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Changes in the nasal mucosa of furniture workers. A pilot study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature27003
Source
Scand J Work Environ Health. 1982 Dec;8(4):273-82
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-1982
Author
M. Boysen
L A Solberg
Source
Scand J Work Environ Health. 1982 Dec;8(4):273-82
Date
Dec-1982
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Aged
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Nasal Mucosa - pathology
Nasopharyngeal Neoplasms - etiology
Norway
Occupational Diseases - etiology
Pilot Projects
Precancerous Conditions - etiology
Regression Analysis
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Smoking
Wood
Abstract
The present study was carried out in order to evaluate whether precancerous lesions could be detected in the nasal mucosa of furniture workers. Histological examination of nasal biopsies from 113 workers (103 active and 10 retired) and 54 referents was performed. The histological sections were evaluated blindly according to a numerical classification scale, and the results were compared, by means of multiple regression analysis, to age, type and duration of exposure to wood dust, smoking habits, nasal allergy, and rhinoscopic findings. Nasal stenosis and mechanical wood preparation were significantly related to the histological findings by the partial correlation coefficients. Fourteen cases (12%) of dysplasia were found among the furniture workers, preferentially among those performing mechanical wood preparation, and among the referents there was one (2%). The evaluation of the importance of exposure to dust of individual types of wood was not possible. Nasal epithelial dysplasia should probably be interpreted as a preneoplastic lesion and may be of significance in the pathogenesis of nasal adenocarcinoma. Standard nasal biopsies appear to be valuable in identifying groups of persons with an increased incidence of nasal carcinoma.
PubMed ID
7170624 View in PubMed
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Early primary infection and high Epstein-Barr virus antibody titers in Greenland Eskimos at high risk for nasopharyngeal carcinoma.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature4214
Source
Int J Cancer. 1984 Nov 15;34(5):619-23
Publication Type
Article
Date
Nov-15-1984
Author
M. Melbye
P. Ebbesen
P H Levine
T. Bennike
Source
Int J Cancer. 1984 Nov 15;34(5):619-23
Date
Nov-15-1984
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Antibodies, Viral - analysis
Child
Child, Preschool
Comparative Study
Denmark
European Continental Ancestry Group
Family
Female
Greenland
Herpesvirus 4, Human - immunology
Humans
Infant
Infectious Mononucleosis - microbiology
Inuits
Male
Nasopharyngeal Neoplasms - etiology - microbiology
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Risk
Sex Factors
Abstract
In a comparative study of populations at high and low risk of nasopharyngeal carcinoma (NPC), sera from 442 Eskimo and 770 Danish children and adolescents were tested for the presence of antibodies against Epstein-Barr virus (EBV). Eskimo children in Greenland were seropositive at an early age and showed significantly higher titers of IgG antibody to the viral capsid antigen (VCA) (p less than 0.0001) and soluble (S) antigen (p less than 0.005) than Danes matched for age and sex, but had similar levels of IgA antibody to VCA and IgG antibody to the early antigen (EA). The high geometric mean VCA (IgG) titers found in certain age groups of Eskimo children were as high as those previously reported from areas in Africa highly endemic for Burkitt's lymphoma. In Greenland, neither location nor household size was a determining factor for prevalence or titer of VCA (IgG). The high antibody titers among Eskimo children probably reflect exposure to a large inoculum of EBV at the time of primary infection, infection early in life and/or re-exposure due to the higher incidence of EBV infection in Greenland. In view of the high incidence of NPC in Greenland and the known association of this tumor with EBV, we speculate that the time and quantitative aspects of the primary infection are also factors of relevance in the etiology of NPC.
PubMed ID
6094363 View in PubMed
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Epstein-Barr virus activation in Raji cells by extracts of preserved food from high risk areas for nasopharyngeal carcinoma.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature25827
Source
Carcinogenesis. 1988 Aug;9(8):1455-7
Publication Type
Article
Date
Aug-1988
Author
Y M Shao
S. Poirier
H. Ohshima
C. Malaveille
Y. Zeng
G. de Thé
H. Bartsch
Author Affiliation
CNRS Laboratory of Epidemiology and Immunology of Tumours, Faculty of Medicine A. Carrel, Lyon, France.
Source
Carcinogenesis. 1988 Aug;9(8):1455-7
Date
Aug-1988
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
China
Food Habits
Food Preservation
Herpesvirus 4, Human - drug effects - pathogenicity
Humans
Nasopharyngeal Neoplasms - etiology
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Virus Activation - drug effects
Abstract
Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) activation of latent infection and traditional life styles, especially food habits, have been strongly associated with an increased risk of nasopharyngeal carcinoma (NPC) in humans. On the basis of anthropological studies in Tunisia, southern China and Greenland, extracts of representative preserved food items consumed frequently by the high-risk populations for NPC were assayed for the presence of EBV activators in Raji cells. A strong EBV activation activity was observed in aqueous extracts of some Cantonese salted dried fish from China, harissa (a spice mixture) and to a lesser extent qaddid (dry mutton preserved in olive oil) from Tunisia. These new data may support epidemiological evidence for the importance of Cantonese salted and dried fish and other food items in the etiology of NPC.
PubMed ID
2841048 View in PubMed
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Sinonasal cancer and exposure to softwood.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature26674
Source
Acta Otolaryngol. 1985 Jan-Feb;99(1-2):172-8
Publication Type
Article
Author
R. Voss
T. Stenersen
B. Roald Oppedal
M. Boysen
Source
Acta Otolaryngol. 1985 Jan-Feb;99(1-2):172-8
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adenocarcinoma - etiology
Adult
Aged
Dust - adverse effects
Female
Humans
Lymphoma - etiology
Male
Middle Aged
Nasopharyngeal Neoplasms - etiology
Nose Neoplasms - etiology
Occupational Diseases - etiology
Paranasal Sinus Neoplasms - etiology
Risk
Wood
Abstract
In order to study the connection between occupation and sinonasal cancer we have reviewed the files and histological sections of 70 patients (24 females and 46 males) treated at the Department of Oto-rhino-laryngology, National Hospital of Norway. Detailed information concerning previous occupations was obtained by telephone interviews according to a standardized questionnaire. This pilot study revealed a strong association between wood dust exposure and sinonasal cancer. Of 12 wood dust exposed men, 11 had been exposed exclusively to softwood. While squamous cell carcinoma was the predominant type of cancer in joiners, carpenters and loggers, non-Hodgkin lymphomas appeared to be associated with employment in saw- and planingmill firms. A nationwide case-control study is under preparation for further substantiation of the health hazards connected with exposure to softwood and other possible occupational factors related to sinonasal cancer.
PubMed ID
3976390 View in PubMed
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Wood exposure and smoking: association with cancer of the nasal cavity and paranasal sinuses in British Columbia.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature244406
Source
Can Med Assoc J. 1981 Jun 15;124(12):1573-7
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-15-1981
Author
J M Elwood
Source
Can Med Assoc J. 1981 Jun 15;124(12):1573-7
Date
Jun-15-1981
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adenocarcinoma - etiology
British Columbia
Humans
Male
Nasopharyngeal Neoplasms - etiology
Occupational Diseases - etiology
Paranasal Sinus Neoplasms - etiology
Retrospective Studies
Smoking
Wood
Abstract
A case-control study of 121 men seen for cancer of the nasal cavity or paranasal sinuses in British Columbia between 1939 and 1977 showed increased relative risks associated with occupations involving exposure to wood (2.5) and with smoking (4.9). The occupations involved were chiefly forestry and carpentry. Both risk factors appeared to be associated with the principal sites within the nasal cavity paranasal sinuses and with most histologic subtypes of cancer.
Notes
Cites: Br Med J. 1968 Jun 8;2(5605):587-965654629
Cites: Ann Otol Rhinol Laryngol. 1971 Oct;80(5):699-7035110879
Cites: Br J Ind Med. 1972;29(1):21-305060244
Cites: Cancer. 1975 Sep;36(3):1115-241182665
Cites: Cancer Res. 1977 Oct;37(10):3473-4908001
Cites: Br J Ind Med. 1977 Aug;34(3):201-7911690
Cites: Am J Epidemiol. 1978 Mar;107(3):245-56629262
Cites: Acta Otolaryngol. 1978 Nov-Dec;86(5-6):437-42716866
Cites: Lancet. 1979 Mar 31;1(8118):695-685936
PubMed ID
7248866 View in PubMed
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6 records – page 1 of 1.