel has decreased substantially in the USA and Europe over the past few decades, leisure travel to vacation destinations during the winter months has expanded significantly. This trend has probably increased the incidence of significant ultraviolet radiation exposure and sunburn in a broader population who could not previously afford this kind of travel. The purpose of this study was to analyse the correlation between increasing accessibility to air travel and melanoma incidence. This ecological study surveyed air travel patterns and melanoma incidence over the past three decades. Melanoma age-adjusted incidence was obtained from the United States Surveillance, Epidemiology, and End Results 9 Registry Database, 1975-2000, and the Cancer Registry of Norway, 1965-2000. United States mean inflation-adjusted airfare prices for four airports linked to leisure destinations (Miami, Los Angeles, San Diego, Phoenix) were compared with melanoma incidence. Parallel analyses were performed using annual domestic passenger-kilometres and melanoma incidence in Norway. Declining United States leisure-specific airfares corresponded strongly with increasing melanoma incidence (r = 0.96, r = 0.92, P
PubMed ID
16432460 View in PubMed
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[Access to Danish health care by immigrant women. Access to hospital care among immigrant women with breast cancer compared with Danish women]

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature20821
Source
Ugeskr Laeger. 1999 Aug 2;161(31):4385-8
Publication Type
Article
Date
Aug-2-1999
Author
M. Nørredam
A. Krasnik
J H Petersen
Author Affiliation
Afdeling for sundhedstjenesteforskning, Københavns Universitet.
Source
Ugeskr Laeger. 1999 Aug 2;161(31):4385-8
Date
Aug-2-1999
Language
Danish
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Aged
Breast Neoplasms - diagnosis - epidemiology - pathology
Comparative Study
Denmark - epidemiology - ethnology
Emigration and Immigration
English Abstract
Female
Health Services Accessibility
Humans
Mass Screening
Middle Aged
Neoplasm Staging
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Abstract
The study aim is to measure possible differences in access to health care among immigrant women with breast cancer compared with Danish women. We used tumour size at diagnosis as a proxy measure of access. The Danish Central Personal Register provided information from 1977-1996 on women between 20-75 years born in countries in which Islam is the dominating faith. These data were linked to the Danish Breast Cancer Cooperative Group, which registers data concerning tumour size. Sixty-five immigrant women with breast cancer were identified and matched with a control population of Danish women. The study showed larger tumours at diagnosis among women from ethnic minority groups compared to Danes. However, this tendency was not significant. Furthermore, mammographic screening had a significant effect on the tumour sizes of Danish women, but not on those of immigrants. The study indicates ethnic inequalities related to access to health services as measured by tumour size.
PubMed ID
10487101 View in PubMed
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Accuracy and false-positive rate of the cytologic diagnosis of follicular cervicitis: observations from the College of American Pathologists Pap Educational Program.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature112651
Source
Arch Pathol Lab Med. 2013 Jul;137(7):907-11
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jul-2013
Author
Manon Auger
Walid Khalbuss
Ritu Nayar
Chengquan Zhao
Patricia Wasserman
Rhona Souers
Nicole Thomas
Ann T Moriarty
Author Affiliation
Department of Pathology, McGill University and McGill University Health Center, Montreal, Quebec H3A 2B4, Canada.
Source
Arch Pathol Lab Med. 2013 Jul;137(7):907-11
Date
Jul-2013
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adenocarcinoma - diagnosis - epidemiology
Canada - epidemiology
Carcinoma, Squamous Cell - diagnosis - epidemiology
Cervical Intraepithelial Neoplasia - diagnosis - epidemiology
False Positive Reactions
Female
Humans
Papanicolaou test
Reproducibility of Results
Retrospective Studies
Societies, Medical
United States - epidemiology
Uterine Cervical Neoplasms - diagnosis - epidemiology
Uterine Cervicitis - diagnosis - epidemiology
Vaginal Smears - methods - standards
Abstract
Follicular cervicitis is usually easily identifiable on Papanicolaou (Pap) tests; however, historically, follicular cervicitis is reported to lead to false-positive diagnoses of epithelial cell abnormalities.
To assess participant responses in the College of American Pathologists (CAP) Pap educational program (CAP-PAP) to determine the accuracy and false-positive rate of follicular cervicitis cases. Design.-We performed a retrospective review of 4914 participant responses for gynecologic cytology challenges with the reference diagnosis of follicular cervicitis during 11 years (2000-2010) from CAP-PAP. Reference diagnosis category, false-positive rates by participant type (laboratory, cytotechnologist, pathologist), and preparation type (conventional smears, ThinPrep) were analyzed.
Of the total 4914 general category responses, 4368 (88.9%) were benign while 546 (11.1%) responses were epithelial cell abnormalities (false positives). Of benign responses, only 2026 (46.4%) were an exact match to follicular cervicitis. Adenocarcinoma and high-grade squamous intraepithelial lesion were the most common diagnoses chosen as a false-positive interpretation (42.3% and 20.1%, respectively). Participant type was significantly associated with false-positive interpretations (laboratory: 19.2%; cytotechnologist: 11.1%; pathologist: 7.9%; P
PubMed ID
23808462 View in PubMed
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Accuracy of HPV testing of vaginal smear obtained with a novel self-sampling device.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature79114
Source
Acta Obstet Gynecol Scand. 2007;86(1):16-21
Publication Type
Article
Date
2007
Author
Stenvall Harriet
Wikström Ingrid
Backlund Ingrid
Wilander Erik
Author Affiliation
Department of Genetics and Pathology, University Hospital of Uppsala, Sweden.
Source
Acta Obstet Gynecol Scand. 2007;86(1):16-21
Date
2007
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Cervical Intraepithelial Neoplasia - diagnosis - epidemiology - pathology - prevention & control - virology
DNA, Viral - analysis
Female
Humans
Mass Screening - methods
Middle Aged
Papillomaviridae - isolation & purification
Polymerase Chain Reaction
Predictive value of tests
Self Care
Sweden - epidemiology
Uterine Cervical Neoplasms - diagnosis - epidemiology - pathology - prevention & control - virology
Vaginal Smears - instrumentation
Abstract
BACKGROUND: Most of women diagnosed as having cervical cancer have not participated in organized cytological screening. Aim. A study was conducted to evaluate the accuracy of human papilloma virus testing by self-collected vaginal samples in comparison to regular cytological screening. The agreement of hybrid capture 2 assay and polymerase chain reaction assay for detection of human papilloma virus DNA in self-collected vaginal samples and clinician-obtained cervical smears was investigated. METHOD: Forty-three women aged 23-58 years admitted for further examination due to previous positive cytology in the organized screening participated in self-collecting of vaginal samples with a novel self-sampling device. During the visit a clinician also collected a cervical smear using a cytobrush. The vaginal samples collected with the self-sampling device were analyzed for high-risk human papilloma virus with the hybrid capture 2 assay technique and the cervical smears were Pap-stained, examined cytologically and after that reanalyzed for human papilloma virus DNA using a polymerase chain reaction assay. RESULT: The vaginal samples were positive for high-risk human papilloma virus in 37% of the cases using hybrid capture 2 assay. Twelve of the 43 Pap smears showed positive cytology (ASCUS-CIN 3), of which 4 showed CIN 2-3. When polymerase chain reaction assay was performed, human papilloma virus DNA was detected in 40% of the glass slides. The agreement between cytology and the two human papilloma virus testing techniques was 67-74% (kappa 0.27-0.45) and the agreement between the two human papilloma virus tests was 70% (kappa 0.36). CONCLUSION: Testing for high-risk human papilloma virus can identify more women at risk of developing cervical cancer than cytology irrespective of the sampling method. Furthermore, offering a self-sampling device for collection of vaginal smear seems to be a useful screening tool for cervical cancer among women not responding to an invitation for smear sampling.
PubMed ID
17230283 View in PubMed
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Accuracy of registration of invasive cervical cancer.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature241362
Source
Can Med Assoc J. 1983 Dec 15;129(12):1275-7
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-15-1983
Author
J A Husted
T W Anderson
R. Gallagher
Source
Can Med Assoc J. 1983 Dec 15;129(12):1275-7
Date
Dec-15-1983
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
British Columbia
Diagnostic Errors
Female
Humans
Middle Aged
Registries - standards
Uterine Cervical Neoplasms - diagnosis - epidemiology
Abstract
The quality of the data recorded by the British Columbia Cancer Registry for 521 new cases of invasive cervical cancer was evaluated. The registry's pathological diagnosis in all new registrations of invasive cervical cancer diagnosed in British Columbia between 1977 and 1979 was compared with a best estimate of the true diagnosis, which was determined from the results of the provincial cervical cytology screening program and the clinical charts at the Cancer Control Agency of British Columbia. The registry's data overestimated the true incidence of invasive cervical cancer by approximately 55%, since 184 (35%) of the cases were incorrectly registered. Of the 184, 141 (77%) were cases of preinvasive cervical cancer, 26 (14%) did not meet the criteria for a true case (i.e., they were not newly diagnosed in British Columbia between 1977 and 1979) and 17 (9%) were cases of invasive cancer of another primary site. In addition, 28 cases of invasive cervical cancer diagnosed in the province during the study period had not been reported to the registry. Thus, both over-reporting and under-reporting occurred. There is a need for constant evaluation of registry data if cancer registries are to fulfil their potential contribution to cancer control programs and research.
Notes
Cites: Lancet. 1978 May 13;1(8072):1031-276945
Cites: Lancet. 1978 Oct 7;2(8093):776-880696
Cites: Lancet. 1979 May 12;1(8124):103886760
Cites: Gynecol Oncol. 1979 Dec;8(3):311-6510997
Cites: Arch Geschwulstforsch. 1980;50(6):588-977224815
Cites: Gynecol Oncol. 1981 Oct;12(2 Pt 2):S143-557308854
Cites: Natl Cancer Inst Monogr. 1982;62:83-77167199
PubMed ID
6652593 View in PubMed
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[A comparison between mass screening for uterine neck cancer in the Districts of Frederiksberg and Maribo]

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature28349
Source
Nord Med. 1971 Dec 16;86(50):1534
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-16-1971

1156 records – page 1 of 116.