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987 records – page 1 of 99.

1H MRS studies in the Finnish boron neutron capture therapy project: detection of 10B-carrier, L-p-boronophenylalanine-fructose.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature172386
Source
Eur J Radiol. 2005 Nov;56(2):154-9
Publication Type
Article
Date
Nov-2005
Author
M. Timonen
L. Kankaanranta
N. Lundbom
J. Collan
A. Kangasmäki
M. Kortesniemi
A-M Häkkinen
A. Lönngren
S. Karjalainen
M. Rasilainen
J. Leinonen
T. Huitti
J. Jääskeläinen
M. Kouri
S. Savolainen
S. Heikkinen
Author Affiliation
Department of Physical Sciences, University of Helsinki, POB 64, FIN-00014, Helsinki, Finland.
Source
Eur J Radiol. 2005 Nov;56(2):154-9
Date
Nov-2005
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Aged
Boron - therapeutic use
Boron Compounds - analysis - blood
Boron Neutron Capture Therapy
Brain Neoplasms - pathology - radiotherapy
Carcinoma - pathology - radiotherapy
Female
Finland
Fructose - analogs & derivatives - analysis - blood
Glioblastoma - pathology - radiotherapy
Humans
Hydrogen
Isotopes - therapeutic use
Magnetic Resonance Spectroscopy - methods
Male
Neoplasm Recurrence, Local - pathology - radiotherapy
Paranasal Sinus Neoplasms - pathology - radiotherapy
Phantoms, Imaging
Plasma
Radiopharmaceuticals - therapeutic use
Abstract
This article summarizes the current status of 1H MRS in detecting and quantifying a boron neutron capture therapy (BNCT) boron carrier, L-p-boronophenylalanine-fructose (BPA-F) in vivo in the Finnish BNCT project. The applicability of 1H MRS to detect BPA-F is evaluated and discussed in a typical situation with a blood containing resection cavity within the gross tumour volume (GTV). 1H MRS is not an ideal method to study BPA concentration in GTV with blood in recent resection cavity. For an optimal identification of BPA signals in the in vivo 1H MR spectrum, both pre- and post-infusion 1H MRS should be performed. The post-infusion spectroscopy studies should be scheduled either prior to or, less optimally, immediately after the BNCT. The pre-BNCT MRS is necessary in order to utilise the MRS results in the actual dose planning.
PubMed ID
16233888 View in PubMed
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A 15-year analysis of early and late autologous hematopoietic stem cell transplant in relapsed, aggressive, transformed, and nontransformed follicular lymphoma.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature162371
Source
Biol Blood Marrow Transplant. 2007 Aug;13(8):956-64
Publication Type
Article
Date
Aug-2007
Author
Mitchell Sabloff
Harold L Atkins
Isabelle Bence-Bruckler
Christopher Bredeson
Dean Fergusson
Paul Genest
Harry Hopkins
Brian Hutton
Sheryl Mcdiarmid
Lothar B Huebsch
Author Affiliation
The Ottawa Hospital Blood and Marrow Transplant Program, University of Ottawa, Ottawa, Ontario, Canada. msabloff@ottawahospital.on.ca
Source
Biol Blood Marrow Transplant. 2007 Aug;13(8):956-64
Date
Aug-2007
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Aged
Antineoplastic Combined Chemotherapy Protocols - therapeutic use
Disease-Free Survival
Female
Hematopoietic Stem Cell Transplantation - adverse effects - methods
Humans
Longitudinal Studies
Lymphoma, Follicular - therapy
Male
Middle Aged
Neoplasm Recurrence, Local - therapy
Ontario
Retrospective Studies
Salvage Therapy - methods
Transplantation, Autologous - methods
Abstract
Autologous stem cell transplant (ASCT) has been shown to be an effective treatment for follicular lymphoma (FL). We explored our experience in ASCT for FL among all patients treated over a 15-year period from diagnosis through their entire treatment history including relapse post ASCT. All patients who underwent an unpurged ASCT for relapsed, advanced FL between June 1990 and December 2000 were analyzed. After salvage therapy they received melphalan/etoposide/total body irradiation, BCNU, etoposide, cytarabine, melphalan (BEAM), or cyclophosphamide BCNU etoposide (CBV) as conditioning for the ASCT. One hundred thirty-eight patients with a median age of 48 years and a median follow-up of 7.6 years were analyzed. The majority were of the subtype grade 1, nontransformed (FL-NT), having had 1 prior chemotherapy. The progression-free (PFS) and overall survival (OS) of the FL-NT at 10 years were 46% and 57%, respectively, and at 5 years for the transformed (FL-T) were 25% and 56%, respectively, of which only the PFS was significantly different (P=.007). The median OS from diagnosis was 16 years for the FL-NT. ASCT positively altered the trend of shorter remissions with subsequent chemotherapies, and there was no difference in OS between those who had 1, 2, or >2 chemotherapies prior to ASCT. Salvage therapy for relapse post ASCT was effective (OS>1 year) in a third of patients. Unpurged ASCT is an effective tool in the treatment of relapsed, aggressive FL-NT and FL-T, is superior to retreatment with standard chemotherapy, is effective at various stages of treatment, is likely to have a beneficial influence on the natural history of this disease, and the disease is amenable to salvage therapy post-ASCT relapse.
PubMed ID
17640600 View in PubMed
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18F-fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography-computed tomography for suspected recurrent papillary thyroid cancer: early experience at Sunnybrook Health Sciences Centre.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature153281
Source
J Otolaryngol Head Neck Surg. 2008 Oct;37(5):712-7
Publication Type
Article
Date
Oct-2008
Author
Max Dahele
Yee C Ung
Lisa Ehrlich
Jay Silverberg
Judith Balogh
C Shun Wong
Author Affiliation
Departmentof Radiation Oncology, University of Toronto, Edmond Odette Cancer Centre,Toronto, Ontario.
Source
J Otolaryngol Head Neck Surg. 2008 Oct;37(5):712-7
Date
Oct-2008
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Aged
Biological Markers - blood
Cancer Care Facilities
Carcinoma, Papillary - pathology - radionuclide imaging - surgery
Cohort Studies
Female
Fluorodeoxyglucose F18 - diagnostic use
Follow-Up Studies
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Neoplasm Recurrence, Local - pathology - radionuclide imaging - surgery
Neoplasm Staging
Ontario
Positron-Emission Tomography - methods
Reproducibility of Results
Retrospective Studies
Risk assessment
Sensitivity and specificity
Thyroglobulin - blood
Thyroid Neoplasms - pathology - radionuclide imaging - surgery
Thyroidectomy - methods
Time Factors
Treatment Outcome
Young Adult
Abstract
To report the initial experience with combined 18F-fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography (FDG PET)/computed tomography (CT) imaging for suspected recurrent papillary differentiated thyroid cancer (DTC) at Sunnybrook Health Sciences Centre (SHSC), Toronto.
Single institution retrospective study.
Consecutive patients from SHSC who underwent FDG PET/CT imaging for suspected recurrent DTC over a period of 2.5 years were identified and their charts reviewed.
Qualitative appraisal of FDG PET/CT imaging in suspected recurrent DTC.
Sixteen patients (14F, 2M) were identified accounting for 17 FDG PET/CT scans. Three scans (18%) in 3 different patients were reported as suspicious for recurrent disease in the neck (1-3 lesions) and were considered "positive". All were subsequently confirmed pathologically (4-13 positive lymph nodes post operatively). Prior conventional imaging was abnormal in two patients. Two patients had an elevated non-stimulated thyroglobulin (TG)
PubMed ID
19128681 View in PubMed
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25 years' experience with lymphangiomas in children.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature201178
Source
J Pediatr Surg. 1999 Jul;34(7):1164-8
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jul-1999
Author
A. Alqahtani
L T Nguyen
H. Flageole
K. Shaw
J M Laberge
Author Affiliation
The Montreal Children's Hospital, Department of Surgery, McGill University, Quebec, Canada.
Source
J Pediatr Surg. 1999 Jul;34(7):1164-8
Date
Jul-1999
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Abdominal Neoplasms - diagnosis - epidemiology - therapy
Adolescent
Age Distribution
Child
Child, Preschool
Evaluation Studies as Topic
Female
Head and Neck Neoplasms - diagnosis - epidemiology - therapy
Humans
Incidence
Infant, Newborn
Lymphangioma - diagnosis - epidemiology - therapy
Male
Mediastinal Neoplasms - diagnosis - epidemiology - therapy
Neoplasm Recurrence, Local - epidemiology - etiology
Pregnancy
Prognosis
Quebec - epidemiology
Retrospective Studies
Risk factors
Sex Distribution
Abstract
The management of lymphangioma in children is challenging because complete resection is difficult to achieve in some cases, and recurrences are common. The authors reviewed their experience to assess the risk factors for recurrence and the role of nonoperative treatment.
A retrospective study over a period of 25 years was carried out. One hundred eighty-six patients with 191 lesions (five patients with de novo lesions in different sites) were treated. There were 98 boys and 88 girls. The average age at diagnosis was 3.3 years (range, fetal life to 17 years) and the average size 8 cm in diameter. Histocytological confirmation was obtained in all patients. The involved sites were head and neck, 89 patients (48%); trunk and extremities, 78 patients (42%); internal or visceral locations (eg, abdominal and thorax), 19 patients (10%). The treatment consisted of macroscopically complete excision in 145 patients (150 lesions, of which five were recurrences in different sites), partial excision in 10 patients, aspiration in five patients, laser excision in 10 patients, biopsy only in four patients, drainage and biopsy in two patients, and injection of sclerosing agents in 10 patients.
There were 54 recurrences; 44 underwent excision (five of them more than once), and five regressed spontaneously on follow-up. Five other recurrences were stable and not progressing. Recurrences, (defined as clinically obvious disease), were found to be 100% after aspiration, 100% after injection, 40% after incomplete excision, 40% after laser excision, and 17% after macroscopically complete excision. The recurrence rate in the last group was the highest in the head (33%), the least in the internal locations (0%), and intermediate for the cervical location (13%). There were no significant differences, in terms of outcome, between those who had their surgery immediately at the time of diagnosis (n = 101) and those who had delayed surgery (n = 85).
There were fewer recurrences after macroscopically complete excision. Aspiration and injection had the highest recurrence rate. Risk factors for recurrence included location, size, and complexity of lesions. A period of observation may be useful for infants to facilitate complete excision. In the present series, spontaneous regression was infrequent and was seen more often with recurrent lesions.
PubMed ID
10442614 View in PubMed
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A 2011 updated systematic review and clinical practice guideline for the management of malignant extradural spinal cord compression.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature126132
Source
Int J Radiat Oncol Biol Phys. 2012 Oct 1;84(2):312-7
Publication Type
Article
Date
Oct-1-2012
Author
D Andrew Loblaw
Gunita Mitera
Michael Ford
Normand J Laperriere
Author Affiliation
Department of Radiation Oncology, Sunnybrook Health Science Centre, University of Toronto, Toronto, Canada. andrew.loblaw@sunnybrook.ca
Source
Int J Radiat Oncol Biol Phys. 2012 Oct 1;84(2):312-7
Date
Oct-1-2012
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Decompression, Surgical - methods
Dose Fractionation
Humans
Meta-Analysis as Topic
Multicenter Studies as Topic
Neoplasm Recurrence, Local - radiotherapy
Ontario
Randomized Controlled Trials as Topic
Retrospective Studies
Spinal Cord Compression - diagnosis - therapy
Spinal Cord Neoplasms - secondary - therapy
Steroids - therapeutic use
Walking
Abstract
To update the 2005 Cancer Care Ontario practice guidelines for the diagnosis and treatment of adult patients with a suspected or confirmed diagnosis of extradural malignant spinal cord compression (MESCC).
A review and analysis of data published from January 2004 to May 2011. The systematic literature review included published randomized control trials (RCTs), systematic reviews, meta-analyses, and prospective/retrospective studies.
An RCT of radiation therapy (RT) with or without decompressive surgery showed improvements in pain, ambulatory ability, urinary continence, duration of continence, functional status, and overall survival. Two RCTs of RT (30 Gy in eight fractions vs. 16 Gy in two fractions; 16 Gy in two fractions vs. 8 Gy in one fraction) in patients with a poor prognosis showed no difference in ambulation, duration of ambulation, bladder function, pain response, in-field failure, and overall survival. Retrospective multicenter studies reported that protracted RT schedules in nonsurgical patients with a good prognosis improved local control but had no effect on functional or survival outcomes.
If not medically contraindicated, steroids are recommended for any patient with neurologic deficits suspected or confirmed to have MESCC. Surgery should be considered for patients with a good prognosis who are medically and surgically operable. RT should be given to nonsurgical patients. For those with a poor prognosis, a single fraction of 8 Gy should be given; for those with a good prognosis, 30 Gy in 10 fractions could be considered. Patients should be followed up clinically and/or radiographically to determine whether a local relapse develops. Salvage therapies should be introduced before significant neurologic deficits occur.
PubMed ID
22420969 View in PubMed
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Abdominoperineal extralevator resection.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature120975
Source
Dan Med J. 2012 Sep;59(9):A4366
Publication Type
Article
Date
Sep-2012
Author
Mattias Prytz
Eva Angenete
Eva Haglind
Author Affiliation
Department of surgery, NU-hospital group, S-461 85, Trollhättan, Sweden. mattias.prytz@vgregion.se
Source
Dan Med J. 2012 Sep;59(9):A4366
Date
Sep-2012
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Abdomen - surgery
Clinical Trials as Topic
Humans
Neoplasm Recurrence, Local - etiology
Perineum - surgery
Postoperative Complications - etiology
Quality of Life
Rectal Neoplasms - surgery
Registries
Research Design
Self Report
Sweden
Time Factors
Abstract
Abdominoperineal resection for distal rectal cancer is associated with a higher recurrence rate and a poorer overall prognosis than anterior resection. In order to improve the outcome, a more extensive procedure - extralevator abdominoperineal resection - has been introduced. There are, however, currently no prospective or registry-based studies on the effect of this new procedure on local recurrence rates.
Abdominoperineal extralevator resection (APER) is a registry-based Swedish study investigating local recurrence rate three years postoperatively in the entire population of Swedish patients who underwent abdominoperineal resection or extralevator abdominoperineal resection in the 2007-2009-period. In addition to local recurrence rates, the study also investigates the functional and quality-of-life-related outcome 3-4 years postoperatively in the entire study population.
Distal rectal cancer is a surgical and oncological challenge. The APER study will be able to compare the two operative techniques (standard abdominoperineal resection or extralevator abdominoperineal resection) in terms of oncological and functional outcome.
not relevant.
The trial is registered at ClinicalTrials.gov, identifier NCT01296984.
PubMed ID
22951192 View in PubMed
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Absolute risk reductions for local recurrence after postoperative radiotherapy after sector resection for ductal carcinoma in situ of the breast.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature87239
Source
J Clin Oncol. 2008 Mar 10;26(8):1247-52
Publication Type
Article
Date
Mar-10-2008
Author
Holmberg Lars
Garmo Hans
Granstrand Bengt
Ringberg Anita
Arnesson Lars-Gunnar
Sandelin Kerstin
Karlsson Per
Anderson Harald
Emdin Stefan
Author Affiliation
Division of Cancer Studies, Thomas Guy House, 3rd Floor, King's College London, Guy's Campus, London SE1 9RT, United Kingdom. lars.holmberg@kcl.ac.uk
Source
J Clin Oncol. 2008 Mar 10;26(8):1247-52
Date
Mar-10-2008
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aged
Breast Neoplasms - radiotherapy - surgery
Carcinoma, Ductal, Breast - radiotherapy - surgery
Carcinoma, Intraductal, Noninfiltrating - radiotherapy - surgery
Female
Humans
Middle Aged
Neoplasm Recurrence, Local - etiology - prevention & control
Postoperative Period
Risk Reduction Behavior
Survival Rate
Sweden
Treatment Outcome
Abstract
PURPOSE: Evaluate the effects of radiotherapy after sector resection for ductal carcinoma in situ of the breast (DCIS) in patient groups as defined by age, size of the lesion, focality, completeness of excision and mode of detection. PATIENTS AND METHODS: A total of 1,067 women in Sweden were randomly assigned to either postoperative radiotherapy (RT) or control from 1987 to 1999, and 1,046 were followed for a mean of 8 years. The main outcome was new ipsilateral breast cancer events and distant metastasis-free survival analyzed according to intention to treat. RESULTS: There were 64 ipsilateral events in the RT arm and 141 in the control group corresponding to a risk reduction of 16.0 percentage points at 10 years (95% CI, 10.3% to 21.6%) and a relative risk of 0.40 (95% CI, 0.30 to 0.54). There was no statistically significant difference in distant metastasis-free survival. There was an effect modification by age, yielding a low effect of RT in women younger than 50, but substantial protection in women older than 60 years. The age effect was not confounded by focality, lesion size, completeness of excision, or detection mode. There was no group as defined by our stratification variables that had a low risk without radiotherapy. CONCLUSION: Our results indicate that younger women have a low protective effect of conventional RT after sector resection. Older women benefit substantially. We caution that the age effect was seen in a subgroup analysis. Further search with conventional clinical variables for a low risk group that does not need RT does not seem fruitful.
PubMed ID
18250350 View in PubMed
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Access to neuropsychologic services after pediatric brain tumor.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature106864
Source
Pediatr Neurol. 2013 Dec;49(6):420-3
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-2013
Author
Ingrid Tonning Olsson
Sean Perrin
Johan Lundgren
Lars Hjorth
Aki Johanson
Author Affiliation
Department of Psychology, Lund University, Lund, Sweden; Department of Pediatrics, Skåne University Hospital, Lund, Sweden. Electronic address: ingrid.tonning-olsson@skane.se.
Source
Pediatr Neurol. 2013 Dec;49(6):420-3
Date
Dec-2013
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Brain Neoplasms - complications - psychology
Child
Child, Preschool
Cognition Disorders - etiology - rehabilitation
Female
Humans
Infant
Infant, Newborn
Male
Neoplasm Recurrence, Local - complications - psychology
Neuropsychological Tests
Pediatrics
Retrospective Studies
Risk factors
Sweden
Abstract
Increasing survival rates for children with brain tumors creates a greater need for neuropsychologic follow-up and intervention. The aim of this study was to evaluate rates of referral by medical doctors to neuropsychologic services and patient and treatment factors that differentiated referred and nonreferred patients.
Data were retrieved from medical records of all pediatric brain tumor patients in southern Sweden diagnosed between 1993 and 2004 who survived more than 1 year (n = 132). Characteristics of the patients, the cancer, and treatment received were then compared for patients who were and were not referred for neuropsychologic examination during that period.
Sixty-four (48%) of the pediatric brain tumor patients were referred for neuropsychologic evaluation. These patients had significantly larger tumors, more recurrences of cancer, and increased intracranial pressure at diagnosis when compared with the nonreferred group (n = 68). However, most of the patients in the nonreferred group either had significant risk factors for cognitive impairment or were reporting impairments that would suggest a referral was warranted.
Given the high rates of cognitive impairment in children with brain tumors, referral to neuropsychologic services should be considered in all survivors. In addition to improving long-term adjustment, systematic referral can provide data on cognitive impairments, making it possible to evaluate different cancer treatment protocols not only in terms of survival but also in terms of quality of survival. Greater efforts are needed to disseminate and raise awareness about published guidelines on the long-term care of pediatric brain tumor patients.
PubMed ID
24095573 View in PubMed
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987 records – page 1 of 99.