Skip header and navigation

Refine By

692 records – page 1 of 70.

Source
Northwest Public Health. 2010:S2
Publication Type
Article
Date
Spr-Sum-2010
  1 website  
Author
Hurlburt, WB
Author Affiliation
State of Alaska Division of Public Health
Source
Northwest Public Health. 2010:S2
Date
Spr-Sum-2010
Language
English
Geographic Location
U.S.
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Alaska Natives
Indian Health Service
Public health nurses
Sanitarium
Tuberculosis
Abstract
In the mid-20th century, Alaska Native people experienced the highest incidence of tuberculosis of any population group, ever. The crude mortality rate from tuberculosis in the Kotzebue area in the mid-1950s was three times the crude mortality rate from all causes today.
Online Resources
Less detail

Abandoned Mid-Canada Radar Line sites in the Western James region of Northern Ontario, Canada: a source of organochlorines for First Nations people?

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature80754
Source
Sci Total Environ. 2006 Nov 1;370(2-3):452-66
Publication Type
Article
Date
Nov-1-2006
Author
Tsuji Leonard J S
Wainman Bruce C
Martin Ian D
Weber Jean-Philippe
Sutherland Celine
Nieboer Evert
Author Affiliation
Department of Environment and Resource Studies, University of Waterloo, Waterloo, Ontario, Canada N2L 3G1. ljtsuji@2fes.uwaterloo.ca
Source
Sci Total Environ. 2006 Nov 1;370(2-3):452-66
Date
Nov-1-2006
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
American Native Continental Ancestry Group
Animals
Birds
Diet
Environmental pollutants - blood
Female
Fishes
Food Contamination
Hazardous Waste
Humans
Hydrocarbons, Chlorinated - blood
Male
Mammals
Ontario
Abstract
The potential exists for human exposure to polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) and other contaminants originating from abandoned Mid-Canada Radar Line (MCRL) sites in sub-arctic Canada. We examined patterns of differences with respect to body burden of organochlorines (lipid-adjusted) between residents of the Ontario First Nations of Fort Albany (the site of MCRL Site 050) and Kashechewan (no radar base) and Hamilton (an industrial, southern Ontario community) to assess whether the presence of Site 050 influenced organochlorine body burden with respect to the people of Fort Albany. PCBs (Aroclor 1260 and summation operator14 PCBs congeners [CBs]) and DDE in the plasma of Fort Albany and Kashechewan subjects were elevated relative to Hamilton participants. PCB and DDE-plasma levels in First Nation women were of comparable magnitude to those reported for Inuit women living in the west/central Northwest Territories. Significantly lower DDE/DDT ratios observed for Fort Albany indicates exposure to higher levels of DDT compared to Kashechewan. The probable source of DDT exposure for Fort Albany people is the DDT-contaminated soil surrounding buildings of Site 050. The results of the correspondence analysis (CA) indicated that people from Hamilton had relatively higher pesticides and lower CB body burdens, while people from Fort Albany and Kashechewan exhibited relatively higher CBs and lower pesticide levels (CA-1). The separation of Fort Albany and Kashechewan from Hamilton was also clear using questionnaire data (i.e., plotting dietary principal component [PC]-1 scores against PC-2); PC-1 was correlated with the consumption of a traditional diet. Separation of Kashechewan and Albany residents occurred because the people of Kashechewan ate more traditional meats and consumed shorebirds. Only one significant relationship was found between PC analysis and contaminant loadings; PC-1 versus CA-3 for Kashechewan. The presence of Site 050 on Anderson Island appears to have influenced organochlorine body burden of the people of Fort Albany. ANCOVA results revealed that it was not activity on Anderson Island that was important, but activity on Site 050 was the influential variable. When these results are considered with the DDE/DDT ratio data and the CB 187 results (Fort Albany and Kashechewan residents differed significantly), the findings are suggestive that Site 050 did influence organochlorine body burden of people from Fort Albany.
PubMed ID
16959301 View in PubMed
Less detail

Aboriginal grandmothers' experience with health promotion and participatory action research.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature198754
Source
Qual Health Res. 2000 Mar;10(2):188-213
Publication Type
Article
Date
Mar-2000
Author
G. Dickson
Author Affiliation
College of Nursing, University of Saskatchewan, Canada.
Source
Qual Health Res. 2000 Mar;10(2):188-213
Date
Mar-2000
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aged
American Native Continental Ancestry Group
Female
Health Knowledge, Attitudes, Practice
Health promotion
Health Services Research
Humans
Middle Aged
Saskatchewan
Abstract
This article describes a case study examining the effects of participating in a health promotion project, one aspect of which was a health assessment conducted using participatory action research. The study was carried out over 2.5 years in a project for older Aboriginal women (hereafter known as the grandmothers). Participation in the project and health assessment contributed to a number of changes in them, which were categorized as cleansing and healing, connecting with self, acquiring knowledge and skills, connecting within the group, and external exposure and engagement. This experience demonstrated an approach to health promotion programming and conducting a health assessment that was acceptable to this group of people and fostered changes congruent with empowerment.
PubMed ID
10788283 View in PubMed
Less detail

Aboriginal healing: regaining balance and culture.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature171195
Source
J Transcult Nurs. 2006 Jan;17(1):13-22
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jan-2006
Author
Linda M Hunter
Jo Logan
Jean-Guy Goulet
Sylvia Barton
Author Affiliation
The Conference Board of Canada.
Source
J Transcult Nurs. 2006 Jan;17(1):13-22
Date
Jan-2006
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Aged
American Native Continental Ancestry Group
Canada
Female
Health Services, Indigenous
Holistic Nursing
Humans
Interviews as Topic
Male
Medicine, Traditional
Middle Aged
Spiritual Therapies
Urban Population
Abstract
This ethnographic study explored the question, How do urban-based First Nations peoples use healing traditions to address their health issues? The objectives were to examine how Aboriginal traditions addressed health issues and explore the link between such traditions and holism in nursing practice. Data collection consisted of individual interviews, participant observations, and field notes. Three major categories that emerged from the data analysis were: following a cultural path, gaining balance, and sharing in the circle of life. The global theme of healing holistically included following a cultural path by regaining culture through the use of healing traditions; gaining balance in the four realms of spiritual, emotional, mental, and physical health; and sharing in the circle of life by cultural interactions between Aboriginal peoples and non-Aboriginal health professionals. Implications for practice include incorporating the concepts of balance, holism, and cultural healing into the health care services for diverse Aboriginal peoples.
PubMed ID
16410432 View in PubMed
Less detail

Aboriginal health, identity and resources

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature2814
Source
Winnipeg: Dept. of Native Studies, University of Manitoba
Publication Type
Book/Book Chapter
Date
2000
Author
Oakes, Jill E.
Source
Winnipeg: Dept. of Native Studies, University of Manitoba
Date
2000
Geographic Location
Canada
Publication Type
Book/Book Chapter
Physical Holding
University of Alaska Anchorage
Keywords
Native peoples-- Canada, Northern
Less detail
Source
Aust N Z J Public Health. 1996 Aug;20(4):441
Publication Type
Article
Date
Aug-1996
Author
J F Thompson
Source
Aust N Z J Public Health. 1996 Aug;20(4):441
Date
Aug-1996
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
American Native Continental Ancestry Group
Health Personnel
Health promotion
Humans
Northwest Territories
Notes
Comment On: Aust N Z J Public Health. 1996 Jun;20(3):227-98768407
PubMed ID
8908775 View in PubMed
Less detail

Aboriginal spirituality: symbolic healing in Canadian prisons.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature220386
Source
Cult Med Psychiatry. 1993 Sep;17(3):345-62
Publication Type
Article
Date
Sep-1993
Author
J B Waldram
Author Affiliation
Department of Native Studies, University of Saskatchewan, Saskatoon, Canada.
Source
Cult Med Psychiatry. 1993 Sep;17(3):345-62
Date
Sep-1993
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
American Native Continental Ancestry Group - psychology
Canada
Cross-Cultural Comparison
Culture
Female
Humans
Male
Mental Healing - psychology
Mental health
Prisoners - psychology
Religion and Psychology
Abstract
Symbolic healing is a complex phenomenon that is still relatively poorly understood. This paper documents a process of symbolic healing which is occurring in Canadian penitentiaries, and which involves Aboriginal offenders in cultural awareness and educational programs. The situation is compounded, however, by the existence of offenders from diverse Aboriginal cultural backgrounds with differing degrees of orientation to Aboriginal and Euro-Canadian cultures. Participants must first receive the necessary education to allow them to identify with the healing symbols so that healing may ensue, and both the healers and the patients must engage in a process of redefining their cultures in search of a common cultural base.
PubMed ID
8269714 View in PubMed
Less detail

Aboriginal suicide in British Columbia.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature210445
Source
Percept Mot Skills. 1996 Dec;83(3 Pt 2):1202
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-1996
Author
D. Lester
Author Affiliation
Psychology Program, Richard Stockton College of New Jersey, Pomona 08240-0195, USA.
Source
Percept Mot Skills. 1996 Dec;83(3 Pt 2):1202
Date
Dec-1996
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Acculturation
American Native Continental Ancestry Group - psychology - statistics & numerical data
British Columbia - epidemiology
Cross-Sectional Studies
Humans
Incidence
Risk factors
Suicide - psychology - statistics & numerical data
PubMed ID
9017732 View in PubMed
Less detail

Absence of association between genetic variation of the beta 3-adrenergic receptor and metabolic phenotypes in Oji-Cree.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature205667
Source
Diabetes Care. 1998 May;21(5):851-4
Publication Type
Article
Date
May-1998
Author
R A Hegele
S B Harris
A J Hanley
H. Azouz
P W Connelly
B. Zinman
Author Affiliation
Blackburn Cardiovascular Genetics Laboratory, Robarts Research Institute, London, Ontario, Canada. robert.hegele@rri.on.ca
Source
Diabetes Care. 1998 May;21(5):851-4
Date
May-1998
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adipose Tissue - metabolism
Adult
Alleles
American Native Continental Ancestry Group - genetics
Analysis of Variance
Blood Glucose - metabolism
Body constitution
Body mass index
Diabetes Mellitus, Type 2 - blood - epidemiology - genetics
Female
Gene Frequency
Genetic Variation
Genotype
Humans
Insulin - blood
Male
Middle Aged
Ontario - epidemiology
Phenotype
Receptors, Adrenergic, beta - genetics
Abstract
To assess the association between the common missense variant, Y64R, in the gene encoding the beta 3-adrenergic receptor, ADRB3, and intermediate phenotypes related to obesity and NIDDM in Canadian Oji-Cree.
We determined genotypes of the ADRB3 Y64R polymorphism in 508 clinically and biochemically well-characterized adult Oji-Cree, of whom 115 had NIDDM. We tested for associations with multivariate analysis of variance.
We found the ADRB3 R64 allele frequency to be 0.40 in this population, which is the highest yet observed in a human population. Furthermore, 15% of subjects were R64/R64 homozygotes, compared with a virtual absence of homozygotes in European study samples. However, we found no statistically significant associations of the ADRB3 Y64R genotype either with the presence of NIDDM, with indexes of obesity, or with intermediate quantitative biochemical traits related to NIDDM.
Despite the very high frequency of the ADRB3 R64 allele in this sample of aboriginal people, it was not associated with any metabolic phenotype. This suggests that the ADRB3 R64 allele is probably not a major determinant of obesity or NIDDM in these aboriginal Canadians.
PubMed ID
9589254 View in PubMed
Less detail

The abstract for future health goals of the Alaska Native health.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature297112
Source
Section D Chapter I in Health of Alaskan Natives by Arctic Health Research Center. 7 p.
Publication Type
Book/Book Chapter
Date
1972
  1 document  
Author
Alaska Federation of Natives.
Source
Section D Chapter I in Health of Alaskan Natives by Arctic Health Research Center. 7 p.
Date
1972
Language
English
Geographic Location
U.S.
Publication Type
Book/Book Chapter
File Size
270637
Keywords
Alaska
Natives
Health
Medical care
Health corporations
Notes
Alternate chapter title: Health Goals of Native Alaskans.
Documents
Less detail

692 records – page 1 of 70.