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146 records – page 1 of 15.

Source
Can Nurse. 2000 Sep;96(8):18-22
Publication Type
Article
Date
Sep-2000
Author
M. Fletcher
Source
Can Nurse. 2000 Sep;96(8):18-22
Date
Sep-2000
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aged
Canada
Elder Abuse - diagnosis - prevention & control
Humans
Negotiating
Nursing Assessment
PubMed ID
11865607 View in PubMed
Less detail

Achieving therapeutic clarity in assisted personal body care: professional challenges in interactions with severely ill COPD patients.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature155622
Source
J Clin Nurs. 2008 Aug;17(16):2155-63
Publication Type
Article
Date
Aug-2008
Author
Kirsten Lomborg
Marit Kirkevold
Author Affiliation
Department of Nursing Science, Institute of Public Health, Aarhus University, Aarhus, Denmark. kl@nursingscience.au.dk
Source
J Clin Nurs. 2008 Aug;17(16):2155-63
Date
Aug-2008
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Activities of Daily Living - psychology
Adaptation, Psychological
Adult
Attitude of Health Personnel
Baths - nursing - psychology
Clinical Competence
Communication
Denmark
Dyspnea - etiology
Helping Behavior
Hospitals, University
Humans
Middle Aged
Negotiating - psychology
Nurse's Role - psychology
Nurse-Patient Relations
Nursing Methodology Research
Nursing Staff, Hospital - education - organization & administration - psychology
Patient Care Planning - organization & administration
Patient Participation - methods - psychology
Pulmonary Disease, Chronic Obstructive - nursing - psychology
Qualitative Research
Questionnaires
Severity of Illness Index
Abstract
This paper aims to present a theoretical account of professional nursing challenges involved in providing care to patients suffering from chronic obstructive pulmonary disease. The study objectives are patients' and nurses' expectations, goals and approaches to assisted personal body care.
The provision of help with body care may have therapeutic qualities but there is only limited knowledge about the particularities and variations in specific groups of patients and the nurse-patient interactions required to facilitate patient functioning and well-being. For patients with severe chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, breathlessness represents a particular challenge in the performance of body care sessions.
We investigated nurse-patient interactions during assisted personal body care, using grounded theory with a symbolic interaction perspective and a constant comparative method.
Twelve cases of nurse-patient interactions were analysed. Data were based on participant observation, individual interviews with patients and nurses and a standardized questionnaire on patients' breathlessness.
Nurses and patients seemed to put effort into the interaction and wanted to find an appropriate way of conducting the body care session according to the patients' specific needs. Achieving therapeutic clarity in nurse-patient interactions appeared to be an important concern, mainly depending on interactions characterized by: (i) reaching a common understanding of the patient's current conditions and stage of illness trajectory, (ii) negotiating a common scope and structuring body care sessions and (iii) clarifying roles.
It cannot be taken for granted that therapeutic qualities are achieved when nurses provide assistance with body care. If body care should have healing strength, the actual body care activities and the achievement of therapeutic clarity in nurses' interaction with patients' appear to be crucial.
The paper proposes that patients' integrity and comfort in the body care session should be given first priority and raises attention to details that nurses should take into account when assisting severely ill patients.
PubMed ID
18710375 View in PubMed
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Alternatives for protecting privacy while respecting patient care and public health needs.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature80584
Source
Ethics Inf Technol. 1999;1(4):249-55
Publication Type
Article
Date
1999
Author
DeCew J W
Author Affiliation
Clark University, Worcester, MA, USA.
Source
Ethics Inf Technol. 1999;1(4):249-55
Date
1999
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Access to Information
Databases, Factual
European Union
Federal Government
Germany
Government Regulation
Guidelines
Humans
Informed consent
Internet
Medical Records
Medical Records Systems, Computerized - legislation & jurisprudence - standards
Models, organizational
Negotiating
Privacy - legislation & jurisprudence
Private Sector
Public Policy
Security Measures
Social Control, Informal
Sweden
United States
Abstract
This paper begins with a discussion of the value of privacy, especially for medical records in an age of advancing technology. I then examine three alternative approaches to protection of medical records: reliance on governmental guidelines, the use of corporate self-regulation, and my own third hybrid view on how to maintain a presumption in favor of privacy with respect to medical information, safeguarding privacy as vigorously and comprehensively as possible, without sacrificing the benefits of new information technology in medicine. None of the three models I examine are unproblematic, yet it is crucial to weigh the strengths and weaknesses of these alternative approaches.
PubMed ID
16986224 View in PubMed
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An implementation study of the crisis resolution team model in Norway: are the crisis resolution teams fulfilling their role?

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature134533
Source
BMC Health Serv Res. 2011;11:96
Publication Type
Article
Date
2011
Author
Nina Hasselberg
Rolf W Gråwe
Sonia Johnson
Torleif Ruud
Author Affiliation
R&D Department, Mental Health Services, Akershus University Hospital and Institute of Clinical Medicine, University Oslo, Norway. nina.hasseberg@ahus.no
Source
BMC Health Serv Res. 2011;11:96
Date
2011
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Cluster analysis
Crisis Intervention - methods - statistics & numerical data
Female
Health Status Indicators
Humans
Male
Mental health
Mental health services
Middle Aged
Models, organizational
Models, Psychological
Negotiating - methods - psychology
Norway
Professional Role
Psychometrics - statistics & numerical data
Psychotic Disorders - therapy
Statistics, nonparametric
Young Adult
Abstract
The establishment of crisis resolution teams (CRTs) is part of the national mental health policy in several Western countries. The purpose of the present study is to describe characteristics of CRTs and their patients, explore the differences between CRTs, and examine whether the CRTs in Norway are organized according to the international CRT model.
The study was a naturalistic study of eight CRTs and 680 patients referred to these teams in Norway. Mental health problems were assessed using the Health of the Nation Outcome Scales (HoNOS), Global Assessment of Functioning Scales (GAF) and the International Statistical Classification of Diseases and Related Health Problems, 10th Revision (ICD-10).
None of the CRTs operated 24 hours a day, seven days a week (24/7 availability) or had gate-keeping functions for acute wards. The CRTs also treated patients who were not considered for hospital admission. Forty per cent of patients waited more than 24 hours for treatment. Fourteen per cent had psychotic symptoms, and 69% had affective symptoms. There were significant variations between teams in patients' total severity of symptoms and social problems, but no variations between teams with respect to patients' aggressive behaviour, non-accidental self-injury, substance abuse or psychotic symptoms. There was a tendency for teams operating extended hours to treat patients with more severe mental illnesses.
The CRT model has been implemented in Norway without a rapid response, gate-keeping function and 24/7 availability. These findings indicate that the CRTs do not completely fulfil their intended role in the mental health system.
Notes
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PubMed ID
21569226 View in PubMed
Less detail

Baby boomers as future care users--An analysis of expectations in print media.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature272016
Source
J Aging Stud. 2015 Aug;34:82-91
Publication Type
Article
Date
Aug-2015
Author
Håkan Jönson
Anders Jönsson
Source
J Aging Stud. 2015 Aug;34:82-91
Date
Aug-2015
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aged
Forecasting
Health services needs and demand
Health Services for the Aged - trends - utilization
Humans
Negotiating - psychology
Newspapers as Topic
Patient Acceptance of Health Care
Patient Participation - psychology
Population Growth
Self Concept
Social Identification
Sweden
Abstract
The aim of the study was to investigate media presentations of baby boomers as future care users. The Swedish baby boomer generation, born in the 1940s, and known as the '40s generation, has been characterized as youthful and powerful, and a question investigated in the study was whether boomers are supposed to display these characteristics as care users. We analyzed 481 articles in Swedish newspapers, published between 1995 and 2012, with a qualitative content analysis. The results showed that the '40s generation was predicted to become a new breed of demanding, self-aware care users. These claims were supported by descriptions of the formative events and typical characteristics of these individuals, which were then projected onto their future behavior as care users. Such projections tended to portray contemporary care users as passive, submissive, and partly responsible for problems associated with elder care. Consequently, approaches that focus on differences between cohorts need to incorporate a constructionist dimension to highlight the problem of generationism.
PubMed ID
26162728 View in PubMed
Less detail

Benefits negotiation: three Swedish hospitals pursuit of potential electronic health record benefits.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature272395
Source
Int J Electron Healthc. 2013;7(3):248-68
Publication Type
Article
Date
2013
Author
John S Jeansson
Source
Int J Electron Healthc. 2013;7(3):248-68
Date
2013
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Electronic Health Records
Humans
Information Systems
Medical Records Systems, Computerized
Negotiating
Sweden
Systems Integration
Abstract
At the very heart of Swedish healthcare digitalisation are large investments in electronic health records (EHRs). These integrated information systems (ISs) carry promises of great benefits and value for organisations. However, realising IS benefits and value has, in general, proven to be a challenging task, and as organisations strive to formalise their realisation efforts a misconception of rationality threatens to emerge. This misconception manifests itself when the formality of analysis threatens to underrate the impact of social processes in deciding which potential benefits to pursue. This paper suggests that these decisions are the result of a social process of negotiation. The purpose of this paper is to observe three benefits analysis projects of three Swedish hospitals to better understand the character and management of proposed benefits negotiations. Findings depict several different categories of benefits negotiations, as well as key factors to consider during the benefits negotiation process.
PubMed ID
24191344 View in PubMed
Less detail

Best interests at end of life: an updated review of decisions made by the Consent and Capacity Board of Ontario.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature118233
Source
J Crit Care. 2013 Feb;28(1):22-7
Publication Type
Conference/Meeting Material
Article
Date
Feb-2013
Author
Paula Chidwick
Robert Sibbald
Laura Hawryluck
Author Affiliation
William Osler Health System, London Health Sciences Centre, Schulich School of Medicine and Dentistry, Western University, University Health Network, University of Toronto. Paula.chidwick@williamoslerhs.ca
Source
J Crit Care. 2013 Feb;28(1):22-7
Date
Feb-2013
Language
English
Publication Type
Conference/Meeting Material
Article
Keywords
Beneficence
Decision Making
Dissent and Disputes - legislation & jurisprudence
Governing Board
Humans
Negotiating
Ontario
Palliative Care - ethics - legislation & jurisprudence
Physician's Practice Patterns - ethics - legislation & jurisprudence
Terminal Care - ethics - legislation & jurisprudence
Third-Party Consent - ethics - legislation & jurisprudence
Withholding Treatment - ethics - legislation & jurisprudence
Abstract
To increase our understanding of the notion of "best interests" in end of life disagreements through an updated review of decisions made by the Consent and Capacity Board of Ontario. There was a significant increase (235%) in decisions from this tribunal between 2009 and 2011. "Best interests" test is used when no prior expressed wishes are known to the surrogate decision-makers.
Purposively sampled written decisions of the Consent and Capacity Board of Ontario between 2003 and 2011 that focused on the "best interests" of patients at the end of life. Interpretive content analysis was performed independently by 3 reviewers, and themes were identified by consensus.
We found substitute decision makers (SDMs) rely on an appeal to their own values or religion in their interpretation of best interests; physicians rely on clinical conditions; board emphasizes alignment with Health Care Consent Act. In the more recent cases, we found that SDMs report that patients value suffering; that SDMs have unrealistic hope for recovery and can communicate and get direction from the incapable patient; that SDMs need education on their role and responsibility as SDM; and that SDMs need time to provide consent, and that most proposed treatment plans that were sources of conflict included "palliative care."
Several lessons are drawn for the benefit of health care teams engaged in disagreements at end of life with SDMs over the best interests of patients.
PubMed ID
23228726 View in PubMed
Less detail

Beyond idealism and realism: Canadian NGO/government relations during the negotiation of the FCTC.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature145088
Source
J Public Health Policy. 2010 Apr;31(1):74-87
Publication Type
Article
Date
Apr-2010
Author
Raphael Lencucha
Ronald Labonté
Michael J Rouse
Author Affiliation
Institute of Population Health, University of Ottawa, 1 Stewart Street, Ottawa, Ontario, Canada. rlencuch@uottawa.ca
Source
J Public Health Policy. 2010 Apr;31(1):74-87
Date
Apr-2010
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Canada
Group Processes
Humans
Interinstitutional Relations
Interviews as Topic
Negotiating
Organizations
Policy Making
Public Health
Smoking Cessation - legislation & jurisprudence
Abstract
The Framework Convention on Tobacco Control (FCTC) marks a unique point in the history of global health governance. This convention produced the first legally binding treaty under the auspices of the World Health Organization. Another first was the extent to which non-governmental organizations (NGOs) participated in the negotiation process. This article explores the relationship between one group of NGOs and their respective government during the negotiation of the FCTC. Documentary analyses and 18 individual in-depth interviews were conducted with both government and NGO representatives. In contrast to the polar perspectives of idealism (NGOs as unique and autonomous) and realism (NGOs as funded arms of the government), our findings suggest that neither opposition nor conformity on the part of the NGOs characterize the relationship between the NGOs and government. While specific to the case under study (the FCTC), our findings nonetheless indicate the need for a nuanced view of the relationship between governments and NGOs, at least during the process of multilateral health policy negotiations.
PubMed ID
20200527 View in PubMed
Less detail

Brokering: a process for establishing long-term and stable links with gay male communities for research and public health education.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature218960
Source
AIDS Educ Prev. 1994 Feb;6(1):65-73
Publication Type
Article
Date
Feb-1994
Author
A J Silvestre
Author Affiliation
Department of Infectious Diseases and Microbiology, Graduate School of Public Health, University of Pittsburgh, PA.
Source
AIDS Educ Prev. 1994 Feb;6(1):65-73
Date
Feb-1994
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Bisexuality
Consumer Participation
Epidemiologic Methods
HIV Infections - epidemiology - prevention & control - transmission
Health Education - organization & administration
Homosexuality
Humans
Interinstitutional Relations
Longitudinal Studies
Male
Marketing of Health Services - organization & administration
Motivation
Negotiating
Patient compliance
Professional-Patient Relations
Public Health - education
Research
Abstract
The success of efforts to prevent continued transmission of the human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) and to increase compliance with HIV prophylactic interventions among homosexual and bisexual men will depend in part on health care professionals' understanding of and ability to establish linkages with these men. In order to recruit men into a research project and an educational program, staff at the Pitt Men's Study, an epidemiological investigation of HIV infection, developed a process described here as "brokering," which was based on community organizing and marketing principles. Brokering is a dynamic process by which researchers and public health professionals exchange goods and services with formal and informal leaders of the gay community in order to establish strong, long-term linkages. To date, this process yielded 2,989 homosexual and bisexual recruits into the study, which began in 1983. After 8 years, 79% of those still alive continue to return for follow-up. While recruitment techniques will need to vary from city to city, the importance of establishing linkages with the local indigenous leadership remains of major importance.
PubMed ID
8024944 View in PubMed
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146 records – page 1 of 15.