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5-Aminolevulinic acid in intraoperative photodynamic therapy of bladder cancer (results of multicenter trial).

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature281149
Source
Photodiagnosis Photodyn Ther. 2016 Dec;16:106-109
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-2016
Author
E V Filonenko
A D Kaprin
B Y A Alekseev
O I Apolikhin
E K Slovokhodov
V I Ivanova-Radkevich
A N Urlova
Source
Photodiagnosis Photodyn Ther. 2016 Dec;16:106-109
Date
Dec-2016
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Aged
Aminolevulinic Acid - administration & dosage
Combined Modality Therapy - methods
Cystectomy - methods
Female
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Neoplasm Invasiveness
Photochemotherapy - methods
Photosensitizing Agents - administration & dosage
Russia
Treatment Outcome
Urinary Bladder Neoplasms - diagnosis - pathology - therapy
Abstract
The results of multicenter prospective trial for efficacy of combined modality treatment: transurethral resection (TUR)+photodynamic therapy (PDT) with alasens for bladder cancer are represented in the article. Trials were organized by Research Institute of Organic Intermediates and Dyes and conducted according to clinical protocol approved by Ministry of Health of Russia, at the sites of leading Russian cancer clinical centers. The trial included 45 subjects with verified diagnosis of non-muscle-invasive bladder cancer. Patients underwent TUR of bladder with simultaneous PDT as anti-relapse treatment. Alasens was administered to patients as intravesicular instillation of 3% solution in volume of 50ml with 1.5-2h exposure (prior to TUR). TUR was performed after instillation. PDT session was conducted immediately after the completion of TUR on a single occasion by means of combined local irradiation on tumor bed with diffuse irradiation on whole urinary bladder mucosa (light dose of local irradiation - 100J/cm2, diffuse irradiation - 20J/cm2). Good tolerance of the treatment was noticed, there were no complications. Among 45 patients included in the trial, 35 (78%) completed 12 month protocol follow-up without relapse. In our study PDT with alasens after TUR reported a recurrence rate of non-muscle-invasive bladder cancer for 1st year after treatment of 22%. TUR with intraoperative PDT with 5-aminolevulinic acid may offer an alternative in the treatment of non-muscle-invasive intermediate and high-risk bladder cancer.
PubMed ID
27671517 View in PubMed
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70 K type IV collagenase (gelatinase).

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature24598
Source
Matrix Suppl. 1992;1:45-50
Publication Type
Article
Date
1992
Author
K. Tryggvason
P. Huhtala
M. Höyhtya
E. Hujanen
T. Hurskainen
Author Affiliation
Biocenter, University of Oulu, Finland.
Source
Matrix Suppl. 1992;1:45-50
Date
1992
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Amino Acid Sequence
Animals
Base Sequence
Basement Membrane - metabolism
Collagenases - chemistry - genetics - immunology - physiology
Gelatinase B
Genes
Humans
Molecular Sequence Data
Molecular Weight
Neoplasm Invasiveness
Neoplasm Proteins - physiology
Rabbits
Rats
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Sequence Alignment
Substrate Specificity
Abstract
Type IV collagenase (gelatinase) is a 70,000 dalton neutral metalloproteinase that specifically cleaves type IV collagen in addition to degrading denatured collagen (gelatin). It is secreted in a latent proenzyme form that is converted proteolytically in the extracellular space to a 62,000 dalton active enzyme. The primary structure, enzymatic properties as well as gene structure, demonstrate that type IV collagenase is closely related with the other well characterized metalloproteinases, interstitial collagenase and stromelysin. However, the structure of type IV collagenase differs from the others in that it is larger and contains three internal repeats that resemble the type II domains of fibronectin. Also, initial characterization of the promoter region of the gene indicates that its regulation differs from the other proteinase genes. Type IV collagenase is presumably required for the normal turnover of basement membranes. Augmented activity is linked with the invasive potential of tumor cells and the enzyme is believed to play a major role in the penetration of basement membranes by metastatic cells. Measurements of enzyme activity and mRNA levels as well as immunostaining of a variety of tumor cells and tissues suggest that assays for the enzyme may have value in the follow-up of malignant growth.
PubMed ID
1480085 View in PubMed
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Adenocarcinoma of the esophagus and/or gastric cardia.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature234796
Source
Cancer. 1987 Sep 1;60(5):1094-8
Publication Type
Article
Date
Sep-1-1987
Author
W C MacDonald
J B MacDonald
Source
Cancer. 1987 Sep 1;60(5):1094-8
Date
Sep-1-1987
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adenocarcinoma - epidemiology - pathology
Alcohol Drinking
Barrett Esophagus - pathology
Canada - ethnology
Cardia - pathology
Esophageal Neoplasms - epidemiology - pathology
Female
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Neoplasm Invasiveness
Smoking
Stomach Neoplasms - epidemiology - pathology
United States - ethnology
Abstract
One hundred twenty-nine adenocarcinomas involving the esophagus and/or gastric cardia differed significantly from 212 cancers of the rest of the stomach as follows: male-female ratio, 6:1 versus 2:1, birth outside Canada, US or UK, 12% versus 34%; parent or sibling with gastric cancer, 5% versus 13%; previous duodenal ulcer, 23% versus 9%; chronic reflux symptoms, 25% versus 3%; hiatal hernia, 51% versus 11%. Of the 129 esophagocardia cancers, 24 involved the esophagus alone, 48 the cardia and esophagus, 33 the cardia alone or cardia and fundus, and 24 the upper stomach and lower esophagus extensively. Thirty-four were associated with Barrett's esophagus. The 72 patients with involvement of both the upper stomach and lower esophagus (48 cardia and esophagus, 24 extensive) were identical with the esophagocardia group as a whole. The 24 patients with esophageal cancer and the 34 with Barrett's epithelium were the same clinically as the whole esophagocardia group except more had chronic reflux and hiatal hernia. The 33 patients with cancer confined to the cardia or cardia and fundus resembled the whole esophagocardia group but did not have Barrett's esophagus. Adenocarcinoma of the esophagocardia region is probably a different disease from cancer of the rest of the stomach.
PubMed ID
3607726 View in PubMed
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Adenoma and tiny carcinoma in adenoma of the papilla of Vater--p53 and PCNA.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature20910
Source
Hepatogastroenterology. 1999 May-Jun;46(27):1959-62
Publication Type
Article
Author
T. Sato
K. Konishi
H. Kimura
K. Maeda
K. Yabushita
M. Tsuji
A. Miwa
Author Affiliation
Department of Surgery, Toyama Prefectural Central Hospital, Japan. YIB03163@niftyserve.or.jp
Source
Hepatogastroenterology. 1999 May-Jun;46(27):1959-62
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adenocarcinoma - pathology - surgery
Adenoma - pathology - surgery
Adult
Aged
Ampulla of Vater - pathology - surgery
Cell Division - physiology
Cell Transformation, Neoplastic - pathology
Common Bile Duct Neoplasms - pathology - surgery
Humans
Male
Neoplasm Invasiveness
Neoplasms, Multiple Primary - pathology - surgery
Proliferating Cell Nuclear Antigen - analysis
Tumor Markers, Biological - analysis
Tumor Suppressor Protein p53 - analysis
Abstract
BACKGROUND/AIMS: Adenomas develop only rarely in the small bowel mucosa. We particularly tried to clarify the histologic change in atypia of ampullary adenomas which are not familial polyposis. METHODOLOGY: Four adenomas, 4 adenocarcinomas, and 4 normal mucosal regions of the ampulla of Vater were investigated in this study. All cases were characterized in paraffin sections for the presence of p53 protein using the anti-p53 monoclonal antibody (DO7, Dako Corp., Glostrup, Denmark) and proliferating cell nuclear antigen using the anti-PCNA antibody (PC 10, Dako A/S, Copenhagen, Denmark). To obtain the percentages (labeling index) of PCNA, a dual wavelength imaging microdensitometer (CAS 200, Elmhurst, IL) was used. RESULTS: Transition of adenoma into adenocarcinoma was recognized in 2 of 4 cases. Labeling index of PCNA was 12.2% in normal mucosa, 41.3% in adenomas, and 66.0% in adenocarcinoma, respectively. In 2 cases with carcinoma in adenoma, labeling index was higher in carcinomatous lesion than in adenomatous lesion. p53 Protein was positive in all cases of adenocarcinoma of the ampulla of Vater, and not in any case of normal mucosa or adenoma. CONCLUSIONS: The adenoma-carcinoma sequence was morphologically recognized especially in tiny carcinoma in adenoma of the papilla of Vater. Both p53 mutation and high proliferative activity play important roles for the histogenesis of invasive adenocarcinoma.
PubMed ID
10430377 View in PubMed
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Advanced craniofacial juvenile nasopharyngeal angiofibroma. Description of surgical series, case report, and review of literature.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature137527
Source
Acta Neurochir (Wien). 2011 Mar;153(3):499-508
Publication Type
Article
Date
Mar-2011
Author
Vasily A Cherekaev
Denis A Golbin
Dmitry N Kapitanov
Vitaly V Roginsky
Sergey B Yakovlev
Sergey R Arustamian
Author Affiliation
Department of Skull Base and Craniofacial Surgery, N.N. Burdenko Neurosurgical Institute, 4th Tverskaya-Yamskaya str., 16, 125047, Moscow, Russia. tch@nsi.ru
Source
Acta Neurochir (Wien). 2011 Mar;153(3):499-508
Date
Mar-2011
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Angiofibroma - blood supply - diagnosis - pathology - surgery
Angiography
Cerebrospinal Fluid Rhinorrhea - etiology - surgery
Child
Embolization, Therapeutic
Humans
Male
Moscow
Nasopharyngeal Neoplasms - blood supply - diagnosis - pathology - surgery
Neoplasm Invasiveness
Postoperative Complications - etiology - surgery
Preoperative Care
Reoperation
Retrospective Studies
Tomography, X-Ray Computed
Young Adult
Abstract
Juvenile nasopharyngeal angiofibroma (JNA) is a rare benign tumor occurring almost exclusively in adolescent and young adult males. The tumor is characterized by slow progression, aggressive growth, high vascularization, and increased rate of persistence and recurrence. The aim of this study was to describe a case of giant JNA from our practice and discuss the controversies of surgical treatment of advanced JNA.
A series of 29 consecutive male patients with JNA Fisch grade III and IV was surgically treated in Burdenko Neurosurgical Institute from 2000 until 2008. In the vast majority of cases, endovascular embolization and surgical removal via orbitozygomatic approach were applied.
Gross total resection was achieved in 24 cases (83%). Complications were encountered in eight cases. No mortality was observed. In three patients, the diseases recurred. An illustrative case is described.
Surgical treatment is the basic tactics in management of extensive JNA including endovascular embolization and resection of the tumor. We recommend using orbitozygomatic approach or its modifications in JNA. Radiation therapy may be recommended for patients with small residual tumor.
Notes
Comment In: Acta Neurochir (Wien). 2011 Oct;153(10):1997-821805285
PubMed ID
21274578 View in PubMed
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Age is prognostic variable in cervical squamous cell carcinoma.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature222168
Source
Eur J Gynaecol Oncol. 1993;14(4):283-91
Publication Type
Article
Date
1993
Author
D. Robertson
D M Fedorkow
G C Stuart
S E McGregor
M A Duggan
G. Nation
Author Affiliation
Department of Pathology, Tom Baker Cancer Centre, and University of Calgary, Canada.
Source
Eur J Gynaecol Oncol. 1993;14(4):283-91
Date
1993
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Age Factors
Canada - epidemiology
Carcinoma, Squamous Cell - diagnosis - mortality
Female
Humans
Middle Aged
Neoplasm Invasiveness
Neoplasm Staging
Prognosis
Recurrence
Retrospective Studies
Uterine Cervical Neoplasms - diagnosis - mortality
Abstract
A clinico-pathologic review was performed on all younger (under 35 years) and older (55 years or over) women with a diagnosis of cervical squamous cell carcinoma assessed at the Tom Baker Cancer Centre from 1980 to 1985 to determine the effect of age at diagnosis on survival. 45 younger women were identified: 32 were Stage IB; 10, Stage II; and 3, Stage III. 64 older women were identified: 16 were Stage IB; 30, Stage II; 14, Stage III; and 4, Stage IV. For Stage IB women, 40.6% of younger patients developed persistent or recurrent disease and all except one are dead; only one (6.2%) older woman's tumour recurred and she is alive with disease. Younger women had a poorer disease-free survival not only for Stage IB disease (p = 0.014) but also in Stages II and III (p = 0.020). In this study age at diagnosis was an independent prognostic variable with younger women having a poorer disease-free and overall survival.
PubMed ID
8344321 View in PubMed
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Alcohol intake and mortality among women with invasive breast cancer.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature128247
Source
Br J Cancer. 2012 Jan 31;106(3):592-5
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jan-31-2012
Author
H R Harris
L. Bergkvist
A. Wolk
Author Affiliation
Division of Nutritional Epidemiology, Institute for Environmental Medicine, Karolinska Institutet, Box 210, 171 77, Stockholm, Sweden. holly.harris@ki.se
Source
Br J Cancer. 2012 Jan 31;106(3):592-5
Date
Jan-31-2012
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aged
Alcohol Drinking
Breast Neoplasms - etiology - mortality - pathology
Cohort Studies
Diet Surveys
Female
Humans
Mammography
Middle Aged
Neoplasm Invasiveness
Proportional Hazards Models
Prospective Studies
Questionnaires
Survival Analysis
Sweden - epidemiology
Abstract
Alcohol intake has consistently been associated with increased breast cancer incidence in epidemiological studies. However, the relation between alcohol and survival after breast cancer diagnosis is less clear.
We investigated whether alcohol intake was associated with survival among 3146 women diagnosed with invasive breast cancer in the Swedish Mammography Cohort. Alcohol consumption was estimated using a food frequency questionnaire. Cox proportional hazard models were used to calculate hazard ratios (HRs) and 95% confidence intervals (95% CIs).
From 1987 to 2008 there were 385 breast cancer-specific deaths and 860 total deaths. No significant association was observed between alcohol intake and breast cancer-specific survival. Women who consumed 10 g per day (corresponding to approximately 0.75 to 1 drinks) or more of alcohol had an adjusted HR (95% CI) of breast cancer-specific death of 1.36 (0.82-2.26;p(trend)=0.47) compared with non-drinkers. A significant inverse association was observed between alcohol and non-breast cancer deaths. Those who consumed 3.4-9.9 g per day of alcohol had a 33% lower risk of death compared with non-drinkers (95% CI 0.50-0.90;p(trend)=0.04).
Our findings suggest that alcohol intake up to approximately one small drink per day does not negatively impact breast cancer-specific survival and a half drink per day is associated with a decreased risk of mortality from other causes.
Notes
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PubMed ID
22215064 View in PubMed
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Alcoholism and risk for cancer of the cervix uteri, vagina, and vulva.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature19635
Source
Cancer Epidemiol Biomarkers Prev. 2001 Aug;10(8):899-901
Publication Type
Article
Date
Aug-2001
Author
E. Weiderpass
W. Ye
R. Tamimi
D. Trichopolous
O. Nyren
H. Vainio
H O Adami
Author Affiliation
International Agency for Research on Cancer, Lyon, France. Weiderpass@iarc.fr
Source
Cancer Epidemiol Biomarkers Prev. 2001 Aug;10(8):899-901
Date
Aug-2001
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Alcoholism - complications
Carcinoma in Situ - complications - etiology
Cohort Studies
Female
Humans
Mass Screening
Middle Aged
Neoplasm Invasiveness
Odds Ratio
Papillomavirus, Human - pathogenicity
Papovaviridae Infections - complications
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Risk factors
Tumor Virus Infections - complications
Uterine Cervical Neoplasms - epidemiology - etiology
Vaginal Neoplasms - epidemiology - etiology
Vaginal Smears
Vulvar Neoplasms - epidemiology - etiology
Abstract
We conducted a population-based cohort study to analyze the risk of developing cancers of the female genitals among 36,856 patients with a hospital discharge diagnosis of alcoholism (ICD-7: 307, 322; ICD-8: 291, 303; ICD-9: 291, 303, 305A) in Sweden between 1965 and 1995. The follow-up was done by linkages of national registries. Standardized incidence ratios (SIRs) and 95% confidence intervals (CIs) were computed based on nationwide specific cancer rates. The first year of follow-up was excluded from all analyses to minimize the impact of selection bias. We found that alcoholic women had excess risks for in situ cervical cancer (SIR, 1.7; 95% CI, 1.6-1.9), for invasive cervical cancer (SIR, 2.9; 95% CI, 2.4-3.5), and for cancer of the vagina (SIR, 4.6; 95% CI, 2.2-8.5) but not for cancer of the vulva (SIR, 1.0; 95% CI, 0.4-2.0). The fact that alcoholics had an excess risk also for the in situ cancer suggests that the observed excess in invasive cervical cancer may not only be attributable to less use of Pap smear screening among them. The alcoholic women may be at higher risk for the progression from human papillomavirus infection to a malignant lesion for lifestyle-related reasons (promiscuity, smoking, use of contraceptive hormones, and dietary deficiencies). We conclude that alcoholic women are at high risk for in situ and invasive cervical cancer and for cancer of the vagina.
PubMed ID
11489758 View in PubMed
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Alpha CTX as a biomarker of skeletal invasion of breast cancer: immunolocalization and the load dependency of urinary excretion.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature81477
Source
Cancer Epidemiol Biomarkers Prev. 2006 Jul;15(7):1392-5
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jul-2006
Author
Leeming Diana J
Delling Günter
Koizumi Mitsuru
Henriksen Kim
Karsdal Morten A
Li Bo
Qvist Per
Tankó László B
Byrjalsen Inger
Author Affiliation
Nordic Bioscience A/S, Herlev, Denmark. djl@nordicbioscience.com
Source
Cancer Epidemiol Biomarkers Prev. 2006 Jul;15(7):1392-5
Date
Jul-2006
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Bone Neoplasms - diagnosis - secondary - urine
Breast Neoplasms - pathology - urine
Collagen Type I - urine
Female
Humans
Immunoenzyme Techniques
Neoplasm Invasiveness - diagnosis
Osteoclasts - metabolism
Peptides - urine
Tumor Markers, Biological - urine
Abstract
We recently showed that increased urinary excretion of the cross-linked, nonisomerized form of the C-telopeptide of collagen type I (alphaalphaCTX) could be a sensitive indicator of the presence of bone metastases in breast cancer patients. The present study was sought to investigate (a) the localization of alphaCTX epitopes in the proximity of a bone metastasis and (b) the relationship between number of metastases and the urinary excretion of alphaalphaCTX. Adjacent bone sections from breast cancer patients were stained for the presence of tumor cells (anti-cytokeratin antibody), osteoclasts (TRAcP activity), and alphaCTX (anti-alphaCTX antibody). The association between the extent of metastatic bone disease and urinary excretion of alphaalphaCTX measured with ELISA was assessed in 90 breast cancer patients (45 with bone metastasis and 45 without bone metastasis). Immunohistochemistry revealed accumulation of TRAcP-positive osteoclasts and intense staining for alphaCTX epitopes in the proximity of cytokeratin-positive bone metastasis. Areas of alphaCTX staining showed unstructured bone tissue under polarized light. In addition, there was a significant linear association between the number of bone metastases and the urinary levels of alphaalphaCTX in breast cancer patients with metastatic bone disease, independent of age and body mass index (r = 0.56, P
PubMed ID
16835341 View in PubMed
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American Society of Clinical Oncology endorsement of the cancer care Ontario practice guideline on adjuvant ovarian ablation in the treatment of premenopausal women with early-stage invasive breast cancer.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature131493
Source
J Clin Oncol. 2011 Oct 10;29(29):3939-42
Publication Type
Article
Date
Oct-10-2011
Author
Jennifer J Griggs
Mark R Somerfield
Holly Anderson
N Lynn Henry
Clifford A Hudis
James L Khatcheressian
Ann H Partridge
Ann Alexis Prestrud
Nancy E Davidson
Author Affiliation
University of Michigan Health System, Ann Arbor, MI, USA. guidelines@asco.org
Source
J Clin Oncol. 2011 Oct 10;29(29):3939-42
Date
Oct-10-2011
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Ablation Techniques
Antineoplastic Combined Chemotherapy Protocols - therapeutic use
Breast Neoplasms - drug therapy - pathology - surgery
Female
Humans
Neoplasm Invasiveness
Neoplasm Metastasis
Ontario
Ovary - pathology
Practice Guidelines as Topic
Premenopause
Abstract
The American Society of Clinical Oncology (ASCO) has policies and procedures for endorsing practice guidelines that have been developed by other professional organizations.
The Cancer Care Ontario (CCO) Guideline on Adjuvant Ovarian Ablation (OA) in the Treatment of Premenopausal Women With Early-Stage Invasive Breast Cancer was reviewed for developmental rigor by methodologists. An ad hoc review panel of experts reviewed the content.
The ASCO ad hoc OA guideline review panel concurred that the recommendations are clear, thorough, based on the most relevant scientific evidence in this content area, and present options that will be acceptable to patients. According to the CCO guideline: one, OA should not be routinely added to systemic therapy with chemotherapy, tamoxifen, or the combination of tamoxifen and chemotherapy; two, OA alone is not recommended as an alternative to any other form of systemic therapy, except in the specific case of patients who are candidates for other forms of systemic therapy but who, for some reason, will not receive any other systemic therapy (eg, patients who cannot tolerate other forms of systemic therapy or patients who choose no other form of systemic therapy); and three, when chemical suppression using luteinizing hormone-releasing hormone agonists is the chosen method of OA, in the opinion of the Breast Cancer Disease Site Group, monthly injection is the recommended mode of administration. The mode of administration in nearly all of the available trials has been monthly administration.
The ASCO review panel agrees with the recommendations as stated in the CCO guideline, with the qualification that ongoing research studies may alter the recommendations of the panel.
Notes
Erratum In: J Clin Oncol. 2012 Apr 20;30(12):1398
PubMed ID
21900112 View in PubMed
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442 records – page 1 of 45.