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Characterization of epidemic and nonepidemic Neisseria meningitidis serogroup A strains from Sudan and Sweden.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature37611
Source
J Clin Microbiol. 1990 Aug;28(8):1711-9
Publication Type
Article
Date
Aug-1990
Author
M A Salih
D. Danielsson
A. Bäckman
D A Caugant
M. Achtman
P. Olcén
Author Affiliation
Department of Paediatrics and Child Health, Faculty of Medicine, University of Khartoum, Sudan.
Source
J Clin Microbiol. 1990 Aug;28(8):1711-9
Date
Aug-1990
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Antigenic Variation - genetics
Bacterial Outer Membrane Proteins - genetics
Child
Disease Outbreaks
Fimbriae, Bacterial - immunology
Genotype
Humans
Lipopolysaccharides - genetics
Meningitis - epidemiology - genetics - immunology
Neisseria meningitidis - classification - genetics - immunology
Phenotype
Prevalence
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Restriction Mapping
Sudan - epidemiology
Sweden - epidemiology
Abstract
A random selection of 25 strains isolated during an epidemic caused by serogroup A Neisseria meningitidis in Sudan (1988), 3 preepidemic meningococcal strains (1985), and 26 serogroup A strains isolated from sporadic cases of meningitis in Sweden (1973 to 1987) were assessed for multilocus enzyme genotypes (ETs), DNA restriction enzyme patterns, outer membrane proteins, lipopolysaccharides, pilus formation, and antibiograms. All of the 25 Sudanese epidemic isolates and 22 of the Swedish strains were of the same or closely related ETs (ETs 3, 4, and 5), corresponding to clone III-1, which has been responsible for two pandemic waves in the last three decades. The earlier pandemic involved Scandinavia, and the last one caused an outbreak during the pilgrimage to Mecca, Saudi Arabia (August 1987), spreading to Sudan, Chad, and Ethiopia. The three Sudanese preepidemic isolates (1985) were clone IV-1 (sulfonamide susceptible), which has been resident in the African meningitis belt for the last 25 years. The uniformity of clone III-1 strains (all sulfonamide resistant) from Sudan and Sweden was confirmed by DNA restriction enzyme patterns. ETs 3, 4, and 5 from Sudan and Sweden had 86 to 100% similarity to a Swedish clone III-1 reference strain, whereas ETs 1, 2, 6, and 7 showed 50 to 80% similarity. Class 1 protein for clone III-1 showed serosubtype antigens P1.9 and P1.x, whereas ET6 strains (clone IV-1) had serosubtype P1.7. Lipopolysaccharides were variable in the Sudanese and Swedish strains. Pili were expressed in all clone III-1 isolates from Sudan and Sweden but in none of the clone IV-1 isolates (Sudan, 1985).
PubMed ID
1975593 View in PubMed
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Genetic and antigenic characterization of invasive endemic serogroup B Neisseria meningitidis from Ontario, Canada, in 2001-2010.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature120118
Source
J Med Microbiol. 2013 Jan;62(Pt 1):46-55
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jan-2013
Author
Frances B Jamieson
Prasad Rawte
Shelley L Deeks
Jianwei Zhou
Dennis K S Law
Saul Deng
Raymond S W Tsang
Author Affiliation
Public Health Ontario Laboratory, Public Health Ontario, Canada. frances.jamieson@oahpp.ca
Source
J Med Microbiol. 2013 Jan;62(Pt 1):46-55
Date
Jan-2013
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Antigens, Bacterial - genetics
Bacterial Proteins - genetics - metabolism
Cluster analysis
Endemic Diseases
Gene Expression Regulation, Bacterial - physiology
Genetic Variation
Genotype
Humans
Meningococcal Infections - epidemiology - microbiology
Neisseria meningitidis - classification - genetics - immunology - isolation & purification
Ontario - epidemiology
Serotyping
Time Factors
Abstract
This study examined the antigenic and genetic diversity of serogroup B Neisseria meningitidis (MenB) recovered from invasive meningococcal disease (IMD) cases in Ontario, Canada, over the period 2001-2010 during which no MenB outbreaks had occurred. MenB was found to be responsible for 39 % of all IMD cases, with the remaining cases caused mainly by serogroups Y (28 %), C (23.5 %) and W135 (8 %). One hundred and ninety-three individual MenB case isolates were collected and characterized. Of the 88 sequence types (STs) identified, 75 were grouped into 14 known clonal complexes (CCs), whilst 13 STs were not assigned to any known CC. Fifty-seven different PorA genotypes and 88 STs defined the diversity of invasive MenB in Ontario, which supported the endemic nature of MenB disease in Ontario. Despite the presence of the hypervirulent ST-41/44 and ST-32 CCs, no single ST was predominant and responsible for a large number of IMD cases. Although the Qu?bec outbreak clone of ST-269 was also found in Ontario, the 20 case isolates were genetically diverse: they grouped into seven STs and did not have a predominant PorA genotype. eburst analysis identified a new CC responsible for 14.5 % of the MenB case isolates. The six most common PorA variable region 2 (VR2) genotypes (VR2-9, -4, -14, -16, -13-1 and -16-3) were found in 67 % of invasive MenB isolates.
PubMed ID
23038803 View in PubMed
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Genotypic and phenotypic characterization of carriage and invasive disease isolates of Neisseria meningitidis in Finland.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature129160
Source
J Clin Microbiol. 2012 Feb;50(2):264-73
Publication Type
Article
Date
Feb-2012
Author
Ulla Jounio
Annika Saukkoriipi
Holly B Bratcher
Aini Bloigu
Raija Juvonen
Sylvi Silvennoinen-Kassinen
Ari Peitso
Terttu Harju
Olli Vainio
Markku Kuusi
Martin C J Maiden
Maija Leinonen
Helena Käyhty
Maija Toropainen
Author Affiliation
Institute of Diagnostics, Department of Medical Microbiology, University of Oulu, Oulu, Finland. ujounio@paju.oulu.fi
Source
J Clin Microbiol. 2012 Feb;50(2):264-73
Date
Feb-2012
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Carrier State - epidemiology - microbiology
Female
Finland - epidemiology
Human Experimentation
Humans
Male
Meningococcal Infections - epidemiology - microbiology
Military Personnel
Multilocus Sequence Typing
Neisseria meningitidis - classification - genetics - immunology - isolation & purification
Oropharynx - microbiology
Prevalence
Serotyping
Young Adult
Abstract
The relationship between carriage and the development of invasive meningococcal disease is not fully understood. We investigated the changes in meningococcal carriage in 892 military recruits in Finland during a nonepidemic period (July 2004 to January 2006) and characterized all of the oropharyngeal meningococcal isolates obtained (n = 215) by using phenotypic (serogrouping and serotyping) and genotypic (porA typing and multilocus sequence typing) methods. For comparison, 84 invasive meningococcal disease strains isolated in Finland between January 2004 and February 2006 were also analyzed. The rate of meningococcal carriage was significantly higher at the end of military service than on arrival (18% versus 2.2%; P
Notes
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PubMed ID
22135261 View in PubMed
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Immunogenicity of 2 serogroup B outer-membrane protein meningococcal vaccines: a randomized controlled trial in Chile.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature33358
Source
JAMA. 1999 Apr 28;281(16):1520-7
Publication Type
Article
Date
Apr-28-1999
Author
J W Tappero
R. Lagos
A M Ballesteros
B. Plikaytis
D. Williams
J. Dykes
L L Gheesling
G M Carlone
E A Høiby
J. Holst
H. Nøkleby
E. Rosenqvist
G. Sierra
C. Campa
F. Sotolongo
J. Vega
J. Garcia
P. Herrera
J T Poolman
B A Perkins
Author Affiliation
Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, Meningitis and Special Pathogens Branch, Atlanta, GA 30333, USA. jwt0@cdc.gov
Source
JAMA. 1999 Apr 28;281(16):1520-7
Date
Apr-28-1999
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Antibodies, Bacterial - biosynthesis
Antigens, Bacterial
Bacterial Outer Membrane Proteins
Bacterial Vaccines - immunology
Blood Bactericidal Activity
Child, Preschool
Chile
Double-Blind Method
Female
Humans
Immunodominant Epitopes
Infant
Male
Meningococcal Infections - prevention & control
Meningococcal Vaccines
Neisseria meningitidis - classification - genetics - immunology
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Serotyping
Abstract
CONTEXT: Meningococcal disease occurs worldwide, and serogroup B disease accounts for a large proportion of cases. Although persons younger than 4 years are at greatest risk for serogroup B meningococcal disease, vaccine efficacy has not been demonstrated in this age group. OBJECTIVE: To evaluate serum bactericidal activity (SBA) against homologous vaccine type strains and a heterologous Chilean epidemic strain of Neisseria meningitidis as a potential correlate for vaccine efficacy. DESIGN: Double-blind, randomized controlled trial conducted between March 14 and July 20, 1994. All blood samples were taken by December 1994. SETTING: Santiago, Chile, where a clonal serogroup B meningococcal disease epidemic began in 1993. PARTICIPANTS: Infants younger than 1 year (n = 187), children aged 2 to 4 years (n = 183), and adults aged 17 to 30 years (n = 173). INTERVENTION: Participants received 3 doses of outer-membrane protein (OMP) meningococcal vaccine developed in either Cuba or Norway or a control vaccine, with each dose given 2 months apart. Blood samples were obtained at baseline, prior to dose 3, and at 4 to 6 weeks after dose 3. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURE: Immune response, defined as a 4-fold or greater rise in SBA titer 4 to 6 weeks after dose 3 compared with prevaccination titer. RESULTS: Children and adult recipients of either meningococcal vaccine were more likely than controls to develop an immune response to the heterologous epidemic strain. After 3 doses of vaccine, 31% to 35% of children responded to the vaccine vs 5% to placebo; 37% to 60% of adults responded to vaccine vs 4% to placebo (P
Notes
Comment In: JAMA. 1999 Apr 28;281(16):1541-310227326
PubMed ID
10227322 View in PubMed
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Strain differentiation of Neisseria meningitidis by small-fragment restriction endonuclease analysis (SF-REA).

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature215919
Source
APMIS. 1995 Feb;103(2):147-53
Publication Type
Article
Date
Feb-1995
Author
H. Mylvaganam
O H Gilja
A. Halstensen
E A Høiby
A. Digranes
B. Bjorvatn
Author Affiliation
Centre for International Health, University of Bergen, Norway.
Source
APMIS. 1995 Feb;103(2):147-53
Date
Feb-1995
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Carrier state
DNA, Bacterial - genetics
Disease Outbreaks
Genetic Variation
Humans
Meningococcal Infections - drug therapy - epidemiology - immunology - microbiology
Neisseria meningitidis - classification - genetics - immunology
Norway - epidemiology
Ofloxacin - therapeutic use
Rural Population
Serotyping
Abstract
Following an outbreak involving 3 cases of serogroup B meningococcal disease in a rural part of Western Norway, 2 clinical and 99 carrier isolates of Neisseria meningitidis were examined by small-fragment restriction endonuclease analysis (SF-REA) using EcoRI, to determine its potential for strain differentiation. SF-REA characterized all isolates and provided reproducible results with acceptable inter-clonal differentiation. The results of SF-REA correlated well with those of serological typing and were used to determine clonal diversity and prevalence of invasive strains among the carrier isolates. SF-REA was also useful in demonstrating acquisition of a new carrier strain after eradication of the initial strain by ofloxacin. Thirty-one different restriction patterns/pattern complexes were recognized among the 101 isolates. The two clinical isolates had identical restriction patterns and showed > or = 90% similarity to those of six carrier isolates. In three out of six apparent treatment failures, successful eradication of the original strain by ofloxacin was demonstrated by SF-REA. SF-REA proved valuable in strain differentiation of Neisseria meningitidis, complemented serology, and characterized all isolates which could not be typified by serology.
PubMed ID
7748539 View in PubMed
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