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[Delivery on the mother's or the infant's premises?]

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature59621
Source
Tidsskr Nor Laegeforen. 1992 Apr 30;112(11):1484-5
Publication Type
Article
Date
Apr-30-1992
Author
R. Lindemann
Author Affiliation
Barneavdelingen Familie- og Barnklinikken, Ullevål sykehus, Oslo.
Source
Tidsskr Nor Laegeforen. 1992 Apr 30;112(11):1484-5
Date
Apr-30-1992
Language
Norwegian
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Delivery, Obstetric - methods - psychology
English Abstract
Female
Home Childbirth
Humans
Infant Welfare
Infant, Newborn
Labor, Obstetric - psychology
Maternal Welfare
Natural Childbirth - psychology
Norway
Parental Leave
Pregnancy
Abstract
A delivery should take place on the infant's premises. The mother's wishes and needs should also be taken into consideration, however, as long as they do not involve hazard to the child. The mother should have the right to take leave of absence at least four weeks before term and approximately one year after delivery. ABC-principles (Alternative Birth Care) during pregnancy and labour could be applied by making a hospital delivery more like a home delivery.
PubMed ID
1631830 View in PubMed
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Negotiating control and meaning: home birth as a self-constructed choice in Finland.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature195259
Source
Soc Sci Med. 2001 Apr;52(7):1109-21
Publication Type
Article
Date
Apr-2001
Author
K. Viisainen
Author Affiliation
University of Helsinki, Department of Public Health, Helsinki, Finland. kirsi.viisainen@stakes.fi
Source
Soc Sci Med. 2001 Apr;52(7):1109-21
Date
Apr-2001
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Anecdotes as Topic
Choice Behavior
Female
Finland
Holistic Health
Home Childbirth - psychology - utilization
Humans
Interviews as Topic
Male
Motivation
Natural Childbirth - psychology - utilization
Nurse Midwives
Patient Participation - psychology
Pregnancy
Professional Autonomy
Abstract
Each society has its own consensual understanding of birth and its determinants: caregivers, location, participants and loci of decision-making, which in the Western world are based on biomedical knowledge. However, two competing cultural models of childbirth, the biomedical/technocratic model and natural/holistic model, mediate women's choices and preferences for the place and caregiver in childbirth. This article explores the way in which these cultural models of birth and the existing practical possibilities for choices shape women's and men's understanding of home birth. Based on interviews with 21 Finnish women and 12 Finnish men, the reasons for and experiences of planning and building toward a home birth are examined through an analysis of birth narratives. The analysis focuses especially on the women's definitions of what is 'natural' and their relationship with health services where biomedical practices and knowledge are the norm. The analysis shows that the notion of 'natural birth' holds various meanings in Finnish women's narratives namely self-determination, control, and trust in one's intuition. I seek to demonstrate that just as the biomedical management of childbirth exhibits distinct cross-cultural variation, so also does resistance to biomedical hegemony, as such resistance is strongly embedded in the local socio-cultural situation.
PubMed ID
11266053 View in PubMed
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Opting for natural birth: A survey of birth intentions among young Icelandic women.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature283520
Source
Sex Reprod Healthc. 2017 Mar;11:41-46
Publication Type
Article
Date
Mar-2017
Author
Emma Marie Swift
Helga Gottfredsdottir
Helga Zoega
Mechthild M Gross
Kathrin Stoll
Source
Sex Reprod Healthc. 2017 Mar;11:41-46
Date
Mar-2017
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Cross-Sectional Studies
Decision Making
Delivery, Obstetric - psychology
Fear
Female
Health Knowledge, Attitudes, Practice
Humans
Iceland
Intention
Natural Childbirth - psychology
Pregnancy
Students
Surveys and Questionnaires
Universities
Young Adult
Abstract
To describe and analyse factors associated with natural birth intentions in a sample of pre-pregnant Icelandic women.
An internationally validated tool was used to survey pre-pregnant women about their attitudes towards birth. The online survey was sent to all students at the University of Iceland in November 2014. Log binomial regression was used to calculate crude and adjusted relative risks (RRa), and corresponding 95% confidence intervals (CI), for intentions of natural birth (defined as vaginal birth without epidural analgesia) by high, moderate and low childbirth fear and by high, moderate and low confidence in birth knowledge. Models were adjusted for socio-demographic and psychological factors.
410 eligible women completed the cross-sectional survey. Women with low fear of birth were more likely to have natural birth intentions when compared to women with moderate (RRa?=?2.83; 95% CI; 1.48-5.41) and high (RRa?=?4.86; 95% CI; 1.37-17.27) fear. Women with high confidence in their birth knowledge were more likely to have natural birth intentions compared to women with moderate (RRa?=?2.81; 95% CI; 1.51-5.22) and low (RRa?=?3.42; 95% CI; 1.43-8.18) confidence in their birth knowledge.
Pre-pregnant women with low fear of birth and high confidence in their birth knowledge are more likely to have natural birth intentions. Addressing concerns about pain, safety, the perceived unpredictability of birth and worries about the physical impact of childbirth may strengthen natural birth intentions.
PubMed ID
28159127 View in PubMed
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Swedish caregivers' attitudes towards caesarean section on maternal request.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature90132
Source
Women Birth. 2009 Jun;22(2):57-63
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-2009
Author
Karlström Annika
Engström-Olofsson Regina
Nystedt Astrid
Thomas Jan
Hildingsson Ingegerd
Author Affiliation
Research & Development Centre, Sundsvall Hospital, Sundsvall SE-851 86, Sweden. annika.karlstrom@lvn.se
Source
Women Birth. 2009 Jun;22(2):57-63
Date
Jun-2009
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Attitude of Health Personnel
Cesarean Section - psychology
Female
Focus Groups
Humans
Male
Midwifery
Natural Childbirth - psychology
Obstetrics
Patient satisfaction
Pregnancy
Professional-Patient Relations
Sweden
Abstract
BACKGROUND: Caesarean section (CS) is not an option that women in Sweden can chose themselves, although the rise in CS rate has been attributed to women. This study describes obstetricians' and midwives' attitudes towards CS on maternal request. METHODS: A qualitative descriptive study, with content analysis of 5 focus group discussions where 16 midwives and 9 obstetricians participated. RESULTS: The overarching theme was identified as "Caesarean section on maternal request-a balance between resistance and respect". On the one hand, CS was viewed as a risky project; on the other hand, request for a CS was understood and respected when women had had a previous traumatic birth experience. Still, a CS was not really seen as a solution for childbirth related fear. Five categories were related to the theme. Overall, our findings indicate that caregivers blamed the women for the increase, they considered the management of CS on maternal request difficult, and they suggested preventive methods to reduce CS and means to strengthen their professional roles. KEY CONCLUSIONS AND IMPLICATION FOR PRACTICE: Both midwives and obstetricians considered the management of CS on maternal request difficult, and the result showed that they balanced between resistance and respect. The result also showed that the participants stressed the importance of professionals advocating natural birth with evidence-based knowledge and methods to prevent maternal requests. Ongoing discussions among health professionals on attitudes and practice would strengthen their professional roles and lead to a decrease in CS rates in Sweden.
PubMed ID
19195958 View in PubMed
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Testing the waters - A cross-sectional survey of views about waterbirth among Swedish health professionals.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature309535
Source
Women Birth. 2020 Mar; 33(2):186-192
Publication Type
Journal Article
Date
Mar-2020
Author
Hanna Ulfsdottir
Sissel Saltvedt
Susanne Georgsson
Author Affiliation
Department of Clinical Science and Education, Karolinska Institutet, Sophiahemmet University, Department of Health Promoting Science, Lindstedtsvägen 8, Box 5605, SE-114 86 Stockholm, Sweden. Electronic address: Hanna.Ulfsdottir@shh.se.
Source
Women Birth. 2020 Mar; 33(2):186-192
Date
Mar-2020
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Keywords
Adult
Aged
Cross-Sectional Studies
Female
Health Personnel - statistics & numerical data
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Midwifery - statistics & numerical data
Natural Childbirth - psychology
Pregnancy
Surveys and Questionnaires
Sweden
Abstract
For women with low risk births, waterbirth is an alternative that is requested and provided in approximately a hundred countries. However, in some countries, including Sweden, waterbirth is not generally available.
To explore the experiences, knowledge and attitudes regarding waterbirth among midwives, obstetricians/gynaecologists and neonatologists.
A cross-sectional study was conducted in Sweden, using a web-based survey distributed via The Swedish Association of Midwives and the Heads of department of all Swedish maternity wards between April and June 2016. The respondents (n?=?1609) answered a combination of Likert-scale and open-ended questions. The responses were analysed with descriptive statistics and quantitative content analyses.
Both midwives and physicians stated a lack of experience, knowledge and clinical guidelines related to attending and assisting waterbirths. Overall, midwives had more positive attitudes to waterbirth (38.8% vs 4.5%) as well as towards providing and implementing waterbirth, compared to physicians (71.0% vs 14.9%). Midwives stated significantly more benefits and fewer risks for women and babies, compared to physicians who requested more evidence.
Opinions regarding waterbirth are to some extent based on attitudes rather than actual experience and knowledge. There are diverse interpretations of the strength of evidence and a lack of updating in the research field of waterbirth. As waterbirth is requested by women, health professionals need to update their knowledge in this topic in order to give coherent and evidence-based information and care to prospective parents.
PubMed ID
31054879 View in PubMed
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Waterbirth in low-risk pregnancy: An exploration of women's experiences.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature306827
Source
J Adv Nurs. 2020 May; 76(5):1221-1231
Publication Type
Journal Article
Date
May-2020
Author
Tommy Carlsson
Hanna Ulfsdottir
Author Affiliation
Sophiahemmet University College, Stockholm, Sweden.
Source
J Adv Nurs. 2020 May; 76(5):1221-1231
Date
May-2020
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Keywords
Adult
Female
Humans
Mothers - psychology - statistics & numerical data
Natural Childbirth - psychology - statistics & numerical data
Patient Satisfaction - statistics & numerical data
Pregnancy
Pregnant Women - psychology
Qualitative Research
Retrospective Studies
Surveys and Questionnaires
Sweden
Abstract
To explore retrospective descriptions about benefits, negative experiences and preparatory information related to waterbirths.
A qualitative study.
Women who gave birth in water with healthy pregnancies and low-risk births were consecutively recruited between December 2015-October 2018 from two birthing units in Sweden. All who gave birth in water during the recruitment period were included (N = 155) and 111 responded to the survey. Women were emailed a web-based survey six weeks postpartum. Open-ended questions were analysed with qualitative content analysis.
Two themes were identified related to benefits: (a) physical benefits: the water eases labour progression while offering buoyancy and pain relief; and (b) psychological benefits: improved relaxation and control in a demedicalized and safe setting. Two themes were identified related to negative experiences: (a) equipment-related issues due to the construction of the tub and issues related to being immersed in water; and (b) fears and worries related to waterbirth. In regard to preparatory information, respondents reported a lack of general and specific information related to waterbirths, even after they contacted birthing units to ask questions. Supplemental web-based information was sought, but the trustworthiness of these sources was questioned and a need for trustworthy web-based information was articulated.
Women who give birth in water experience physical and psychological benefits, but need better equipment and sufficient information. There is room for improvement with regard to prenatal and intrapartum care of women who give birth in water.
Judging from women's recounts, midwives and nurses should continue advocating waterbirth in low-risk pregnancies. The lack of adequate equipment in Swedish birthing units articulated by women challenge current routines and resources. The findings illustrate unfulfilled needs for preparatory information about waterbirth, further strengthening that midwives should discuss the possibility of waterbirth when meeting expectant parents in the antenatal setting.
??: ??????????????????????????????? ??: ????? ??: 2015?12??2018?10???,????????????????????????????????????????????????????????????(N=155),???111?????????????????????????????????????????????????? ??: ??????,??????????:(a)????:???????????????????????;??(b)????:?????????????????????????????????,??????????:(a)?????????????????????????????;??(b)????????????????????,?????,???????????????,???????????????????????????????????,??????????????,???????????????? ??: ?????????????????,????????????????????????????????????????????? ??: ????????,????????????????????????????,?????????????,????????????????????????,?????????????????????,??????????????????????????????????.
PubMed ID
32090362 View in PubMed
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What characterizes women who want to give birth as naturally as possible without painkillers or intervention?

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature138931
Source
Sex Reprod Healthc. 2010 Feb;1(1):21-6
Publication Type
Article
Date
Feb-2010
Author
Tone Kringeland
Anne Kjersti Daltveit
Anders Møller
Author Affiliation
Stord/Haugesund University College, Haugesund, Norway; The Nordic School of Public Health, Gothenburg, Sweden. tone.kringeland@hsh.no
Source
Sex Reprod Healthc. 2010 Feb;1(1):21-6
Date
Feb-2010
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Attitude
Fear
Female
Humans
Natural Childbirth - psychology
Norway
Personal Satisfaction
Pregnancy
Questionnaires
Self Efficacy
Abstract
To describe the characteristics of pregnant women who wish to have as natural a birth as possible without analgesics and without intervention.
National cohort study.
Norwegian Institute of Public Health.
55,859 pregnant women booked for antenatal care in Norway 1999-2007.
Data on women's interest in natural birth and a set of possible predictors were retrieved from a questionnaire completed at the 30th week of pregnancy and linked to the Medical Birth Registry of Norway.
Natural birth and the characteristics of pregnant women with such preferences.
Interest in natural childbirth was consistently expressed by 72%. Positive experience from previous pregnancies, first birth or third or later birth, no fear of giving birth, and reporting positive intra-psychic phenomena are significantly associated with the wish for natural birth.
Positive experiences from previous childbirths and no fear of giving birth are the strongest factors associated with a wish for as natural birth as possible and should be taken into consideration in public health.
PubMed ID
21122592 View in PubMed
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9 records – page 1 of 1.