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Aboriginal nursing education in Canada: an update.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature157124
Source
Can Nurse. 2008 Apr;104(4):24-8
Publication Type
Article
Date
Apr-2008
Author
David Gregory
Em M Pijl-Zieber
Jeannette Barsky
Melissa Daniels
Author Affiliation
School of Health Sciences, University of Lethbridge, Alberta.
Source
Can Nurse. 2008 Apr;104(4):24-8
Date
Apr-2008
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Attitude to Health - ethnology
Canada
Career Choice
Cultural Diversity
Education, Nursing, Baccalaureate - organization & administration
Education, Nursing, Graduate - organization & administration
Faculty, Nursing - organization & administration
Health Planning Guidelines
Humans
Indians, North American - education - statistics & numerical data
Needs Assessment - organization & administration
Nursing Education Research
Nursing Staff - education - supply & distribution
Personnel Selection
Personnel Turnover - statistics & numerical data
Remedial Teaching - organization & administration
School Admission Criteria
Schools, Nursing - organization & administration
Societies, Nursing - organization & administration
Student Dropouts - education - psychology - statistics & numerical data
Students, Nursing - psychology - statistics & numerical data
Abstract
Canada does not have enough aboriginal nurses and aboriginal nursing faculty. Consequently, there is an inadequate number of nurses to meet both on- and off-reserve and community health care staffing needs. In 2002, Health Canada asked the Canadian Association of University Schools of Nursing to facilitate a national task force that would examine aboriginal nursing in Canada. The task force engaged in an extensive literature review, conducted a national survey of nursing programs, and explored recruitment and retention strategies. In 2007, the association prepared an update on the current status. In this article, the authors review the progress made during the intervening five years in the recruitment, retention and education of aboriginal nursing students.
PubMed ID
18488764 View in PubMed
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Access to health services by Canadians who are chronically ill.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature174970
Source
West J Nurs Res. 2005 Jun;27(4):465-86
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-2005
Author
Shannon M Spenceley
Author Affiliation
University of Alberta, Canada.
Source
West J Nurs Res. 2005 Jun;27(4):465-86
Date
Jun-2005
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Attitude to Health
Canada - epidemiology
Chronic Disease - epidemiology - psychology - therapy
Data Collection - standards
Data Interpretation, Statistical
Health Care Reform - organization & administration
Health Services Accessibility - organization & administration
Health Services Research - organization & administration
Humans
National health programs - organization & administration
Needs Assessment - organization & administration
Research Design - standards
Abstract
Access to health care services in Canada has been identified as an urgent priority, and chronic disease has been suggested as the most pressing health concern facing Canadians. Access to services for Canadians living with chronic disease, however, has received little emphasis in the research literature or in health policy reform documents. A systematic review of research into factors impeding or facilitating access to formal health services for people in Canada living with chronic illness is presented. The review includes 31 studies of Canadian populations published between 1990 and 2002; main results were analyzed for facilitators and barriers to access for people experiencing chronic disease. An underlying organizing construct of symmetry between consumers, providers, and the larger Canadian system is suggested as a relevant lens from which to view the findings. Finally, a discussion of the relationship between identified factors and the principles of primary health care is offered.
PubMed ID
15870244 View in PubMed
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Adolescents with anorexia nervosa: multiple perspectives of discharge readiness.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature173064
Source
J Child Adolesc Psychiatr Nurs. 2005 Jul-Sep;18(3):116-26
Publication Type
Article
Author
Sheri L Turrell
Ron Davis
Heather Graham
Iris Weiss
Author Affiliation
Eating Disorders Program, Hospital for Sick Children, Toronto, Ontario, Canada. sturrell@nygh.on.ca
Source
J Child Adolesc Psychiatr Nurs. 2005 Jul-Sep;18(3):116-26
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adolescent Behavior - psychology
Adolescent Psychology
Adult
Aftercare
Anorexia Nervosa - psychology - therapy
Attitude of Health Personnel
Attitude to Health
Community Mental Health Services
Convalescence - psychology
Female
Hospitals, Pediatric
Humans
Male
Needs Assessment - organization & administration
Nurse's Role
Nursing Methodology Research
Nursing Staff, Hospital - psychology
Ontario
Parents - psychology
Patient Discharge - standards
Patient Education as Topic
Pilot Projects
Psychiatric Nursing - organization & administration
Questionnaires
Abstract
Little is known about the conditions that must be in place to help adolescent patients and their families gain the confidence needed to continue recovery at home, following the adolescents' hospitalization for anorexia nervosa.
Beliefs about discharge readiness were obtained through an open-ended questionnaire following the patients' first weekend pass home from an in-patient unit. The perceptions of patients, parents, and registered nurses were obtained using parallel versions of a questionnaire.
An examination of the responses revealed four themes; medical stability, education, psychological changes, and community resource planning, that were common to all respondents, as well as themes specific to adolescents and to nurses.
The findings suggest that each group of respondents has unique discharge readiness needs and that registered nurses have an important role to play in helping patients and families make the transition home as successful as possible. Implications for nursing practice are highlighted.
PubMed ID
16137269 View in PubMed
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An assessment of the potential for repatriating care from urban to rural Manitoba.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature201458
Source
Med Care. 1999 Jun;37(6 Suppl):JS167-86
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-1999
Author
C. Black
C. Burchill
Author Affiliation
Manitoba Centre for Health Policy and Evaluation, Department of Community Health Sciences, Faculty of Medicine, University of Manitoba, Winnipeg, Canada.
Source
Med Care. 1999 Jun;37(6 Suppl):JS167-86
Date
Jun-1999
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Benchmarking
Community Health Planning
Feasibility Studies
Health Facility Closure
Health Policy
Health Services Accessibility
Hospital Planning - organization & administration
Hospitals, Rural - utilization
Hospitals, Urban - organization & administration
Humans
Manitoba
Needs Assessment - organization & administration
Sensitivity and specificity
Abstract
Following the closure of Manitoba hospital beds, the Manitoba government adopted a strategy of shifting hospital care from more expensive urban hospitals to less expensive rural facilities. With this project, Manitoba Centre for Health Policy and Evaluation (MCHPE) studied the implications of the stated policy of "repatriation."
The project first involved examining population-based patterns of hospital utilization to define hospital service areas for 10 large rural hospitals. Three different hospital service area definitions were developed for use in sensitivity testing. Rates of overall use of hospital services, indicators of need for health care, and patterns of use of urban facilities are compared for these hospital service areas. Using a large rural hospital as a benchmark, patterns of adult surgical, adult medical, pediatric, and obstetric care were examined for the hospital service areas. Number and percent of cases provided by the index hospital and by urban hospitals were compared, to assess the feasibility and the potential impact of redirection of care to the benchmark level.
Although in theory a significant percentage of care delivered to rural residents by Winnipeg hospitals might be redirected to rural institutions, the project raised issues of feasibility. Moreover, it identified that most of the redirected cases could be accommodated within existing capacity.
PubMed ID
10409008 View in PubMed
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An integrated dialysis delivery network in Ontario.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature202089
Source
J CANNT. 1999;9(1):20-3
Publication Type
Article
Date
1999
Author
K. Peters
H. Ryan
Author Affiliation
London Health Sciences Centre, Ontario.
Source
J CANNT. 1999;9(1):20-3
Date
1999
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Ambulatory Care - organization & administration
Community Health Services - organization & administration
Delivery of Health Care, Integrated - organization & administration
Humans
Kidney Failure, Chronic - therapy
Models, organizational
Needs Assessment - organization & administration
Ontario
Outcome Assessment (Health Care)
Program Development - methods
Program Evaluation
Regional Medical Programs - organization & administration
Renal Dialysis
Abstract
In August 1995, the Ontario Ministry of Health (MOH) issued a request for proposal (RFP) for the establishment of new and expanded dialysis services. London Health Sciences Centre (LHSC) was successful in expanding its integrated dialysis delivery network with satellites in Stratford, Woodstock and Owen Sound. This achievement required collaboration of LHSC and host hospital staff to meet the challenging RFP requirements. With final approval received in January 1997, efforts were required to establish an operational model supporting self-care and full-care patients, to train satellite staff and patients, and to manage the resulting clinical impact. A balanced scorecard (Kaplan & Norton, 1992) evaluation model was developed. Initial outcome data indicate that full-care patients in satellites require more fallback support to London units, experience more hypotensive episodes during dialysis and, in some cases, demonstrate lower levels of dialysis adequacy and nutritional status when compared to satellite self-care patients. Findings from these data will assist in revising patient inclusion criteria and processes to optimize community-based dialysis.
PubMed ID
10335160 View in PubMed
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An update on risk communication in the Arctic.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature289269
Source
Int J Circumpolar Health. 2016; 75:33822
Publication Type
Journal Article
Review
Date
2016
Author
Eva-Maria Krümmel
Andrew Gilman
Author Affiliation
Inuit Circumpolar Council, Ottawa, Canada; ekruemmel@scientissime.com.
Source
Int J Circumpolar Health. 2016; 75:33822
Date
2016
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Review
Keywords
Arctic Regions
Communicable Disease Control - organization & administration
Environmental Exposure - prevention & control
Environmental monitoring
Environmental Pollutants - analysis
Food Contamination
Health Communication
Humans
Inuits
Needs Assessment - organization & administration
Public Health
Abstract
Arctic residents can be exposed to a wide range of contaminants through consumption of traditional (country) foods (i.e. food from wild animals and plants that are hunted, caught or collected locally in the Arctic). Yet these foods provide excellent nutrition, promote social cohesion, meet some spiritual needs for connectedness to the land and water, reinforce cultural ties, are economically important and promote overall good health for many. The risk and benefit balance associated with the consumption of traditional Arctic foods is complicated to communicate and has been referred to as the "Arctic Dilemma". This article gives an update on health risk communication in the Arctic region. It briefly summarizes some research on risk communication methodologies as well as approaches to an evaluation of the outcomes of risk communication initiatives. It provides information on specific initiatives in several Arctic countries, and particularly those that were directed at Indigenous populations. This article also summarizes some international versus local risk communication activities and the complexity of developing and delivering messages designed for different audiences. Finally, the potential application of social media for risk communication and a summary of "best practices" based on published literature and a survey of Inuit in a few Arctic countries are described.
Several of the risk communication initiatives portrayed in this article indicate that there is only limited awareness of the outcome of risk communication messages. In some cases, risk communication efforts appear to have been successful, at least when effectiveness is measured in an indirect way, for example, by lower contaminant levels. However, due to missing effectiveness evaluation studies, uncertainty remains as to whether a specific risk communication method was successful and could be clearly linked to behavioural changes that resulted in decreased contaminant exposure.
Notes
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PubMed ID
27974140 View in PubMed
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207 records – page 1 of 21.