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187 records – page 1 of 19.

[15 years after the accident at the Chernobyl Nuclear Power Plant]

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature19138
Source
Radiats Biol Radioecol. 2002 Mar-Apr;42(2):228-33
Publication Type
Article
Author
L A Buldakov
A K Gus'kova
Author Affiliation
State Research Centre-Institute of Biophysics, Russian Ministry of Health, Moscow, 123182 Russia.
Source
Radiats Biol Radioecol. 2002 Mar-Apr;42(2):228-33
Language
Russian
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Accidents, Radiation
Adolescent
Adult
Age Factors
Byelarus - epidemiology
Child
Child, Preschool
Comparative Study
English Abstract
Female
Follow-Up Studies
Humans
Infant
Infant, Newborn
Male
Neoplasms, Radiation-Induced - epidemiology - etiology
Power Plants
Pregnancy
Prognosis
Radiation Dosage
Radiation Injuries - epidemiology
Risk factors
Russia - epidemiology
Thyroid Neoplasms - epidemiology - etiology
Time Factors
Ukraine - epidemiology
Abstract
Health effects as a result of the accident at the Chernobyl nuclear power plant occurred in 1986 are considered in the paper. Wrong prognosis of the health effects with respect to mortality and morbidity among the population exposed to low radiation doses is shown. Proven increase in thyroid cancer cases among people who were children aged from 0 to 18 at the time of the accident is shown. Linear relationship between thyroid cancer cases and dose to thyroid ranged from 0.2 to 4.0 Gy is considered. An additional absolute risk of thyroid cancer in children varies in the range 1.9-2.6 cases per 10(4) person-year Gy. During the fifteen years following the accident no cases of acute and chronic radiation sickness have been revealed because the population living in contaminated areas received low radiation doses. Also, exposures to low radiation doses did not result in excess of malignant tumors among population. In some cases the outcomes of acute radiation sickness were as follows: radiation damages to the skin, cancer cataracts, development of oncopathology.
PubMed ID
12004624 View in PubMed
Less detail

50-Hz electromagnetic environment and the incidence of childhood tumors in Stockholm County.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature26451
Source
Bioelectromagnetics. 1986;7(2):191-207
Publication Type
Article
Date
1986
Author
L. Tomenius
Source
Bioelectromagnetics. 1986;7(2):191-207
Date
1986
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Child
Child, Preschool
Electromagnetic fields - adverse effects
Electromagnetics - adverse effects
Environmental pollution
Female
Housing
Humans
Infant
Male
Neoplasms - classification - epidemiology
Neoplasms, Radiation-Induced - epidemiology - etiology
Registries
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Sweden
Urban Population
Abstract
The magnetic fields from overhead power lines and other electromagnetic sources were determined at the birth and diagnosis dwellings of all tumor cases reported in the county of Stockholm during the years 1958-73 for individuals 0-18 years of age. The study was limited to 716 cases having a permanent address in the county both at time of birth and diagnosis. An equivalent number of controls was matched to the cases according to church district of birth, age, and sex. Outside each dwelling, the occurrence of visible electrical constructions (6-200-kV high-voltage wires, substations, transformers, electric railroads, and subways) within 150 m of the dwelling was noted. Also, the 50-Hz magnetic field was measured outside the main entrance of the dwelling. Visible 200-kv wires were noted at 45 of 2,098 dwellings and were found twice as frequently among cases as among controls (P less than .05). The magnetic field measured at the dwelling varied between 0.0004 to 1.9 microT (mean value 0.069 microT). The magnetic field was higher (0.22 microT) at dwellings with visible 200-kV wires than at those without such wires. Magnetic fields of 0.3 microT or more were measured at 48 dwellings, and were found twice as frequently among cases as among controls (P less than .05). The difference was most pronounced for dwellings of nervous system tumors and was less for leukemias.
PubMed ID
3741493 View in PubMed
Less detail

131I ablation treatment in young females after the Chernobyl accident.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature80419
Source
J Nucl Med. 2006 Oct;47(10):1723-7
Publication Type
Article
Date
Oct-2006
Author
Travis Curtis C
Stabin Michael G
Author Affiliation
Science Applications International Corporation, Knoxville, Tennessee, USA. Traviscc@icx.net
Source
J Nucl Med. 2006 Oct;47(10):1723-7
Date
Oct-2006
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Accidents, Radiation
Adolescent
Adult
Breast Neoplasms - epidemiology - etiology
Chernobyl Nuclear Accident
Child
Female
Humans
Iodine Radioisotopes - adverse effects - therapeutic use
Neoplasms, Radiation-Induced - epidemiology - etiology
Power Plants
Radiotherapy - adverse effects
Thyroid Neoplasms - radiotherapy
Ukraine
Whole-Body Counting
Abstract
The Chernobyl accident resulted in a number of cases of thyroid cancer in females under the age of 20 y. Many of these individuals were treated with surgical removal of the thyroid gland followed by 131I ablation of residual thyroid tissue. Epidemiologic evidence demonstrates that 131I treatment for thyroid cancer or hyperthyroidism in adult women confers negligible risk of breast cancer. However, comparable data for younger women do not exist. Studies of external radiation exposure indicate that, for radiation exposures of as low as 0.2-0.7 Gy, the risk of breast cancer is greater for infant and adolescent female breast tissues than for adult female breast tissues. METHODS: The effective half-time of 131I measured in athyrotic patients was used together with the OLINDA/EXM computer code to estimate doses to breast tissue in 10-y-old, 15-y-old, and young adult females from ablation treatment. RESULTS: The dose to pediatric and young adult female breast tissue associated with a 5.6-GBq (150 mCi) ablation treatment may range from 0.35 to 0.55 Gy, resulting in a lifetime risk of breast cancer ranging from 2-4 cases per 100 such individuals exposed and a lifetime risk of solid tumors ranging from 8 to 17 solid tumors per 100 such individuals exposed. Administration of multiple ablation treatments, as often occurs with metastases, could result in doses ranging from 0.7 to 1 Gy, with corresponding increases in the lifetime cancer risk. CONCLUSION: These estimates suggest the need for additional research and a possible need for surveillance of young Chernobyl thyroid cancer patients who received 131I ablation treatment.
Notes
Comment In: J Nucl Med. 2006 Oct;47(10):1563-417015887
Erratum In: J Nucl Med. 2007 Jan;48(1):7
PubMed ID
17015910 View in PubMed
Less detail

[A certain increase of skin cancer among pilots].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature184428
Source
Lakartidningen. 2003 Jun 26;100(26-27):2297-9
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-26-2003
Author
Niklas Hammar
Harald Eliasch
Anette Linnersjö
Bo-Göran Dammström
Maritha Johansson
Eero Pukkala
Author Affiliation
Enheten för epidemiologi, Institutet för miljömedicin, Karolinska institutet, Stockholm. niklas.hammar@imm.ki.se
Source
Lakartidningen. 2003 Jun 26;100(26-27):2297-9
Date
Jun-26-2003
Language
Swedish
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aerospace Medicine - manpower
Aircraft
Cosmic Radiation - adverse effects
Humans
Incidence
Male
Melanoma - epidemiology - etiology
Neoplasms, Radiation-Induced - epidemiology - etiology
Occupational Exposure - adverse effects
Registries
Risk factors
Scandinavia - epidemiology
Skin Neoplasms - epidemiology - etiology
Notes
Comment In: Lakartidningen. 2003 Jun 26;100(26-27):2278-912872371
PubMed ID
12872376 View in PubMed
Less detail

Additional thyroid dose factor from transportation sources in Russia after the Chernobyl disaster.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature21799
Source
Environ Health Perspect. 1997 Dec;105 Suppl 6:1491-6
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-1997
Author
E M Parshkov
I V Chebotareva
V A Sokolov
C E Dallas
Author Affiliation
Medical Radiological Research Center of the Russian Academy of Medical Sciences, Obninsk, Kaluga Region, Russia. indep@mrrc.obninsk.su
Source
Environ Health Perspect. 1997 Dec;105 Suppl 6:1491-6
Date
Dec-1997
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Accidents, Radiation
Adolescent
Child
Child, Preschool
Comparative Study
Environmental Exposure - adverse effects
Humans
Incidence
Infant
Infant, Newborn
Neoplasms, Radiation-Induced - epidemiology - etiology
Power Plants
Railroads
Russia - epidemiology
Thyroid Neoplasms - epidemiology - etiology
Ukraine
Abstract
Beginning approximately 4 years after the Chernobyl nuclear accident a steady increase in the incidence of thyroid cancer was observed in children and adolescents of the Bryansk Oblast, which received the highest level of radionuclide contaminants in Russia. We examined the spatial relationship between the residence location of patients with identified thyroid cancer (0-18 years old at the time of the accident) and a number of geographic parameters to better account for the etiology of thyroid cancer spatial distribution. Geographic parameters analyzed included spatial distribution of 137Cs and 131I in soil, population demographics, measurements and reconstructions. of absorbed thyroid 131I doses in the population, and maps of major transportation arteries. An interesting finding is the lack of a consistent correlation between the spatial distribution of radionuclides in the soil and thyroid cancer incidence. Instead, most of the thyroid cancer cases were diagnosed in settlements situated on major railways and roads. Correlating population with thyroid cancer cases and transportation arteries reveals a much higher cancer rate on or near major roads and railways than at a distance from them, again independent of radionuclide soil concentration. There are other important factors, of course, that must be considered in future evaluations of this phenomenon. These include the influence of iodine endemic zones, genetic predisposition to thyroid cancer, and duration of residence time in contaminated areas. The feasibility of radionuclide transport on railways and roads is discussed, together with the vectors for transfer of the contaminants to the human population. Developing a model to reconstruct the radiation dose to the thyroid over time in this geographic region is proposed in light of the impact of transportation arteries. Specific studies are outlined to provide the data necessary to develop this model as well as to better characterize the feasibility and scientific validity of the contribution to human health effects of this transport factor. Transport factor refers to the transport of radionuclides on transportation arteries and the transfer of these agents to the human population residing in the vicinity of these arteries. If the impact on thyroid cancer of the transport of radionuclides on major railways and roads is indeed significant, a major reappraisal of the risk of large-scale radioactive release into the environment is necessary.
PubMed ID
9467070 View in PubMed
Less detail

An epidemiological overview of Chernobyl-related research.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature22297
Source
Stem Cells. 1997;15 Suppl 2:205-6
Publication Type
Article
Date
1997

[An evaluation of the role of radiation and nonradiation factors in the development of lung cancer in workers at a radiochemical enterprise (1)]

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature22926
Source
Ter Arkh. 1996;68(3):37-40
Publication Type
Article
Date
1996
Author
Z B Tokarskaia
N D Okladnikova
Z D Beliaeva
Source
Ter Arkh. 1996;68(3):37-40
Date
1996
Language
Russian
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aged
Case-Control Studies
Comparative Study
English Abstract
Female
Humans
Logistic Models
Lung Neoplasms - epidemiology - etiology
Male
Middle Aged
Neoplasms, Radiation-Induced - epidemiology - etiology
Occupational Diseases - epidemiology - etiology
Plutonium - adverse effects
Power Plants
Radiation Dosage
Risk factors
Siberia - epidemiology
Smoking - adverse effects - epidemiology
Abstract
A case-control study using logistic regression included 500 employees of the nuclear works (162 patients with lung carcinoma and 338 healthy controls). After examination of radiation and nonradiation causative factors 5 proved statistically significant. For them the following chance proportions were obtained: smoking 6.6, plutonium pneumosclerosis 4.6, plutonium incorporation 3.1, chronic nonspecific pulmonary diseases 2.1, external gamma-radiation 1.6. Attributive risk for the total of the radiation factors makes up 25% at the most while of the nonradiation factors at least 70%.
PubMed ID
8744101 View in PubMed
Less detail

An historical cohort study of cardiac catheterization during childhood and the risk of cancer.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature220620
Source
Int J Epidemiol. 1993 Aug;22(4):584-91
Publication Type
Article
Date
Aug-1993
Author
J R McLaughlin
N. Kreiger
M P Sloan
L N Benson
S. Hilditch
E A Clarke
Author Affiliation
Division of Epidemiology and Statistics, Ontario Cancer Treatment and Research Foundation, Toronto, Canada.
Source
Int J Epidemiol. 1993 Aug;22(4):584-91
Date
Aug-1993
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Age Factors
Cardiac Catheterization - adverse effects - methods
Child
Child, Preschool
Confidence Intervals
Female
Follow-Up Studies
Hospitals, Pediatric
Humans
Incidence
Infant
Infant, Newborn
Male
Medical Record Linkage
Neoplasms, Radiation-Induced - epidemiology - etiology - mortality
Ontario - epidemiology
Registries
Risk factors
Time Factors
Urban Population
Abstract
This study aimed to determine whether cancer risk was elevated among patients exposed to radiation from diagnostic cardiac catheterization during childhood. The study cohort included 3915 children who underwent at least one cardiac catheterization at a major children's hospital in Toronto, Canada, between 1950 and 1965, were
PubMed ID
8225729 View in PubMed
Less detail

[Assessment of the health of the salvaging personnel at the Chernobyl Nuclear Power Plant: findings of the Russian Federal Interdepartmental Expert Committee for 1999].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature195628
Source
Vopr Onkol. 2000;46(6):645-9
Publication Type
Article
Date
2000

187 records – page 1 of 19.