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Accessibility and the Canadian health care system: squaring perceptions and realities.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature182001
Source
Health Policy. 2004 Feb;67(2):137-48
Publication Type
Article
Date
Feb-2004
Author
Kathi Wilson
Mark W Rosenberg
Author Affiliation
Department of Geography, University of Toronto at Mississauga, Mississauga, Ont., Canada L5L 1C6. kwilson@eratos.erin.utoronto.ca
Source
Health Policy. 2004 Feb;67(2):137-48
Date
Feb-2004
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Aged
Attitude to Health
Canada
Family Characteristics
Female
Health Care Surveys
Health Policy
Health Services Accessibility - standards
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
National Health Programs - organization & administration - standards - utilization
Public Opinion
Socioeconomic Factors
Waiting Lists
Abstract
The 1984 Canada Health Act (CHA) is the major piece of Federal legislation that governs health care accessibility in the provinces and territories. According to the CHA, all provinces and territories in Canada must uphold five principles in order to receive federal funding for health care (universality, comprehensiveness, portability, public administration, and accessibility). In Canada, there are competing views among policy makers and consumers about how the CHA's principle of accessibility should be defined, interpreted and used in delivering health care. During the 1990s, the health care perceptions of Canadians and their health care behaviours were measured through both public opinion polls and Statistics Canada's National Population Health Survey (NPHS). The goal of this paper is to examine perceptions of accessibility in public opinion polls and actual accessibility as measured through the NPHS. Public opinion polls demonstrate that while Canadians want to preserve the principles of the CHA, a majority of Canadians are losing confidence in their health care system. In contrast, the results from the NPHS reveal that only 6% of Canadians aged 25 years and older have experienced accessibility problems. Among those who report access problems, the barriers to accessibility are linked to specific socio-economic, socio-demographic and health characteristics of individuals. We discuss these findings in the context of the current debates surrounding accessibility within the CHA and the Canadian health care system.
PubMed ID
14720632 View in PubMed
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Accessing timely rehabilitation services for a global aging society? Exploring the realities within Canada's universal health care system.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature145394
Source
Curr Aging Sci. 2010 Jul;3(2):143-50
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jul-2010
Author
Michel D Landry
Sudha Raman
Elham Al-Hamdan
Author Affiliation
Department of Physical Therapy, Faculty of Medicine, University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario, Canada. mike.landry@utoronto.ca
Source
Curr Aging Sci. 2010 Jul;3(2):143-50
Date
Jul-2010
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Age Factors
Aged
Aging
Canada
Cooperative Behavior
Delivery of Health Care, Integrated - organization & administration
Health Services Accessibility - organization & administration
Health Services Needs and Demand - organization & administration
Health Services for the Aged - organization & administration
Humans
Interinstitutional Relations
National health programs - organization & administration
Organizational Objectives
Physical Therapy Modalities - organization & administration
Private Sector - organization & administration
Public Sector - organization & administration
Time Factors
World Health
Abstract
The proportion of older persons is increasing in developed and developing countries: this aging trend can be viewed as a two-edged sword. On the one hand, it represents remarkable successes regarding advances in health care; and on the other hand, it represents a considerable challenge for health systems to meet growing demand. A growing disequilibrium between supply and demand may be particularly challenging within publicly funding health systems that 'guarantee' services to eligible populations. Rehabilitation, including physical therapy, is a service that if provided in a timely manner, can maximize function and mobility for older persons, which may in turn optimize efficiency and effectiveness of overall health care systems. However, physical therapy services are not considered an insured service under the legislative framework of the Canadian health system, and as such, a complex public/private mix of funding and delivery has emerged. In this article, we explore the consequences of a public/private mix of physical therapy on timely access to services, and use the World Health Organization (WHO) health system performance framework to assess the extent to which the emerging system influences the goal of aggregated and equitable health. Overall, we argue that a shift to a public/private mix may not have positive influences at the population level, and that innovative approaches to deliver services would be desirable to strengthening rather than weaken the publicly funded system. We signal that strategies aimed at scaling up rehabilitation interventions are required in order to improve health outcomes in an evolving global aging society.
PubMed ID
20158495 View in PubMed
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Access to health-care in Canadian immigrants: a longitudinal study of the National Population Health Survey.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature139519
Source
Health Soc Care Community. 2011 Jan;19(1):70-9
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jan-2011
Author
Maninder Singh Setia
Amelie Quesnel-Vallee
Michal Abrahamowicz
Pierre Tousignant
John Lynch
Author Affiliation
Department of Epidemiology, Biostatistics, and Occupational Health, McGill University, Montreal, QC, Canada. maninder.setia@mail.mcgill.ca
Source
Health Soc Care Community. 2011 Jan;19(1):70-9
Date
Jan-2011
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Aged
Canada
Emigrants and Immigrants
Female
Health Care Surveys
Health Services Accessibility
Humans
Longitudinal Studies
Male
Middle Aged
National health programs - organization & administration
Abstract
Immigrants often lose their health advantage as they start adapting to the ways of the new society. Having access to care when it is needed is one way that individuals can maintain their health. We assessed the healthcare access in Canadian immigrants and the socioeconomic factors associated with access over a 12-year period. We compared two measures of healthcare access (having a regular doctor and reporting an unmet healthcare need in the past 12 months) among immigrants and Canadian-born men and women, aged more than 18 years. We applied a logistic random effects model to evaluate these outcomes separately, in 3081 males and 4187 females from the National Population Health Survey (1994-2006). Adjusting for all covariates, immigrant men and women (white and non-white) had similar odds of having a regular doctor than the Canadian-born individuals (white immigrants: males OR: 1.32, 95% C.I.: 0.89-1.94, females OR: 1.14, 95% C.I.: 0.78-1.66; non-white immigrants: males OR: 1.28, 95% C.I.: 0.73-2.23, females OR: 1.23, 95% C.I.: 0.64-2.36). Interestingly, non-white immigrant women had significantly fewer unmet health needs (OR: 0.32, 95% C.I.: 0.17-0.59). Among immigrants, time since immigration was associated with having access to a regular doctor (OR per year: 1.02, 95% C.I.: 1.00-1.04). Visible minority female immigrants were least likely to report an unmet healthcare need. In general, there is little evidence that immigrants have worse access to health-care than the Canadian-born population.
Notes
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PubMed ID
21054621 View in PubMed
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Access to health services by Canadians who are chronically ill.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature174970
Source
West J Nurs Res. 2005 Jun;27(4):465-86
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-2005
Author
Shannon M Spenceley
Author Affiliation
University of Alberta, Canada.
Source
West J Nurs Res. 2005 Jun;27(4):465-86
Date
Jun-2005
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Attitude to Health
Canada - epidemiology
Chronic Disease - epidemiology - psychology - therapy
Data Collection - standards
Data Interpretation, Statistical
Health Care Reform - organization & administration
Health Services Accessibility - organization & administration
Health Services Research - organization & administration
Humans
National health programs - organization & administration
Needs Assessment - organization & administration
Research Design - standards
Abstract
Access to health care services in Canada has been identified as an urgent priority, and chronic disease has been suggested as the most pressing health concern facing Canadians. Access to services for Canadians living with chronic disease, however, has received little emphasis in the research literature or in health policy reform documents. A systematic review of research into factors impeding or facilitating access to formal health services for people in Canada living with chronic illness is presented. The review includes 31 studies of Canadian populations published between 1990 and 2002; main results were analyzed for facilitators and barriers to access for people experiencing chronic disease. An underlying organizing construct of symmetry between consumers, providers, and the larger Canadian system is suggested as a relevant lens from which to view the findings. Finally, a discussion of the relationship between identified factors and the principles of primary health care is offered.
PubMed ID
15870244 View in PubMed
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Access to medicines and global health: will Canada lead or flounder?

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature181912
Source
CMAJ. 2004 Jan 20;170(2):224-6
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jan-20-2004
Author
James Orbinski
Author Affiliation
St. Michael's Hospital, Centre for International Health, University of Toronto, Toronto, Ont. james.orbinski@utoronto.ca
Source
CMAJ. 2004 Jan 20;170(2):224-6
Date
Jan-20-2004
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Canada
Drug Costs
Drug Industry - organization & administration
Drugs, Essential - supply & distribution
Forecasting
Health Policy
Health Services Accessibility
Humans
National health programs - organization & administration
Needs Assessment
Patents as Topic
World Health
Notes
Comment In: CMAJ. 2004 Apr 27;170(9):1374; author reply 1374-515111456
PubMed ID
14734437 View in PubMed
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Accountability: unpacking the suitcase.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature168409
Source
Healthc Q. 2006;9(3):72-5, 4
Publication Type
Article
Date
2006
Author
Adalsteinn D Brown
Christina Porcellato
Jan Barnsley
Author Affiliation
Ontario Ministry of Health and Long-term Care.
Source
Healthc Q. 2006;9(3):72-5, 4
Date
2006
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Canada
Decision Making, Organizational
Health Policy
Health Services Research
Humans
Information Services
Management Audit
National health programs - organization & administration
Program Evaluation
Quality Assurance, Health Care
Quality Indicators, Health Care
Social Responsibility
Abstract
"Accountability" is the suitcase word in Canadian healthcare. As policy-makers, managers, researchers and providers, we pack accountability with meaning, carry it around with us and open it up to explain everything from the quality of our relationships with and expectations of one another, to our requirements for more transparency in the use of resources, to our diagnosis of problems and remedies for improving our healthcare system.
PubMed ID
16826770 View in PubMed
Less detail
Source
Health Soc Serv J. 1979 Feb 15;89(4628):154-6
Publication Type
Article
Date
Feb-15-1979
Author
D. Townsend
Source
Health Soc Serv J. 1979 Feb 15;89(4628):154-6
Date
Feb-15-1979
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Education of Intellectually Disabled
Humans
Intellectual Disability - rehabilitation
National health programs - organization & administration
Social Values
Sweden
Abstract
The deep-rooted respect of the value of each individual in Sweden is shown in its community-based care of the mentally handicapped. Author looks at the lessons Britain can learn in this field.
PubMed ID
10240494 View in PubMed
Less detail
Source
Soins Pediatr Pueric. 2004 Aug;(219):33-40
Publication Type
Article
Date
Aug-2004

471 records – page 1 of 48.