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Absence of prolyliminopeptidase-negative Neisseria gonorroeae strains in Ontario, Canada.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature158707
Source
Can Commun Dis Rep. 2008 Jan;34(1):20-3
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jan-2008
Author
S. Brown
P. Rawte
L. Towns
F. Jamieson
R S W Tsang
Author Affiliation
Ontario Ministry of Health and Long Term Care, Central Public Health Laboratory, Etobicoke, Ontario, Canada.
Source
Can Commun Dis Rep. 2008 Jan;34(1):20-3
Date
Jan-2008
Language
English
French
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aminopeptidases
Gonorrhea - diagnosis - enzymology
Humans
Neisseria gonorrhoeae - enzymology
Ontario - epidemiology
PubMed ID
18286745 View in PubMed
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Acquired macrolide resistance genes in pathogenic Neisseria spp. isolated between 1940 and 1987.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature182672
Source
Antimicrob Agents Chemother. 2003 Dec;47(12):3877-80
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-2003
Author
Sydney Cousin
William L H Whittington
Marilyn C Roberts
Author Affiliation
Department of Pathobiology, University of Washington, Seattle, Washington 98195, USA.
Source
Antimicrob Agents Chemother. 2003 Dec;47(12):3877-80
Date
Dec-2003
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Anti-Bacterial Agents - pharmacology
Conjugation, Genetic
Denmark - epidemiology
Drug Resistance, Bacterial
Genes, Bacterial - genetics
Genotype
Gonorrhea - epidemiology - microbiology
Humans
In Situ Hybridization
Meningococcal Infections - epidemiology - microbiology
Methyltransferases - genetics
Neisseria gonorrhoeae - drug effects - genetics
Neisseria meningitidis - drug effects - genetics
Promoter Regions, Genetic - genetics
Reverse Transcriptase Polymerase Chain Reaction
Time Factors
Abstract
Seventy-six Neisseria gonorrhoeae isolates, isolated between 1940 and 1987, and seven Neisseria meningitidis isolates, isolated between 1963 and 1987, were screened for the presence of acquired mef(A), erm(B), erm(C), and erm(F) genes by using DNA-DNA hybridization, PCR analysis, and sequencing. The mef(A), erm(B), and erm(F) genes were all identified in a 1955 N. gonorrhoeae isolate, while the erm(C) gene was identified in a 1963 N. gonorrhoeae isolate. Similarly, both the mef(A) and erm(F) genes were identified in a 1963 N. meningitidis isolate. All four acquired genes were found in later isolates of both species. The mef(A) gene from a 1975 N. gonorrhoeae isolate was sequenced and had 100% DNA and amino acid identity with the mef(A) gene from a 1990s Streptococcus pneumoniae isolate. Selected early isolates were able to transfer their acquired genes to an Enterococcus faecalis recipient, suggesting that these genes are associated with conjugative transposons. These isolates are the oldest of any species to carry the mef(A) gene and among the oldest to carry these erm genes.
Notes
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PubMed ID
14638497 View in PubMed
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Analysis of Neisseria gonorrhoeae in Ontario, Canada, with decreased susceptibility to quinolones by pulsed-field gel electrophoresis, auxotyping, serotyping and plasmid content.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature208613
Source
J Med Microbiol. 1997 May;46(5):383-90
Publication Type
Article
Date
May-1997
Author
N. Harnett
S. Brown
G. Riley
R. Terro
C. Krishnan
M. Pauzé
K H Yeung
Author Affiliation
Central Public Health Laboratory, Ontario Ministry of Health, Toronto, Canada.
Source
J Med Microbiol. 1997 May;46(5):383-90
Date
May-1997
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
4-Quinolones
Anti-Infective Agents - pharmacology
Bacterial Typing Techniques
DNA, Bacterial - analysis
Electrophoresis, Gel, Pulsed-Field
Gonorrhea - epidemiology - microbiology
Humans
Incidence
Microbial Sensitivity Tests
Neisseria gonorrhoeae - classification - drug effects
Ontario - epidemiology
Plasmids
Restriction Mapping
Serotyping
Abstract
The incidence of Neisseria gonorrhoeae with reduced susceptibility to quinolones increased from 0.18% (63 of 3285) in 1992 to 0.56% (15 of 2663) in 1993 and 0.62% (46 of 2846) in 1994. In all, 65 of the 67 isolates of Neisseria gonorrhoeae with decreased susceptibility to quinolones were characterised by pulsed-field gel electrophoresis (PFGE), auxotyping, serotyping and plasmid content. The strains were distributed among 14 auxotype/serovar (A/S) classes. Thirty isolates (46.2%) which were penicillin-susceptible with ciprofloxacin MIC90 of 0.12 mg/L and norfloxacin MIC90 of 1.0 mg/L belonged to a single A/S class, OUHL/IA-2. All but two of the 30 isolates had identical PFGE restriction profiles with NheI restriction endonuclease. Fifteen isolates (23.1%) with MICs in the intermediate (or resistant) categories for penicillin and with ciprofloxacin and norfloxacin MIC90 of 0.25 and 4.0 mg/L and (0.5 and 4.0 mg/L) respectively, belonged to A/S class P/IB-1. The 15 isolates showed nine different patterns with NheI and eight patterns with SpeI restriction endonucleases. Two of three beta-lactamase-producing (PPNG) isolates belonged to A/S class P/IB-5 and had a dissimilar PFGE restriction profile with NheI endonuclease; the other isolate belonged to A/S class P/IB-8. The remaining 17 isolates were distributed among 11 A/S classes. Three isolates within the common A/S class NR/IB-1 were subdivided into two types by PFGE as were three isolates belonging to A/S class NR/IB-2. Overall the 65 isolates of N. gonorrhoeae were distributed into 30 NheI and 26 SpeI macrorestriction profiles. All but one isolate harboured the 2.6-MDa cryptic plasmid and 18 isolates carried the 24.5-MDa transferable plasmid. The three PPNG isolates carried the 4.5-MDa Asian beta-lactamase-producing plasmid and a 25.2-MDa conjugative plasmid was found in the two TRNG isolates.
PubMed ID
9152033 View in PubMed
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Analysis of serovar distribution as a tool in epidemiological studies in gonorrhoea.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature237936
Source
Acta Derm Venereol. 1986;66(4):325-33
Publication Type
Article
Date
1986
Author
A K Rudén
M. Bäckman
S. Bygdeman
A. Jonsson
O. Ringertz
E. Sandström
Source
Acta Derm Venereol. 1986;66(4):325-33
Date
1986
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Antibodies, Monoclonal - immunology
Epitopes - analysis
Female
Gonorrhea - epidemiology - microbiology
Homosexuality
Humans
Male
Neisseria gonorrhoeae - classification - isolation & purification
Sex Factors
Sweden
Abstract
During one year 738 gonococcal isolates from 731 consecutive patients with gonorrhoea were collected and classified by co-agglutination using W I and W II/III specific monoclonal antibodies. Eight W I and 30 W II/III serovars (serovariants) were seen. In both serogroups the most frequent serovar among isolates from women and heterosexual men differed from that among isolates from homosexual men. Forty-two per cent of the serovars, were confined only to one subpopulation, i.e. women, heterosexual men or homosexual men, representing 19 (3%) of the 738 isolates. Out of these 19 isolates 42% were acquired abroad compared with 12% of the 653 isolates in the serovars shared between two or all three subpopulations (p less than 0.005). Imported W I isolates were often of the same serovar that dominated in Stockholm. W II/III isolates acquired abroad were often of unusual serovars (p less than 0.0005) and might be a source of future changes of the serovar pattern in Sweden. In this way we can follow the introduction of new serovars into our society and their circulation between the subpopulations.
PubMed ID
2430404 View in PubMed
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Analysis of the contribution of molecular mechanisms into formation of gonoccocal resistance to tetracycline.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature157397
Source
Bull Exp Biol Med. 2007 Sep;144(3):432-7
Publication Type
Article
Date
Sep-2007
Author
A D Borovskaya
M V Malakhova
V A Vereshchagin
E N Il'ina
V M Govorun
T V Priputnevich
N. Al-Hafagi
A A Kubanova
Author Affiliation
Institute of Physicochemical Medicine, Central Research Dermatovenerological Institute, Moscow.
Source
Bull Exp Biol Med. 2007 Sep;144(3):432-7
Date
Sep-2007
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Anti-Bacterial Agents - pharmacology - therapeutic use
Genetic markers
Genotype
Gonorrhea - drug therapy - microbiology
Humans
Mutation
Neisseria gonorrhoeae - drug effects - genetics - metabolism - pathogenicity
Russia
Tetracycline - pharmacology - therapeutic use
Tetracycline Resistance - genetics
Abstract
We applied complex genetic analysis for evaluation of tetracycline-resistance markers in 129 clinical strains of Neisseria gonorrhoeae from Central, Privolzhskii, and Siberian regions. For detection of mutations in rpsJ gene and MtrRCDE locus we first used minisequence reaction followed by identification of products by MALDI-TOF mass spectrometry. The incidence of detection of resistance markers among the analyzed strains were: tetM--3.1%, mutations in genes rpsJ--82.2%, penB--62.8%, and mtrR--54.3%. The analyzed genetic markers were not detected in 17.5% strains. tetM gene was detected in only 12.5% strains from the Central Region. No differences were revealed in regional distribution of other genotypes. Genotypes tetM(pres), rpsJ(mut), mtrR(mut), and rpsJ(mut), penB(mut), mtrR(mut) reliably predict tetracycline resistance. Microbiological and genetic testing of tetracycline resistance yielded similar results.
PubMed ID
18457051 View in PubMed
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Anatomic distribution of Neisseria gonorrhoeae, Chlamydia trachomatis and Mycoplasma genitalium infections in men who have sex with men.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature113225
Source
Sex Health. 2013 Jul;10(3):199-203
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jul-2013
Author
N. Reinton
H. Moi
A O Olsen
N. Zarabyan
J. Bjerner
T M Tønseth
A. Moghaddam
Author Affiliation
Fürst Medisinsk Laboratorium, Søren Bulls vei 25, N-1051 Oslo, Norway. amoghaddam@furst.no
Source
Sex Health. 2013 Jul;10(3):199-203
Date
Jul-2013
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Chlamydia Infections - diagnosis - epidemiology
Chlamydia trachomatis - isolation & purification
Genitalia, Male - microbiology
Gonorrhea - diagnosis - epidemiology
Homosexuality, Male
Humans
Male
Mycoplasma Infections - diagnosis - epidemiology
Mycoplasma genitalium - isolation & purification
Neisseria gonorrhoeae - isolation & purification
Norway
Oropharynx - microbiology
Prevalence
Rectum - microbiology
Abstract
New cases of gonorrhoea (Neisseria gonorrhoeae) and chlamydia (Chlamydia trachomatis) infections have been steadily increasing in Scandinavian countries over the last decade. There is a particular urgency in reducing new infections as isolation of multiple drug resistant strains of gonorrhoea is becoming more frequent. The aim of this study was to determine the prevalence and sites of infection of common sexually transmissible infections (STIs) in men who have sex with men (MSM).
We have performed a retrospective analysis of the three major STIs, gonorrhoea, chlamydia and Mycoplasma genitalium in urogenital, anorectal and oropharyngeal samples from MSM that attended two STI clinics in Oslo.
One hundred and thirty-six men (6.0%) out of 2289 MSM tested were found to be positive for gonorrhoea using a porA gene targeted nucleic acid amplification test (NAAT). Of these, 106 (77.9%) would not have been identified through testing first-void urine alone. Two hundred and twenty eight (10.0%) patients from 2289 tested were found to be positive for chlamydia, 164 (71.9%) of which were identified through anorectal specimens. Ninety-one (5.1%) patients from 1778 tested were found to be positive for M. genitalium, with 65 (71.4%) identified through testing of anorectal specimens.
Our results supports the European findings that the MSM population carries a high burden of STIs and that testing the anorectum and oropharynx will identify a significantly higher percentage of infected patients and reservoirs of STIs.
PubMed ID
23751932 View in PubMed
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An epidemiological survey of chlamydial and gonococcal infections in a Canadian arctic community.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature90552
Source
Sex Transm Dis. 2009 Feb;36(2):79-83
Publication Type
Article
Date
Feb-2009
Author
Steenbeek Audrey
Tyndall Mark
Sheps Samuel
Rothenberg Richard
Author Affiliation
School of Nursing, Dalhousie University, NS, Canada. a.steenbeek@dal.ca
Source
Sex Transm Dis. 2009 Feb;36(2):79-83
Date
Feb-2009
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Canada - epidemiology
Chlamydia Infections - epidemiology - ethnology - prevention & control
Chlamydia trachomatis
Contact Tracing
Cross-Sectional Studies
Female
Gonorrhea - epidemiology - ethnology - prevention & control
Humans
Interviews as Topic
Inuits
Male
Mass Screening - methods
Neisseria gonorrhoeae
Prevalence
Sexually Transmitted Diseases, Bacterial - epidemiology - ethnology - prevention & control
Young Adult
Abstract
BACKGROUND: Sexually transmitted infections are leading causes of morbidity for Canadian Aboriginal women. To date, very few initiatives have been successful in screening, treating, and limiting these infections among these populations. OBJECTIVES: To evaluate the efficacy of universal screening, treatment and contact tracing as a means of capturing a more accurate count of chlamydia and gonorrhea prevalence and limiting transmission among Inuit communities. METHODS: 181 participants were screened for chlamydia and gonorrhea and interviewed in a cross-sectional survey (Aug-Sept/03). Information was collected on demographics, use of health services, sexual histories and STI knowledge among others. A random sample (n = 100) from the cross-sectional group was selected for the longitudinal cohort. Individuals were followed every two months post baseline for four visits (Oct/03-May/04). At each visit, participants were screened for chlamydia/gonorrhea. All positive cases and their partners were treated and contact tracing completed. Logistic Regression analysis and the McNemar Test of Correlated Proportions were used to analyze the data. RESULTS: Overall, 35 cases of chlamydia were detected, with 21 detected at baseline and 14 during follow-up. The baseline prevalence was 11.6% in comparison with 2.7% that was previously estimated. No gonorrhea was detected. The strongest factor associated with a positive chlamydia was having recent STI (OR 9.82, CI: 2.70, 35.77). CONCLUSIONS: Consistent with the literature, the results support the use of universal screening followed by prompt treatment and contact tracing in populations with greater than 10% chlamydia prevalence.
PubMed ID
19125145 View in PubMed
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The antibiotic management of gonorrhoea in Ontario, Canada following multiple changes in guidelines: an interrupted time-series analysis.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature290374
Source
Sex Transm Infect. 2017 12; 93(8):561-565
Publication Type
Journal Article
Date
12-2017
Author
Catherine Dickson
Monica Taljaard
Dara Spatz Friedman
Gila Metz
Tom Wong
Jeremy M Grimshaw
Author Affiliation
Medical Resident,School of Epidemiology, Public Health and Preventive Medicine, University of Ottawa, Alta Vista Campus Room, Ottawa, Canada.
Source
Sex Transm Infect. 2017 12; 93(8):561-565
Date
12-2017
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Keywords
Female
Gonorrhea - drug therapy - epidemiology
Guideline Adherence
Humans
Interrupted Time Series Analysis
Male
Microbial Sensitivity Tests
Neisseria gonorrhoeae - drug effects
Ontario - epidemiology
Practice Guidelines as Topic
Public Health
Abstract
This study assessed adherence with first-line gonorrhoea treatment recommendations in Ontario, Canada, following recent guideline changes due to antibiotic resistance.
We used interrupted times-series analyses to analyse treatment data for cases of uncomplicated gonorrhoea reported in Ontario, Canada, between January 2006 and May 2014. We assessed adherence with first-line treatment according to the guidelines in place at the time and the use of specific antibiotics over time. We used the introduction of new recommendations in the Canadian Guidelines for Sexually Transmitted Infections in 2008 and 2011 and the release of the province of Ontario's Guidelines for the Treatment and Management of Gonococcal Infections in Ontario in 2013 as interruptions in the time-series analysis.
Overall, 34?287 gonorrhoea cases were reported between 1 January 2006 and 31 May 2014. Treatment data were available for 32?312 (94.2%). Our analysis included 32?272 (94.1%) cases without either a conjunctival or disseminated infection. Following the release of the 2011 recommendations, adherence with first-line recommendations immediately decreased to below 30%. Adherence slowly increased but did not reach baseline levels before the 2013 guidelines were released. Following release of the 2013 guidelines, adherence again decreased; adherence is slowly recovering but by May 2014, was only approximately 60%.
Due to concerns about antibiotic resistance, gonorrhoea treatment guidelines need to be updated regularly and rapidly adopted in practice. Our study showed poor adherence following dissemination of updated guidelines. Over a year after the latest Ontario guidelines were released, 40% of patients did not receive first-line treatment, putting them at risk of treatment failure and potentially promoting further drug resistance. Greater attention should be devoted to dissemination and implementation of new guidelines.
PubMed ID
28844044 View in PubMed
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Antibiotic sensitivities of Neisseria gonorrhoeae in the Toronto area.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature253345
Source
Can Med Assoc J. 1974 Jul 6;111(1):44-6
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jul-6-1974
Author
K F Givan
A. Keyl
Source
Can Med Assoc J. 1974 Jul 6;111(1):44-6
Date
Jul-6-1974
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Anti-Bacterial Agents - pharmacology
Cephaloridine - pharmacology
Erythromycin - pharmacology
Female
Gonorrhea - drug therapy - microbiology
Humans
Male
Microbial Sensitivity Tests
Neisseria gonorrhoeae - drug effects - isolation & purification
Ontario
Penicillin G Procaine - therapeutic use
Penicillin resistance
Spectinomycin - pharmacology - therapeutic use
Tetracycline - pharmacology - therapeutic use
Abstract
The antibiotic sensitivity pattern of 3872 isolates of N. gonorrhoeae tested in Toronto from 1969 to 1973 is reviewed. An increase in resistance to both penicillin and tetracycline was noted up to 1971, but no further increase has occurred since then. Ninety-seven percent of 135 patients with "sensitive" strains (inhibited by 0.3 U/ml of penicillin and/or 0.5 mug/ml of tetracycline) were cured by either 8 g of tetracycline or 5,000,000 U of penicillin, whereas only 59% of 58 patients with "resistant" strains (requiring 1.0 U/ml of penicillin and/or 2.0 mug/ml of tetracycline for inhibition) were cured by the same dosage. Spectinomycin appears to be an acceptable alternative therapy. Maximum doses of the chosen drug are recommended in the hope of retarding further spread of more resistant organisms.
Notes
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PubMed ID
4276273 View in PubMed
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199 records – page 1 of 20.