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915 records – page 1 of 92.

A 50-Year Commitment to American Indian and Alaska Native Women.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature304709
Source
Obstet Gynecol. 2020 10; 136(4):739-744
Publication Type
Journal Article
Date
10-2020
Author
Alan G Waxman
William H J Haffner
Jean Howe
Kathleen Wilder
Tony Ogburn
Neil Murphy
Eve Espey
J Martin Tucker
Amanda Bruegl
Elaine Locke
Yvonne Malloy
Author Affiliation
University of New Mexico, Albuquerque, New Mexico; the Uniformed Services University of the Health Sciences, Bethesda, Maryland; the Northern Navajo Medical Center, Shiprock, New Mexico; the Mid-Columbia Medical Center, The Dalles, Oregon; the University of Texas Rio Grande Valley, Edinburg, Texas; the Alaska Native Medical Center, Anchorage, Alaska; the University of Mississippi Medical Center, Jackson, Mississippi; the Oregon Health and Science University, Portland, Oregon; and the American College of Obstetricians and Gynecologists, Washington, DC.
Source
Obstet Gynecol. 2020 10; 136(4):739-744
Date
10-2020
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Keywords
Alaskan Natives
Female
Gynecology
Health Services Accessibility - organization & administration - standards - trends
Healthcare Disparities - ethnology
Humans
Indians, North American
Intersectoral Collaboration
Obstetrics
Program Evaluation
Quality Improvement - organization & administration
Rural Health Services - standards
Surveys and Questionnaires
United States - epidemiology
Urban Health Services - standards
Vulnerable Populations - ethnology
Women's Health Services - organization & administration - standards - trends
Abstract
Since 1970, the American College of Obstetricians and Gynecologists' Committee on American Indian and Alaska Native Women's Health has partnered with the Indian Health Service and health care facilities serving Native American women to improve quality of care in both rural and urban settings. Needs assessments have included formal surveys, expert panels, consensus conferences, and onsite program reviews. Improved care has been achieved through continuing professional education, recruitment of volunteer obstetrician-gynecologists, advocacy, and close collaboration at the local and national levels. The inclusive and multifaceted approach of this program should provide an effective model for collaborations between specialty societies and health care professionals providing primary care services that can reduce health disparities in underserved populations.
PubMed ID
32925622 View in PubMed
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A 50-Year Commitment to American Indian and Alaska Native Women.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature311512
Source
Obstet Gynecol. 2021 01 01; 137(1):179
Publication Type
Journal Article
Comment
Date
01-01-2021
Author
Jay Naliboff
Author Affiliation
Mount Vernon, Maine.
Source
Obstet Gynecol. 2021 01 01; 137(1):179
Date
01-01-2021
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Comment
Keywords
Alaskan Natives
American Natives
Female
Humans
Indians, North American
Notes
CommentOn: Obstet Gynecol. 2020 Oct;136(4):739-744 PMID 32925622
PubMed ID
33399418 View in PubMed
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Source
Northwest Public Health. 2010:S2
Publication Type
Article
Date
Spr-Sum-2010
tuberculin skin testing. Alaska chose to retain the tuberculin skin testing as a population screening tool. The strategy in Alaska involved mass chest X-ray screening of Alaska Native village residents. State Public Health Nurses (PHN), who were partly funded by the Indian Health Service, conducted
  1 document  
Author
Hurlburt, WB
Author Affiliation
State of Alaska Division of Public Health
Source
Northwest Public Health. 2010:S2
Date
Spr-Sum-2010
Language
English
Geographic Location
U.S.
Publication Type
Article
File Size
284563
Keywords
Alaska Natives
Indian Health Service
Public health nurses
Sanitarium
Tuberculosis
Abstract
In the mid-20th century, Alaska Native people experienced the highest incidence of tuberculosis of any population group, ever. The crude mortality rate from tuberculosis in the Kotzebue area in the mid-1950s was three times the crude mortality rate from all causes today.
Documents

NPH_April_2010_Alaska.pdf

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Source
Alaska Native Health Board. 13 p.
Publication Type
Report
Date
2005
Alaska Native Health Board 2005 FEDERAL LEGISLATIVE PRIORITIES Alaska residents face some of the most extreme barriers to obtaining health care services in America, the greatest of these barriers being isolation. The goal. . .is to improve access to
  1 document  
Source
Alaska Native Health Board. 13 p.
Date
2005
Language
English
Geographic Location
U.S.
Publication Type
Report
File Size
297785
Keywords
Alaska Natives
Health care
U.S. Government
Documents

ANHB_Legislative-Priorities-Federal-FY-2005.pdf

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2013 BRFSS Adverse Childhood Experiences among Alaska Native People: executive summary.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature301061
Source
Alaska Epidemiology Center, Alaska Native Tribal Health Consortium. 7 pages.
Publication Type
Report
Date
[2013]
Executive Summary 2013 BRFSS Adverse Childhood Experiences among Alaska Native People An adverse childhood event (ACE) describes a traumatic experience in a person’s life occurring before the age of 18 that the person recalls as an adult.1 The original Adverse Childhood Events (ACEs) study
  1 document  
Source
Alaska Epidemiology Center, Alaska Native Tribal Health Consortium. 7 pages.
Date
[2013]
Language
English
Geographic Location
U.S.
Publication Type
Report
File Size
290855
Keywords
Alaska
Alaska Natives
Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System (BRFSS)
Adverse childhood event (ACE)
Documents

2013-ACES-Summary_FINAL-10-16-2014.pdf

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Abandoned Mid-Canada Radar Line sites in the Western James region of Northern Ontario, Canada: a source of organochlorines for First Nations people?

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature80754
Source
Sci Total Environ. 2006 Nov 1;370(2-3):452-66
Publication Type
Article
Date
Nov-1-2006
Author
Tsuji Leonard J S
Wainman Bruce C
Martin Ian D
Weber Jean-Philippe
Sutherland Celine
Nieboer Evert
Author Affiliation
Department of Environment and Resource Studies, University of Waterloo, Waterloo, Ontario, Canada N2L 3G1. ljtsuji@2fes.uwaterloo.ca
Source
Sci Total Environ. 2006 Nov 1;370(2-3):452-66
Date
Nov-1-2006
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
American Native Continental Ancestry Group
Animals
Birds
Diet
Environmental pollutants - blood
Female
Fishes
Food Contamination
Hazardous Waste
Humans
Hydrocarbons, Chlorinated - blood
Male
Mammals
Ontario
Abstract
The potential exists for human exposure to polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) and other contaminants originating from abandoned Mid-Canada Radar Line (MCRL) sites in sub-arctic Canada. We examined patterns of differences with respect to body burden of organochlorines (lipid-adjusted) between residents of the Ontario First Nations of Fort Albany (the site of MCRL Site 050) and Kashechewan (no radar base) and Hamilton (an industrial, southern Ontario community) to assess whether the presence of Site 050 influenced organochlorine body burden with respect to the people of Fort Albany. PCBs (Aroclor 1260 and summation operator14 PCBs congeners [CBs]) and DDE in the plasma of Fort Albany and Kashechewan subjects were elevated relative to Hamilton participants. PCB and DDE-plasma levels in First Nation women were of comparable magnitude to those reported for Inuit women living in the west/central Northwest Territories. Significantly lower DDE/DDT ratios observed for Fort Albany indicates exposure to higher levels of DDT compared to Kashechewan. The probable source of DDT exposure for Fort Albany people is the DDT-contaminated soil surrounding buildings of Site 050. The results of the correspondence analysis (CA) indicated that people from Hamilton had relatively higher pesticides and lower CB body burdens, while people from Fort Albany and Kashechewan exhibited relatively higher CBs and lower pesticide levels (CA-1). The separation of Fort Albany and Kashechewan from Hamilton was also clear using questionnaire data (i.e., plotting dietary principal component [PC]-1 scores against PC-2); PC-1 was correlated with the consumption of a traditional diet. Separation of Kashechewan and Albany residents occurred because the people of Kashechewan ate more traditional meats and consumed shorebirds. Only one significant relationship was found between PC analysis and contaminant loadings; PC-1 versus CA-3 for Kashechewan. The presence of Site 050 on Anderson Island appears to have influenced organochlorine body burden of the people of Fort Albany. ANCOVA results revealed that it was not activity on Anderson Island that was important, but activity on Site 050 was the influential variable. When these results are considered with the DDE/DDT ratio data and the CB 187 results (Fort Albany and Kashechewan residents differed significantly), the findings are suggestive that Site 050 did influence organochlorine body burden of people from Fort Albany.
PubMed ID
16959301 View in PubMed
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Aboriginal grandmothers' experience with health promotion and participatory action research.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature198754
Source
Qual Health Res. 2000 Mar;10(2):188-213
Publication Type
Article
Date
Mar-2000
Author
G. Dickson
Author Affiliation
College of Nursing, University of Saskatchewan, Canada.
Source
Qual Health Res. 2000 Mar;10(2):188-213
Date
Mar-2000
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aged
American Native Continental Ancestry Group
Female
Health Knowledge, Attitudes, Practice
Health promotion
Health Services Research
Humans
Middle Aged
Saskatchewan
Abstract
This article describes a case study examining the effects of participating in a health promotion project, one aspect of which was a health assessment conducted using participatory action research. The study was carried out over 2.5 years in a project for older Aboriginal women (hereafter known as the grandmothers). Participation in the project and health assessment contributed to a number of changes in them, which were categorized as cleansing and healing, connecting with self, acquiring knowledge and skills, connecting within the group, and external exposure and engagement. This experience demonstrated an approach to health promotion programming and conducting a health assessment that was acceptable to this group of people and fostered changes congruent with empowerment.
PubMed ID
10788283 View in PubMed
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Aboriginal healing: regaining balance and culture.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature171195
Source
J Transcult Nurs. 2006 Jan;17(1):13-22
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jan-2006
Author
Linda M Hunter
Jo Logan
Jean-Guy Goulet
Sylvia Barton
Author Affiliation
The Conference Board of Canada.
Source
J Transcult Nurs. 2006 Jan;17(1):13-22
Date
Jan-2006
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Aged
American Native Continental Ancestry Group
Canada
Female
Health Services, Indigenous
Holistic Nursing
Humans
Interviews as Topic
Male
Medicine, Traditional
Middle Aged
Spiritual Therapies
Urban Population
Abstract
This ethnographic study explored the question, How do urban-based First Nations peoples use healing traditions to address their health issues? The objectives were to examine how Aboriginal traditions addressed health issues and explore the link between such traditions and holism in nursing practice. Data collection consisted of individual interviews, participant observations, and field notes. Three major categories that emerged from the data analysis were: following a cultural path, gaining balance, and sharing in the circle of life. The global theme of healing holistically included following a cultural path by regaining culture through the use of healing traditions; gaining balance in the four realms of spiritual, emotional, mental, and physical health; and sharing in the circle of life by cultural interactions between Aboriginal peoples and non-Aboriginal health professionals. Implications for practice include incorporating the concepts of balance, holism, and cultural healing into the health care services for diverse Aboriginal peoples.
PubMed ID
16410432 View in PubMed
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Aboriginal health, identity and resources

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature2814
Source
Winnipeg: Dept. of Native Studies, University of Manitoba
Publication Type
Book/Book Chapter
Date
2000
Author
Oakes, Jill E.
Source
Winnipeg: Dept. of Native Studies, University of Manitoba
Date
2000
Geographic Location
Canada
Publication Type
Book/Book Chapter
Physical Holding
University of Alaska Anchorage
Keywords
Native peoples-- Canada, Northern
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Source
Aust N Z J Public Health. 1996 Aug;20(4):441
Publication Type
Article
Date
Aug-1996
Author
J F Thompson
Source
Aust N Z J Public Health. 1996 Aug;20(4):441
Date
Aug-1996
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
American Native Continental Ancestry Group
Health Personnel
Health promotion
Humans
Northwest Territories
Notes
Comment On: Aust N Z J Public Health. 1996 Jun;20(3):227-98768407
PubMed ID
8908775 View in PubMed
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915 records – page 1 of 92.