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Age-related immunogenicity of meningococcal polysaccharide vaccine in aboriginal children and adolescents living in a Northern Manitoba reserve community.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature33624
Source
Pediatr Infect Dis J. 1998 Oct;17(10):860-4
Publication Type
Article
Date
Oct-1998
Author
B J Law
T. Rosenberg
N E MacDonald
F E Ashton
J C Huang
W J King
W J Ferris
G J Gray
Author Affiliation
Department of Medical Microbiology, University of Manitoba, Canada. blaw@ms.umanitoba.ca
Source
Pediatr Infect Dis J. 1998 Oct;17(10):860-4
Date
Oct-1998
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
American Native Continental Ancestry Group
Antibodies, Bacterial - biosynthesis
Bacterial Vaccines - immunology
Carrier State - epidemiology
Child
Child, Preschool
Humans
Infant
Manitoba - epidemiology
Meningococcal Infections - epidemiology - prevention & control
Meningococcal Vaccines
Neisseria meningitidis - classification - immunology - isolation & purification
Prospective Studies
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Serotyping
Abstract
OBJECTIVE: To determine the total and functional serogroup C antibody response to a quadrivalent meningococcal polysaccharide vaccine in a group of aboriginal infants, children and adolescents. A secondary objective was to determine their prevalence of meningococcal carriage. DESIGN: Open prospective, before and after intervention study. SUBJECTS: Aboriginal children ages 0.5 to 19.9 years, living in a single Northern community and eligible for a public health immunization campaign conducted in all Manitoba native reserve communities to control a meningococcal serogroup C, electrophoretic type (ET) 15 outbreak. No outbreak cases had occurred in the community at the time of the study. METHODS: Total serogroup C capsular polysaccharide antibody (CPA) and functional bactericidal antibody (BA) responses were measured by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay and bactericidal assay, respectively. RESULTS: Neisseria meningitidis was recovered from the oropharynx of 13 (5.2%) of 249 aboriginal children including 4 (1.6%) serogroup C isolates, all with the designation C:2a:P1.2,5 ET15. Paired sera from 152 children were available for assay. For CPA the geometric mean concentrations and proportions with > or =2 microg/ml before and after immunization were 0.69, 18% and 12.3, 96%, respectively. A significant increase in serum CPA was achieved by children of all ages, with the greatest response occurring after age 11 years. Among infants or =2 microg/ml. For BA the pre- and post-vaccine geometric mean titers were 1.02 and 45.9. The response was significantly associated with age. BA titers > or =1:8 were present, before and after immunization, respectively, in 0 and 0% of infants or =2-year-olds. CONCLUSION: The age-related total and functional group C meningococcal antibody response after quadrivalent polysaccharide vaccine among aboriginals is similar to that reported for Caucasian children. After age 2 all children made excellent CPA and BA responses. In the younger age groups the BA response was blunted but 82 to 95% achieved CPA titers of > or =2 microg/ml.
PubMed ID
9802625 View in PubMed
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Effectiveness of a mass immunization campaign against serogroup C meningococcal disease in Quebec.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature195996
Source
JAMA. 2001 Jan 10;285(2):177-81
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jan-10-2001
Author
P. De Wals
G. De Serres
T. Niyonsenga
Author Affiliation
Département des sciences de la santé communautaire, Université de Sherbrooke, 3001 12th Ave N, Sherbrooke, Quebec, Canada J1H 5N4. pdewals@courrier.usherb.ca
Source
JAMA. 2001 Jan 10;285(2):177-81
Date
Jan-10-2001
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Antigens, Bacterial
Child
Child, Preschool
Humans
Immunization Programs
Incidence
Infant
Logistic Models
Meningococcal Infections - epidemiology - prevention & control
Meningococcal Vaccines - administration & dosage
Neisseria meningitidis - classification - immunology
Polysaccharides, Bacterial
Quebec - epidemiology
Serotyping
Abstract
An outbreak of meningococcal disease in Quebec province prompted a mass immunization program. The impact of this campaign on the epidemiology of meningococcal disease has not been studied.
To study the impact of a mass immunization campaign using polysaccharide vaccine on the epidemiology of meningococcal disease (MCD) and to assess serogroup C vaccine effectiveness (VE).
Analysis of MCD cases reported in Quebec from 1990 to 1998, before and after the mass immunization campaign was conducted during the winter of 1992-1993, when 84% of residents aged 6 months to 20 years (the target population, approximately 1.9 million individuals) were vaccinated.
Incidence of MCD in 1990-1998; incidence of culture-proven serogroup C MCD between April 1, 1993, and March 31, 1998, compared among vaccinated and unvaccinated persons in the target population.
The incidence of serogroup C disease decreased after the mass immunization campaign, from 1.4 per 100 000 in 1990-1992 to 0.3 per 100 000 in 1993-1998, and the overall incidence of other serogroups remained stable at 0.7 per 100 000, with a small increase in the proportion of cases caused by serogroup Y (P =.009). Protection from serogroup C MCD was indicated in the first 2 years after vaccine administration (VE, 65%; 95% confidence interval [CI], 20%-84%), but not in the next 3 years (VE, 0%; 95% CI, -5% to 65%). Vaccine effectiveness was strongly related to age at vaccination: 83% (95% CI, 39%-96%) for ages 15 through 20 years, 75% (95% CI, - 17% to 93%) for ages 10 through 14 years, and 41% (95% CI, -106% to 79%) for ages 2 through 9 years. There was no evidence of protection in children younger than 2 years; all 8 MCD cases in this age group occurred in vaccinees.
Serogroup C polysaccharide vaccine is effective for controlling outbreaks in teenaged individuals but should not be used in children younger than 2 years. The mass campaign did not induce significant serogroup switching.
Notes
Comment In: JAMA. 2001 Mar 28;285(12):1578-911268264
PubMed ID
11176810 View in PubMed
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Emergence of a new virulent clone within the electrophoretic type 5 complex of serogroup B meningococci in Norway.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature215240
Source
Clin Diagn Lab Immunol. 1995 May;2(3):314-21
Publication Type
Article
Date
May-1995
Author
E. Wedege
J. Kolberg
A. Delvig
E A Høiby
E. Holten
E. Rosenqvist
D A Caugant
Author Affiliation
Department of Vaccine, National Institute of Public Health, Oslo, Norway.
Source
Clin Diagn Lab Immunol. 1995 May;2(3):314-21
Date
May-1995
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Amino Acid Sequence
Antibodies, Monoclonal - immunology
Bacterial Proteins - immunology
Blood Bactericidal Activity
Clone Cells
Electrophoresis
Epitope Mapping
Humans
Immunoglobulin G - immunology
Molecular Sequence Data
Neisseria meningitidis - classification - immunology - pathogenicity
Neisseriaceae Infections - epidemiology - immunology
Norway - epidemiology
Seroepidemiologic Studies
Serotyping
Virulence
Abstract
An increase in B:15:P1.12 meningococci among isolates from patients with Neisseria meningitidis infection in Norway in recent years led to further characterization of such strains. Between 1987 and 1992, B:15:P1.12 strains constituted 9.8% (24 strains) of B:15 isolates. The B:15:P1.12 strains belonged to the electrophoretic type 5 (ET-5) complex, but 17 (71%) strains were a new clone (ET-5c) not found elsewhere in the world. All but one strain of ET-5c were responsible for a localized outbreak of systemic meningococcal disease in western Norway. A novel monoclonal antibody (202,G-12), developed against the unknown variable region 2 on the class 1 protein of one of these strains, bound to 19 of the 15:P1.12 strains, 4 strains bound the subtype P1.13 reference monoclonal antibody MN24H10.75, and the remaining strain showed no reaction. Sequencing of porA genes demonstrated a series of nine threonine residues in the deduced variable region 2 of the latter strain, while four and five threonine residues were found in the corresponding regions of strains reacting with the monoclonal antibodies 202,G-12 and MN24H10.75, respectively. Epitope mapping with synthetic peptides showed that 202,G-12 bound to a sequence of 11 amino acids which included the four threonine residues specific for subtype P1.13a. Immunoglobulin G antibodies against the P1.7,16 subtype protein, induced in volunteers after vaccination with the Norwegian meningococcal vaccine, did not cross-react on immunoblots with the subtype protein of clone ET-5c. Thus, postvaccination class 1 protein antibodies, assumed to be protective, may not be effective against infection with the new clone.
Notes
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PubMed ID
7664178 View in PubMed
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Immunogenicity of two efficacious outer membrane protein-based serogroup B meningococcal vaccines among young adults in Iceland.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature72607
Source
J Infect Dis. 1998 Mar;177(3):683-91
Publication Type
Article
Date
Mar-1998
Author
B A Perkins
K. Jonsdottir
H. Briem
E. Griffiths
B D Plikaytis
E A Hoiby
E. Rosenqvist
J. Holst
H. Nokleby
F. Sotolongo
G. Sierra
H C Campa
G M Carlone
D. Williams
J. Dykes
D. Kapczynski
E. Tikhomirov
J D Wenger
C V Broome
Author Affiliation
Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, Atlanta, Georgia 30333, USA. BAP4@cdc.gov
Source
J Infect Dis. 1998 Mar;177(3):683-91
Date
Mar-1998
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Analysis of Variance
Bacterial Outer Membrane Proteins - immunology - therapeutic use
Bacterial Vaccines - immunology - therapeutic use
Blood Bactericidal Activity
Carrier state
Comparative Study
Enzyme-Linked Immunosorbent Assay
Female
Follow-Up Studies
Humans
Iceland
Male
Meningococcal Infections - prevention & control
Neisseria meningitidis - classification - immunology
Research Design
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Serotyping
Abstract
Serum bactericidal activity (SBA) and ELISA antibody levels elicited by two efficacious serogroup B meningococcal vaccines were measured in a controlled trial involving 408 15- to 20-year-olds. Subjects were given two doses at a 6-week interval of a serogroup B or control vaccine. Response was defined as > or = 4-fold rise in antibody level. After two doses of the Finlay Institute (Havana) vaccine at 12 months, the proportions of SBA and ELISA responders were not different from those of the control group (15% and 17% [vaccine] vs. 13% and 9% [control], P > .05). After two doses of the National Institute of Public Health (Oslo) vaccine, there were more SBA and ELISA responders than in the control group (47% and 34% [vaccine] vs. 10% and 1% [control]) or the Finlay Institute vaccine group (P
PubMed ID
9498448 View in PubMed
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Measurement of antibodies against meningococcal capsular polysaccharides B and C in enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays: towards an improved surveillance of meningococcal disease.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature34295
Source
Clin Diagn Lab Immunol. 1997 May;4(3):345-51
Publication Type
Article
Date
May-1997
Author
J. Andersen
L. Berthelsen
I. Lind
Author Affiliation
Neisseria Department, Statens Serum Institut, Copenhagen S., Denmark.
Source
Clin Diagn Lab Immunol. 1997 May;4(3):345-51
Date
May-1997
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Aged
Antibodies, Bacterial - analysis - blood
Antigens, Bacterial
Child
Child, Preschool
Denmark - epidemiology
Enzyme-Linked Immunosorbent Assay - methods
Humans
Immunoglobulin G - blood
Immunoglobulin M - blood
Infant
Meningitis, Meningococcal - epidemiology - immunology
Meningococcal Infections - epidemiology - immunology
Middle Aged
Neisseria meningitidis - classification - immunology
Polysaccharides, Bacterial - immunology
Serotyping
Abstract
In order to improve the surveillance of serogroup B and C meningococcal diseases, enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays (ELISAs) specific for anti-B immunoglobulin M (IgM) and anti-C IgM and IgG antibodies were developed. The tests were evaluated by using paired sera from 122 patients with and 101 patients without laboratory evidence of meningococcal disease. Fifty-three of 67 patients (79%) with culture-confirmed serogroup B disease had an anti-B IgM antibody response; anti-B IgM levels waned rapidly in children 4 years of age had intermediate anti-B IgM titers. In contrast, only 1 and 5% of these patients had intermediate titers of anti-C IgM and anti-C IgG, respectively. The ELISAs were shown to be powerful tools for discriminating between serogroup B and C diseases in 96 to 100% of culture-confirmed cases. For 90% of patients with culture-negative meningococcal disease, a serogroup-specific diagnosis could be established by examination of paired sera in the ELISAs. As serogroup B and C meningococci account for practically all cases of meningococcal disease in industrialized countries, the availability of these tests may improve surveillance and prevention.
PubMed ID
9144375 View in PubMed
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Meningococcal disease in Canada: surveillance summary to 1987.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature230157
Source
CMAJ. 1989 Sep 15;141(6):567-9
Publication Type
Article
Date
Sep-15-1989
Author
P V Varughese
Author Affiliation
Disease Surveillance Division, Centre for Disease Control, Tunney's Pasture, Ottawa, Ont.
Source
CMAJ. 1989 Sep 15;141(6):567-9
Date
Sep-15-1989
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Bacterial Vaccines - administration & dosage
Canada
Child
Child, Preschool
Female
Humans
Infant
Male
Meningococcal Infections - complications - epidemiology - mortality - prevention & control
Neisseria meningitidis - classification - immunology - isolation & purification
Time Factors
Abstract
Meningococcal disease continues to occur in most parts of Canada at endemic levels, with minor fluctuations. The incidence in general has changed very little over the past three decades. It is primarily a childhood infection, occurring most commonly among infants less than 1 year of age. In 1987 the risk of infection among infants in that age group was 4 times and among those aged 1 to 4 years 2.5 times that of the general population. The most susceptible appear to be infants about 3 months of age. The annual CFRs had exceeded 50% before the antibiotic era, but with early diagnosis, modern therapy and supportive measures they have been less than 10%. A revised form for reporting cases, currently being considered by provincial epidemiologists across Canada, could help to provide more clinical and epidemiologic information.
Notes
Cites: NIPH Ann. 1983 Dec;6(2):133-86427703
PubMed ID
2505917 View in PubMed
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[Meningococcal disease in the Netherlands; after low tide another high tide?].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature240703
Source
Ned Tijdschr Geneeskd. 1984 Mar 17;128(11):515-8
Publication Type
Article
Date
Mar-17-1984

Novel quadrivalent meningococcal A, C, W-135 and Y glycoconjugate vaccine for the broader protection of adolescents and adults.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature138841
Source
Future Microbiol. 2010 Nov;5(11):1629-40
Publication Type
Article
Date
Nov-2010
Author
David Pace
Author Affiliation
Department of Paediatrics, Mater Dei Hospital, Tal-Qroqq, Msida, Malta. dpace@go.net.mt
Source
Future Microbiol. 2010 Nov;5(11):1629-40
Date
Nov-2010
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Aged
Canada - epidemiology
Child
Clinical Trials as Topic
Europe - epidemiology
Humans
Meningitis, Meningococcal - epidemiology - microbiology - prevention & control
Meningococcal Infections - epidemiology - microbiology - prevention & control
Meningococcal Vaccines - administration & dosage - immunology
Middle Aged
Neisseria meningitidis - classification - immunology
Sepsis - epidemiology - microbiology - prevention & control
United States - epidemiology
Vaccination - methods
Vaccines, Conjugate - immunology
Young Adult
Abstract
Meningococcal meningitis and septicemia are a persistent public health concern owing to the associated mortality and devastating long-term sequelae. People of all ages may be affected, with the disease burden being higher in at-risk groups. Vaccination is the most rational approach to the prevention of invasive meningococcal disease. A novel quadrivalent meningococcal (Men) serogroup A, C, W-135 and Y polysaccharide-protein conjugate vaccine (MenACWY-CRM), has recently been licensed for use in individuals aged at least 11 years old in the USA, Canada and Europe. One dose of MenACWY-CRM is well tolerated, and induces robust immunity to all constituent vaccine serogroups in 11-65 year old individuals. MenACWY-CRM was found to be noninferior to the quadrivalent meningococcal ACWY-diphtheria toxoid glycoconjugate vaccine, which is also licensed in the USA and Canada. In Europe, MenACWY-CRM is the first quadrivalent meningococcal glycoconjugate vaccine available to provide broader protection against Neisseria meningitidis serogroups A, C, W-135 and Y.
PubMed ID
21133685 View in PubMed
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[Occurrence of complement defects in meningococcal disease: who should be examined?].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature226508
Source
Ugeskr Laeger. 1991 Apr 15;153(16):1113-6
Publication Type
Article
Date
Apr-15-1991
Author
H E Nielsen
P. Magnussen
I. Lind
Author Affiliation
Statens Seruminstitut, København.
Source
Ugeskr Laeger. 1991 Apr 15;153(16):1113-6
Date
Apr-15-1991
Language
Danish
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Complement System Proteins - deficiency - genetics
Humans
Meningitis, Meningococcal - genetics - immunology
Neisseria meningitidis - classification - immunology
Recurrence
Scandinavia - epidemiology
Serotyping
Abstract
Congenital complement deficiency states occur very rarely. These deficiencies are associated with a high risk of meningococcal disease (MD). We suggest that the following groups of individuals with MD are examined for complement deficiencies: 1. Individuals belonging to families, in which more than one case of MD has occurred with an interval exceeding one month. 2. Individuals infected with the low-virulent meningococcal serogroups W-135, 29E, X, Y, Z. 3. Individuals with recurrent MD. Since properdin deficiency probably is the most common deficiency associated with MD it is important that the screening includes the alternative complement pathway.
PubMed ID
1902602 View in PubMed
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Restriction fingerprinting and serology in a small outbreak of B15 meningococcal disease among Norwegian soldiers.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature239666
Source
Scand J Infect Dis. 1985;17(1):19-24
Publication Type
Article
Date
1985
Author
B E Kristiansen
B. Sørensen
O. Spanne
B. Bjorvatn
Source
Scand J Infect Dis. 1985;17(1):19-24
Date
1985
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Antibodies, Bacterial - analysis
Carrier State - immunology - microbiology
DNA Restriction Enzymes
DNA, Bacterial - analysis
Disease Outbreaks
Humans
Immunoglobulin G - analysis
Immunoglobulin M - analysis
Male
Meningococcal Infections - epidemiology - immunology - microbiology - transmission
Military Medicine
Neisseria meningitidis - classification - immunology - isolation & purification
Norway
Pharynx - microbiology
Sepsis - immunology - microbiology
Serotyping
Abstract
In September 1981 a soldier died from meningococcal septicemia in a military camp in Mid-Norway. Soon afterwards one of his room-mates was transferred to a military camp in Northern-Norway where he shared sleeping quarters (room 7D) with 5 other soldiers of whom 2 fell ill with meningococcal disease 1 month later. Throat cultures were obtained from all 128 soldiers at the military camp in Northern-Norway; 41 (32%) harboured meningococci in their throats. The 3 invasive isolates and the isolates from the 4 healthy carriers at room 7D were all group B and type 15 meningococci. However, by DNA fingerprinting we could identify at least 2, probably 3, different individual strains among these 7 isolates. None of these strains were isolated from soldiers outside room 7D. By use of a B15 whole-bacterium ELISA method we showed that the levels of antimeningococcal IgG antibodies in the sera of the two cases at room 7D were low (18 and 28 OD units) compared with the mean IgG levels in the sera of their 4 healthy room mates (1150 OD units) and the mean IgG in the sera from all healthy soldiers (472 OD units).
PubMed ID
2986281 View in PubMed
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12 records – page 1 of 2.