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Adolescents with cancer: experience of life and how it could be made easier.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature178966
Source
Cancer Nurs. 2004 Jul-Aug;27(4):325-35
Publication Type
Article
Author
Hannele Hokkanen
Elina Eriksson
Outi Ahonen
Sanna Salantera
Author Affiliation
Helsinki Polytechnic Stadia, Tukholmankatu 10, 00290 Helsinki, Finland. hannele.hokkanen@stadia.fi
Source
Cancer Nurs. 2004 Jul-Aug;27(4):325-35
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adaptation, Psychological
Adolescent
Adolescent Psychology
Attitude to Health
Decision Making
Female
Finland
Focus Groups
Goals
Health Knowledge, Attitudes, Practice
Helping Behavior
Humans
Life Change Events
Male
Morale
Needs Assessment
Negativism
Neoplasms - nursing - psychology
Nurse's Role
Nursing Methodology Research
Patient Education as Topic
Qualitative Research
Questionnaires
Self Concept
Social Support
Abstract
This study is about what adolescents with cancer think about their life situation, the support they get, and the information they receive about their illness. The data for this qualitative and descriptive study were collected in 3 focus group interviews with 20 adolescents aged 13 to 18 years attending a cancer adjustment camp. Interpretation was based on the method of inductive content analysis. The adolescents' experiences of their current situation were analyzed into 5 categories: views on life here and now, negative experiences of self because of the illness, resources recognized in self, difficulties caused by the illness in relation to life around them, and resources identified in the world around. They made very little, if any, conscious effort to plan ahead for the future. The information received by the adolescents concerned their illness and its treatment here and now, various practical matters, as well as the future impacts of the illness and its treatments. Most of this information focused on the here and now, whereas the adolescents' information needs were mainly oriented to the future. As for the adolescents' chances to take part in making decisions about their care and life, the analysis yielded 6 categories: joint decision making, inadequate chances for decision making, independent decision making, illusion of decision making, reluctant to make decisions, and excluded from decision making. Finally, the adolescents' hopes for improvement were focused on staff activities, physical care facilities, chances to discuss and work through their experiences of the illness, and the support received from society.
PubMed ID
15292729 View in PubMed
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[Affective touch and self esteem in the elderly].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature167192
Source
Rech Soins Infirm. 2006 Sep;(86):52-67
Publication Type
Article
Date
Sep-2006
Author
Andréa Boudreault
Antoine Lutumba Ntetu
Author Affiliation
Infirmière clinicienne au Carrefour de santé de Jonquière, Québec, Canada.
Source
Rech Soins Infirm. 2006 Sep;(86):52-67
Date
Sep-2006
Language
French
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Affect
Aged - psychology
Aged, 80 and over
Attitude of Health Personnel
Attitude to Health
Communication
Empathy
Female
Geriatric Nursing - organization & administration
Health Facility Environment - organization & administration
Hospital Units - organization & administration
Humans
Male
Negativism
Nurse's Role - psychology
Nurse-Patient Relations
Nursing Evaluation Research
Patient Care Team - organization & administration
Prejudice
Quebec
Self Concept
Shame
Touch
Abstract
The hospital is an environment which accomodates the elderly persons and in which these last have to make trainings at one time when they are not in full possession with all their physical, psychological and cognitive capacities. They can then live there humiliating situations which generate feelings of discomfort, embarrassment and shame. The presence of interveners not very warm, lacking compassion lack and impressed negative prejudices towards the elderly patients, is another factor which is added to lead them not to feel at ease, involving, inter alia, consequences a fall of their self-esteem. However the affective touch is a strategy which would have the potential to act on the personal value of the elderly patients and to thus improve their self-esteem. It is with a view to popularize the use of the affective touch in practice nurse that a study was carried out in order to check its effects on the self-esteem of the elderly patients. The results confirm that the emotional touch influences positively the self-esteem of the elderly patients. The authors of the study thus recommend the systematization of the affective touch in nursing practice.
PubMed ID
17020239 View in PubMed
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AIDS, Africa and indifference: a confession.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature188490
Source
CMAJ. 2002 Sep 3;167(5):485-7
Publication Type
Article
Date
Sep-3-2002
Author
Joel Pauls Wohigemut
Author Affiliation
jrpaulsw@uwo.ca
Source
CMAJ. 2002 Sep 3;167(5):485-7
Date
Sep-3-2002
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Acquired Immunodeficiency Syndrome - drug therapy - epidemiology - mortality
Africa South of the Sahara - epidemiology
Attitude of Health Personnel
Drug Industry
Humans
Negativism
Ontario
Patents as Topic
Philosophy, Medical
Notes
Cites: JAMA. 2001 Oct 17;286(15):1886-9211597292
Cites: CMAJ. 2001 Jun 26;164(13):1825, 182711450273
PubMed ID
12240816 View in PubMed
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Attitudes toward aging: implications for a caring profession.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature149477
Source
J Nurs Educ. 2009 Jul;48(7):374-80
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jul-2009
Author
Ann Holroyd
Sherry Dahlke
Cindy Fehr
Piera Jung
Andrea Hunter
Author Affiliation
Vancouver Island University, Vancouver, British Columbia, Canada.
Source
J Nurs Educ. 2009 Jul;48(7):374-80
Date
Jul-2009
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Aged
Analysis of Variance
Attitude of Health Personnel - ethnology
Canada
Chi-Square Distribution
Cross-Sectional Studies
Curriculum
Education, Nursing, Baccalaureate - organization & administration
Empathy
Female
Geriatric Nursing - education
Health Knowledge, Attitudes, Practice
Humans
Linear Models
Male
Middle Aged
Needs Assessment
Negativism
Nursing Education Research
Nursing Methodology Research
Prejudice
Questionnaires
Statistics, nonparametric
Students, Nursing - psychology
Abstract
With the predicted increase in the age of Canada's overall population, it is estimated that by 2020, up to 75% of nurses' time will be spent with older adults. It is recognized that care of older adults occurs in a cultural context in which the older members of society are poorly valued, often referred to as ageism. Based on the premise that attitudes affect behavior and knowledge acquisition, a comparative cross-sectional study using the Attitudes Toward Old People scale measured nursing students' attitudes at different points in a baccalaureate nursing program. Although analysis of variance revealed no significant differences in students' attitudes during the 4 years, post hoc analysis revealed a drop in positive attitudes and a rise in negative attitudes at the beginning of the second and fourth years of the baccalaureate program.
PubMed ID
19634262 View in PubMed
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Attitudes toward organ donation and transplantation. A model for understanding reactions to medical procedures after death.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature73193
Source
Soc Sci Med. 1994 Apr;38(8):1141-52
Publication Type
Article
Date
Apr-1994
Author
M. Sanner
Author Affiliation
Department of Social Medicine, Akademiska sjukhuset, Uppsala, Sweden.
Source
Soc Sci Med. 1994 Apr;38(8):1141-52
Date
Apr-1994
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Aged
Altruism
Anxiety - psychology
Attitude to Death
Defense Mechanisms
Female
Health Knowledge, Attitudes, Practice
Humans
Logic
Male
Middle Aged
Models, Psychological
Motivation
Negativism
Organ Transplantation - psychology
Philosophy
Religion and Medicine
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Sampling Studies
Social Alienation
Sweden
Tissue Donors - psychology
Tissue and Organ Procurement
Trust
Abstract
The main purpose of this study was to reach a deeper understanding of factors influencing the attitudes toward organ donation and other procedures with the dead body. From a survey of 400 inhabitants of Uppsala, a city in the middle of Sweden, concerning attitudes toward transplantation issues, 38 individuals with different attitudes toward donation of their own organs were selected for follow-up interviews. From the interviews, more than 600 statements concerning motives and reactions to medical procedures with the dead body were listed. These statements were summarized in 20 motive categories, in which 17 the nature of the motives were negative to organ donation and three promoting such a procedure. The categories were then analyzed and interpreted within a frame of reference of psychodynamic defense theory. In several cases it was possible to relate them to common death anxiety defenses. Six different motive complexes were extracted. These are called (1) illusion of lingering life; (2) protection of the value of the individual; (3) distrust, anxiety and alienation; (4) respecting the limits set by Nature or God; (5) altruism; and (6) rationality. Individuals not willing to donate their own organs were judged as either (a) reacting out of strenthened death anxiety defenses, or (b) as having a special outlook on life, where the idea of what is 'natural' was emphasized. The adverse reactions of the positive attitude group were seen as initial reactions perceived as derivations of common death anxiety defenses and weakened when confronted with altruistic and fact-stressing arguments. In the 'undecided group' of 14 persons, 11 arrived at a definite opinion. Seven decided for organ donation when their mistaken beliefs were corrected or when they took time to work through their initial uneasiness, while 4 persons actually were clearly negative. Three still remained uncertain. The stability of these attitudes seems to be high, often being experienced as a part of one's philosophy of life.
PubMed ID
8042059 View in PubMed
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Challenges of current geriatric education-inspired by the Nordic geriatric professors' meetings.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature174954
Source
Gerontol Geriatr Educ. 2003;24(1):1-14
Publication Type
Article
Date
2003
Author
Pálmi V Jónsson
Yngve Gustafson
Finn Rønholt Hansen
Kai Saks
Kaisu H Pitkala
Author Affiliation
University of Iceland, School of Medicine, Reykjavík, Iceland.
Source
Gerontol Geriatr Educ. 2003;24(1):1-14
Date
2003
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aged
Attitude of Health Personnel
Curriculum - standards - trends
Diffusion of Innovation
Education, Medical, Undergraduate - organization & administration
Educational Technology - organization & administration
Europe
Faculty, Medical
Geriatrics - education - organization & administration
Humans
Needs Assessment
Negativism
North America
Physician's Role
Prejudice
Scandinavia
Students, Medical - psychology
Teaching - organization & administration
Western World
Abstract
Geriatric educators are faced with several different challenges. The rapid growth of aged population in the Western world has led to a growing need for health and social services and thus, an increased need for trained professionals in this field. In addition, new learning theories and activating learning methods have achieved wide acceptance in academic medicine. How has geriatric education applied these new learning methods? In this article we review the current status of academic geriatric education in Western countries in these respects. We especially review the literature of how geriatric training has been experimenting with the new learning methods.
PubMed ID
15871939 View in PubMed
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Clinical phenotype of schizophrenia in a Finnish isolate.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature181364
Source
Schizophr Res. 2004 Apr 1;67(2-3):195-205
Publication Type
Article
Date
Apr-1-2004
Author
Ritva Arajärvi
Jari Haukka
Teppo Varilo
Jaana Suokas
Hannu Juvonen
Jaana Suvisaari
Maria Muhonen
Kirsi Suominen
Annamari Tuulio-Henriksson
Marjut Schreck
Iiris Hovatta
Timo Partonen
Jouko Lönnqvist
Author Affiliation
Department of Mental Health and Alcohol Research, National Public Health Institute, Mannerheimintie 166, Helsinki 00300, Finland. ritva.arajarvi@ktl.fi
Source
Schizophr Res. 2004 Apr 1;67(2-3):195-205
Date
Apr-1-2004
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Alleles
Delusions - etiology
Factor Analysis, Statistical
Family Health
Female
Finland - epidemiology
Gene Frequency
Genetic Predisposition to Disease
Hallucinations - etiology
Humans
Lod Score
Male
Mood Disorders - etiology
Negativism
Nuclear Family
Odds Ratio
Pedigree
Phenotype
Prevalence
Psychiatric Status Rating Scales
Psychotic Disorders - epidemiology - genetics
Registries - statistics & numerical data
Schizophrenia - complications - epidemiology - genetics
Schizophrenic Psychology
Abstract
We identified all cases in Finland (population of 5 million) with a diagnosis of schizophrenia born between 1940 and 1969, using four national computerised registers with high reliability. A sample of 397 families was identified in a genetically homogeneous internal isolate (population of 18,000) in northeastern Finland with high prevalence for schizophrenia and an LOD score of 3.8 in chromosome 1. Our aim was to examine with Operational Criteria Checklist for Psychotic Illness (OCCPI) factor analysis the psychotic and affective signs and symptoms of schizophrenia in this genetically homogeneous population, and compare them with findings from individuals with schizophrenia from multiplex families from the whole country. After collecting all original case notes, we made DSM-IV consensus diagnoses and completed OCCPI ratings on a lifetime basis. For the factor analysis, we accepted 190 patients with a diagnosis of schizophrenia. In addition, 466 schizophrenia patients from 147 multiplex families from the whole country were included in the analysis. The OCCPI factor analysis resulted in four factors: "delusions and hallucinations" and "negative" factors, plus two affective ("manic" and "depressive") factors. We compared the pattern of symptoms among three patient groups: isolate patients who were the only affected individuals in their family, isolate patients who had affected family members, and patients from the whole country with affected family members. We found no clear differences among these groups. However, there were significant differences in the frequency of individual OCCPI items between the study groups. Findings in this schizophrenia OCCPI phenotype study suggest that the clinical picture of schizophrenia in a genetically isolated and homogeneous population closely resembles our nationwide findings in Finland.
PubMed ID
14984878 View in PubMed
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Detrimental effects of falling on health and well-being in later life: the mediating roles of perceived control and optimism.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature165273
Source
J Health Psychol. 2007 Mar;12(2):231-48
Publication Type
Article
Date
Mar-2007
Author
Joelle C Ruthig
Judith G Chipperfield
Nancy E Newall
Raymond P Perry
Nathan C Hall
Author Affiliation
University of North Dakota, ND 58202, USA. joelle.ruthig@und.nodak.edu
Source
J Health Psychol. 2007 Mar;12(2):231-48
Date
Mar-2007
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Accidental Falls
Adaptation, Psychological
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Female
Humans
Internal-External Control
Longitudinal Studies
Male
Manitoba
Motor Activity
Negativism
Quality of Life - psychology
Self Efficacy
Sickness Impact Profile
United States
Abstract
Falling is common among older adults, often resulting in decreased functional ability and quality of life. To understand processes underlying the fall/health and well-being relationship, it is important to identify psychosocial mediators. The current study examined the impact of falling on subsequent physical health, negative emotions and physical activity among 231 young-old (
PubMed ID
17284488 View in PubMed
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Differences in beliefs between patients and pharmaceutical specialists regarding medications.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature172803
Source
Patient Educ Couns. 2006 Aug;62(2):244-9
Publication Type
Article
Date
Aug-2006
Author
Helena Ramström
Shanaz Afandi
Katarina Elofsson
Sune Petersson
Author Affiliation
Huddinge Hospital Pharmacy, Karolinska University Hospital Huddinge, SE-141 86 Stockholm, Sweden. helena.ramstrom@apoteket.se
Source
Patient Educ Couns. 2006 Aug;62(2):244-9
Date
Aug-2006
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Aged
Attitude of Health Personnel
Attitude to Health
Communication
Cooperative Behavior
Drug Therapy - psychology - standards
Drug-Related Side Effects and Adverse Reactions
Health Knowledge, Attitudes, Practice
Health services needs and demand
Humans
Middle Aged
Negativism
Patient-Centered Care
Patients - psychology
Pharmacists - psychology
Professional Role - psychology
Professional-Patient Relations
Questionnaires
Safety
Statistics, nonparametric
Sweden
Trust
Abstract
To investigate beliefs concerning medication among patients and pharmaceutical specialists (3 or 5 years of higher education).
The Beliefs about Medicines Questionnaire (BMQ)-General, which assesses beliefs about medicines in general, was used.
For the analyses, 141 (response rate 82%) and 136 (response rate 79%) questionnaires from the patients and pharmaceutical specialists, respectively, were included. The results showed a statistical significant difference between patients and pharmaceutical specialists in beliefs about medicines. Whereas the patients expressed a more negative attitude about medicines (stronger beliefs about medicines as being harmful and less favourable) the pharmaceutical specialists expressed the contrary. However, the pharmaceutical specialists had stronger concerns regarding over-use of medicines as compared to the patients.
Patients and pharmaceutical specialists expressed different views regarding medications. To achieve concordance in the pharmaceutical care process, pharmaceutical specialists need to exchange information about patients' experiences and not take for granted that they share their views regarding medications.
The pharmaceutical specialists should elicit the patient's concerns about the prescribed medications and be aware of that non-adherence is often the result of the patients making rational decisions about their treatment.
PubMed ID
16174561 View in PubMed
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Diversity and ambivalence in general practitioners' attitudes towards preventive health checks - a qualitative study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature123630
Source
BMC Fam Pract. 2012;13:53
Publication Type
Article
Date
2012
Author
Anne Søndergaard
Bo Christensen
Helle Terkildsen Maindal
Author Affiliation
Department of Public Health, Section for General Practice, Aarhus University, Aarhus, Denmark. annesoje@hotmail.com
Source
BMC Fam Pract. 2012;13:53
Date
2012
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Denmark
Female
Focus Groups
Health Knowledge, Attitudes, Practice
Health Promotion - methods - standards
Humans
Interviews as Topic
Male
Middle Aged
Negativism
Outcome and Process Assessment (Health Care)
Physical Examination
Physician-Patient Relations
Physicians, Family - psychology
Professional Practice Location
Qualitative Research
Questionnaires
Referral and Consultation
Abstract
Systematic preventive health checks in primary care have been introduced in several countries. The Danish Health Service does not provide this service, but health checks are nevertheless being conducted unsystematically. Very little is known about the GPs' experience with this service.The purpose of our study is to describe GPs' attitudes towards and concerns about providing preventive health checks and to describe their experiences with the health checks that they provide in daily practice.
A qualitative descriptive study was conducted based on three semi-structured focus group interviews with 16 GPs from Central Region, Denmark. The focus group interviews took place at the Department of Public Health, Section for General Practice, Aarhus University in November 2010.
We found that the participating GPs all conducted some kind of preventive health checks, but also that there was great diversity in the content. The GPs were somewhat ambivalent towards health checks. Many GPs found the service beneficial for the patients. Concurrently, they had reservations about promoting ill-health, they questioned whether the health checks were a core mission of primary care, and they were concerned whether the health checks would benefit the "right" patients. The GPs felt a need for further documentation of the benefits for the patients before a possible future implementation of systematic health checks. Some GPs found that health checks could be performed in other settings than general practice.
Our study revealed that health checks are performed differently. Their quality differs, and the GPs perform the health check based on their personal attitude towards this service and prevention in general. Our analysis suggests that the doctors are basically uncertain about the best approach. Our study also uncovers the GPs' reservations about inducing negative psychological reactions and decreased well-being among the health check participants. Further studies are needed to disclose where these concerns emerge.
Notes
Cites: Scand J Public Health. 2008 Aug;36(6):650-6118775821
Cites: Prev Med. 2009 Mar;48(3):242-619150366
Cites: Aust Fam Physician. 2009 May;38(5):358-6219458808
Cites: BMC Fam Pract. 2009;10:5919706198
Cites: Prev Med. 2009 Nov;49(5):424-819664653
Cites: BMJ. 2010;340:c169320418545
Cites: Scand J Public Health. 2007;35(4):365-7217786799
Cites: Ugeskr Laeger. 2011 Jun 6;173(23):167121793259
Cites: Res Nurs Health. 2000 Aug;23(4):334-4010940958
Cites: BMJ. 2002 Jul 13;325(7355):78-8012114238
Cites: Br J Gen Pract. 1993 Sep;43(374):375-78251234
Cites: BMJ. 1995 Jul 29;311(7000):299-3027633241
Cites: J Wound Ostomy Continence Nurs. 2005 Nov-Dec;32(6):413-2016301909
Cites: Eur J Gen Pract. 2010 Sep;16(3):139-4220825271
PubMed ID
22681707 View in PubMed
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61 records – page 1 of 7.