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988 records – page 1 of 99.

1,3-Butadiene: exposure estimation, hazard characterization, and exposure-response analysis.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature186649
Source
J Toxicol Environ Health B Crit Rev. 2003 Jan-Feb;6(1):55-83
Publication Type
Article
Author
K. Hughes
M E Meek
M. Walker
R. Beauchamp
Author Affiliation
Existing Substances Division, Environmental Health Directorate, Health Canada, Environmental Health Centre, Tunney's Pasture PL0802B1, Ottawa, Ontario, Canada K1A 0L2.
Source
J Toxicol Environ Health B Crit Rev. 2003 Jan-Feb;6(1):55-83
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Animals
Butadienes - metabolism - toxicity
Canada - epidemiology
Carcinogens, Environmental - toxicity
Environmental Exposure
Hazardous Substances - toxicity
Humans
Mutagens - toxicity
Neoplasms - chemically induced - epidemiology
Occupational Diseases - chemically induced - epidemiology
Risk assessment
Abstract
1,3-Butadiene has been assessed as a Priority Substance under the Canadian Environmental Protection Act. The general population in Canada is exposed to 1,3-butadiene primarily through ambient air. Inhaled 1,3-butadiene is carcinogenic in both mice and rats, inducing tumors at multiple sites at all concentrations tested in all identified studies. In addition, 1,3-butadiene is genotoxic in both somatic and germ cells of rodents. It also induces adverse effects in the reproductive organs of female mice at relatively low concentrations. The greater sensitivity in mice than in rats to induction of these effects by 1,3-butadiene is likely related to species differences in metabolism to active epoxide metabolites. Exposure to 1,3-butadiene in the occupational environment has been associated with the induction of leukemia; there is also some limited evidence that 1,3-butadiene is genotoxic in exposed workers. Therefore, in view of the weight of evidence of available epidemiological and toxicological data, 1,3-butadiene is considered highly likely to be carcinogenic, and likely to be genotoxic, in humans. Estimates of the potency of butadiene to induce cancer have been derived on the basis of both epidemiological investigation and bioassays in mice and rats. Potencies to induce ovarian effects have been estimated on the basis of studies in mice. Uncertainties have been delineated, and, while there are clear species differences in metabolism, estimates of potency to induce effects are considered justifiably conservative in view of the likely variability in metabolism across the population related to genetic polymorphism for enzymes for the critical metabolic pathway.
PubMed ID
12587254 View in PubMed
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2nd Nordic Toxicology Congress, NordTox-92. Symposium proceedings. Aland Islands, Finland, May 1992.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature24280
Source
Pharmacogenetics. 1992 Dec;2(6):245-349
Publication Type
Conference/Meeting Material
Article
Date
Dec-1992
Source
Pharmacogenetics. 1992 Dec;2(6):245-349
Date
Dec-1992
Language
English
Publication Type
Conference/Meeting Material
Article
Keywords
Carcinogens, Environmental
Environmental Exposure
Humans
Neoplasms - chemically induced
PubMed ID
1363969 View in PubMed
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3-Hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl coenzyme A reductase inhibitors and the risk of cancer: a nested case-control study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature197667
Source
Arch Intern Med. 2000 Aug 14-28;160(15):2363-8
Publication Type
Article
Author
L. Blais
A. Desgagné
J. LeLorier
Author Affiliation
Centre de Recherche, Hôtel-Dieu du CHUM, Saint-Urbain, Montreal, Quebec, Canada.
Source
Arch Intern Med. 2000 Aug 14-28;160(15):2363-8
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adverse Drug Reaction Reporting Systems
Aged
Cohort Studies
Female
Humans
Hydroxymethylglutaryl-CoA Reductase Inhibitors - adverse effects - therapeutic use
Hypolipidemic Agents - adverse effects - therapeutic use
Long-Term Care
Male
Neoplasms - chemically induced
Quebec
Risk
Abstract
During the past 15 years there has been an exponential increase in the number of prescriptions for lipid-lowering drugs. Uncertainties remain about the long-term impact of these medications on cancer, which is particularly bothersome given that the duration of these treatments may extend for several decades.
To explore the association between 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl coenzyme A (HMG-CoA) reductase inhibitors and cancer incidence.
Using the administrative health databases of the Régie de l'Assurance-Maladie du Québec we performed a nested case-control study. We selected a cohort of 6721 beneficiaries of the health care plan of Quebec who were free of cancer for at least 1 year at cohort entry, 65 years and older, and treated with lipid-modifying agents. Cohort members were selected between 1988 and 1994 and were followed up for a median period of 2.7 years. From the cohort, 542 cases of first malignant neoplasm were identified, and 5420 controls were randomly selected. Users of HMG-CoA reductase inhibitors were compared with users of bile acid-binding resins as to their risk of cancer. Specific cancer sites were also considered.
Users of HMG-CoA reductase inhibitors were found to be 28% less likely than users of bile acid-binding resins to be diagnosed as having any cancer (rate ratio, 0.72; 95% confidence interval, 0.57-0.92). All specific cancer sites under study were found to be not or inversely associated with the use of HMG-CoA reductase inhibitors.
The results of our study provide some degree of reassurance about the safety of HMG-CoA reductase inhibitors.
Notes
Comment In: Arch Intern Med. 2001 Jun 11;161(11):146011386902
PubMed ID
10927735 View in PubMed
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[10 Canadian cases of angiosarcoma of the liver in vinyl chloride workers].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature249144
Source
Ann Anat Pathol (Paris). 1978;23(2):97-104
Publication Type
Article
Date
1978
Author
F. Delorme
Source
Ann Anat Pathol (Paris). 1978;23(2):97-104
Date
1978
Language
French
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Environmental Exposure
Hemangiosarcoma - chemically induced - pathology
Humans
Liver - pathology
Liver Neoplasms - chemically induced - pathology
Male
Middle Aged
Occupational Diseases - chemically induced
Quebec
Vinyl Chloride - adverse effects
Vinyl Compounds - adverse effects
Abstract
Ten cases of angiosarcoma of the liver among vinyl chloride workers from a plant in Shawinigan, Québec, are reported. The author insist mostly on the occupational history of these workers and on the morphologic description of the lesions. A pathogenic hypothesis is submitted.
PubMed ID
567946 View in PubMed
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A 10-year follow-up of postmenopausal women on long-term continuous combined hormone replacement therapy: Update of safety and quality-of-life findings.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature80782
Source
J Br Menopause Soc. 2006 Sep;12(3):115-25
Publication Type
Article
Date
Sep-2006
Author
Heikkinen Jorma
Vaheri Raija
Timonen Ulla
Author Affiliation
The Deaconness Institute of Oulu, Isokatu, Oulu, Finland.
Source
J Br Menopause Soc. 2006 Sep;12(3):115-25
Date
Sep-2006
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Breast Neoplasms - chemically induced - epidemiology
Cerebrovascular Accident - chemically induced - epidemiology
Dose-Response Relationship, Drug
Endometrial Neoplasms - chemically induced - epidemiology
Estradiol - administration & dosage - adverse effects - analogs & derivatives
Estrogens, Conjugated (USP) - administration & dosage - adverse effects
Female
Finland
Follow-Up Studies
Hormone Replacement Therapy - adverse effects - psychology
Humans
Medroxyprogesterone 17-Acetate - administration & dosage - adverse effects
Middle Aged
Postmenopause - drug effects - physiology
Quality of Life
Treatment Outcome
Abstract
OBJECTIVE: To assess the safety and health-related quality of life (HRQOL) of continuous combined hormone replacement therapy (ccHRT) with estradiol valerate/medroxyprogesterone acetate (E(2)V/MPA) over nine years and at follow-up one year after discontinuation. Study design: A total of 419 women were randomized to one of four treatments: once-daily 1 mg E2V/2.5 mg MPA (1 + 2.5 group); 1 mg E2V/5 mg MPA daily (1 + 5 group); 2 mg E2V/2.5 mg MPA daily (2 + 2.5 group); 2 mg E2V/5 mg MPA daily (2 + 5 group) (Indivina, Orion Pharma). For the last six months, all received the 1 + 2.5 dosage. The 2 + 2.5 dosage was discontinued at the end of year 7. A total of 198 women continued after year 7. RESULTS: Annualized percentage rates for cardiovascular events [corrected] and endometrial cancers [corrected] were below national rates for Finland and those reported for the Women's Health Initiative. There were no serious events with the 1 + 2.5 dosage or after ccHRT discontinuation. Climacteric symptoms remained significantly below baseline values after dosage reduction; some symptoms recurred after discontinuation of ccHRT. HRQOL ratings improved with ccHRT, irrespective of dosage, including depressed mood, anxiety, health perception and sexual interest. Scores on a scale assessing daily functioning and enjoyment (Q-LES-Q) improved from year 7 to year 9. They deteriorated during follow-up in women not continuing ccHRT. CONCLUSIONS: Lower dosages of HRT were as effective as higher doses in improving climacteric symptoms and HRQOL ratings and had fewer safety concerns. Following discontinuation of ccHRT, patient satisfaction was variable, with 15% electing to continue or restart HRT and 7% resuming at follow-up. This supports the need for an individualized approach to therapy recommendations.
Notes
Erratum In: J Br Menopause Soc. 2006 Dec;12(4):174
PubMed ID
16953985 View in PubMed
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Absence of radiographic asbestosis and the risk of lung cancer among asbestos-cement workers: Extended follow-up of a cohort.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature141822
Source
Am J Ind Med. 2010 Nov;53(11):1065-9
Publication Type
Article
Date
Nov-2010
Author
Murray M Finkelstein
Author Affiliation
Department of Family and Community Medicine, University of Toronto, Ontario, Canada. murray.finkelstein@utoronto.ca
Source
Am J Ind Med. 2010 Nov;53(11):1065-9
Date
Nov-2010
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Aged
Asbestos - toxicity
Asbestosis - mortality - radiography
Canada - epidemiology
Construction Materials - toxicity
Follow-Up Studies
Humans
Lung Neoplasms - chemically induced - mortality
Male
Middle Aged
Occupational Exposure - adverse effects
Prospective Studies
Risk
Smoking
Time Factors
Abstract
It has been a matter of controversy whether there is an increased risk of lung cancer among asbestos-exposed workers without radiographic asbestosis. A previous study of lung cancer risk among asbestos-cement workers has been updated with an additional 12 years of follow-up.
Subjects had received radiographic examination at 20 and 25 years from first exposure to asbestos. Radiographs were interpreted by a single National Institute of Safety and Health (NIOSH)-certified B-reader using the 1971 International Labor Office (ILO) Classification of the pneumoconioses as reference standard. Asbestosis was defined as an ILO coding of 1/0 or higher. Standardized Mortality Ratios (SMRs) were calculated using the general population of Ontario as reference.
Among asbestos-cement workers without radiographic asbestosis at 20 years latency the lung cancer SMR was 3.84 (2.24-6.14). Among workers without asbestosis when examined at 25 years latency the SMR was 3.69 (1.59-7.26).
Workers from an Ontario asbestos-cement factory who did not have radiographic asbestosis at 20 or 25 years from first exposure to asbestos continued to have an increased risk of death from lung cancer during an additional 12 years of follow-up.
Notes
Comment In: Am J Ind Med. 2011 Jun;54(6):495-6; author reply 497-821328422
PubMed ID
20672325 View in PubMed
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Accumulated state of the Yukon River watershed: part I critical review of literature.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature121234
Source
Integr Environ Assess Manag. 2013 Jul;9(3):426-38
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jul-2013
Author
Monique G Dubé
Breda Muldoon
Julie Wilson
Karonhiakta'tie Bryan Maracle
Author Affiliation
Canadian Rivers Institute, University of New Brunswick, Alberta, Canada. Dub.mon@hotmail.com
Source
Integr Environ Assess Manag. 2013 Jul;9(3):426-38
Date
Jul-2013
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Alaska - epidemiology
Animal Migration
Animals
British Columbia - epidemiology
Climate change
Environment
Environmental Monitoring - methods
Fish Diseases - epidemiology - microbiology - parasitology
Fishes - physiology
Fresh Water - analysis - microbiology - parasitology
Humans
Neoplasms - chemically induced - epidemiology
Seasons
Water Movements
Water Pollutants, Chemical - analysis - metabolism - toxicity
Water Quality
Yukon Territory - epidemiology
Abstract
A consistent methodology for assessing the accumulating effects of natural and manmade change on riverine systems has not been developed for a whole host of reasons including a lack of data, disagreement over core elements to consider, and complexity. Accumulated state assessments of aquatic systems is an integral component of watershed cumulative effects assessment. The Yukon River is the largest free flowing river in the world and is the fourth largest drainage basin in North America, draining 855,000 km(2) in Canada and the United States. Because of its remote location, it is considered pristine but little is known about its cumulative state. This review identified 7 "hot spot" areas in the Yukon River Basin including Lake Laberge, Yukon River at Dawson City, the Charley and Yukon River confluence, Porcupine and Yukon River confluence, Yukon River at the Dalton Highway Bridge, Tolovana River near Tolovana, and Tanana River at Fairbanks. Climate change, natural stressors, and anthropogenic stresses have resulted in accumulating changes including measurable levels of contaminants in surface waters and fish tissues, fish and human disease, changes in surface hydrology, as well as shifts in biogeochemical loads. This article is the first integrated accumulated state assessment for the Yukon River basin based on a literature review. It is the first part of a 2-part series. The second article (Dubé et al. 2013a, this issue) is a quantitative accumulated state assessment of the Yukon River Basin where hot spots and hot moments are assessed outside of a "normal" range of variability.
PubMed ID
22927161 View in PubMed
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Accumulation of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) in an urban snowpack.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature232700
Source
Sci Total Environ. 1988 Aug 1;74:133-48
Publication Type
Article
Date
Aug-1-1988
Author
A. Boom
J. Marsalek
Author Affiliation
Department of Water pollution Control, Agricultural University, Wageningen, The Netherlands.
Source
Sci Total Environ. 1988 Aug 1;74:133-48
Date
Aug-1-1988
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Animals
Humans
Neoplasms - chemically induced
Ontario
Polycyclic Compounds - analysis - toxicity
Risk factors
Snow
Urban Population
Weather
Abstract
Accumulations of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons in a snowpack were studied in an industrial urban area with numerous anthropogenic sources of PAHs. Average PAH loadings stored in the snowpack were determined, plotted on a map of the study area, and arenal distribution approximated by isoloading contours. The loading contours exhibited a marked elongation in the direction of prevailing winds. The unit-area deposition rates observed in the study area exceeded the typical rates reported for other urban areas, and were the highest immediately downwind of a steel plant. PAH levels in snowmelt were well below the freshwater aquatic life toxicity criteria, but exceeded both the WHO drinking water standard and the U.S. EPA carcinogenic criteria at the 10(-5) risk level.
PubMed ID
3222690 View in PubMed
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Acrylamide and cancer: tunnel leak in Sweden prompted studies.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature19084
Source
J Natl Cancer Inst. 2002 Jun 19;94(12):876-8
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-19-2002

Acrylamide intake through diet and human cancer risk.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature92784
Source
J Agric Food Chem. 2008 Aug 13;56(15):6013-9
Publication Type
Article
Date
Aug-13-2008
Author
Mucci Lorelei A
Wilson Kathryn M
Author Affiliation
Channing Laboratory, Department of Medicine, Brigham and Women's Hospital and Harvard Medical School, 181 Longwood Avenue, Boston, Massachusetts 02115, USA. lmucci@hsph.harvard.edu
Source
J Agric Food Chem. 2008 Aug 13;56(15):6013-9
Date
Aug-13-2008
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Acrylamide - administration & dosage - analysis - toxicity
Adult
Animals
Body Weight
Breast Neoplasms - epidemiology
Child
Colorectal Neoplasms - epidemiology
Diet
Diet Records
Female
Food analysis
Humans
Kidney Neoplasms - epidemiology
Male
Models, Animal
Neoplasms - chemically induced - epidemiology
Risk factors
Sweden - epidemiology
Urinary Bladder Neoplasms - epidemiology
Abstract
More than one-third of the calories consumed by U.S. and European populations contain acrylamide, a substance classified as a "probable human carcinogen" based on laboratory data. Thus, it is a public health concern to evaluate whether intake of acrylamide at levels found in the food supply is an important cancer risk factor. Mean dietary intake of acrylamide in adults averages 0.5 microg/kg of body weight per day, whereas intake is higher among children. Several epidemiological studies examining the relationship between dietary intake of acrylamide and cancers of the colon, rectum, kidney, bladder, and breast have been undertaken. These studies found no association between intake of specific foods containing acrylamide and risk of these cancers. Moreover, there was no relationship between estimated acrylamide intake in the diet and cancer risk. Results of this research are compared with other epidemiological studies, and the findings are examined in the context of data from animal models. The importance of epidemiological studies to establish the public health risk associated with acrylamide in food is discussed, as are the limitations and future directions of such studies.
PubMed ID
18624443 View in PubMed
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988 records – page 1 of 99.