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A diversity of voices: the McGill 'Working with Culture' seminars.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature115037
Source
Cult Med Psychiatry. 2013 Jun;37(2):347-64
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-2013
Author
Jaswant Guzder
Cécile Rousseau
Author Affiliation
McGill University, Montreal, QC, Canada. jaswant.guzder@mcgill.ca
Source
Cult Med Psychiatry. 2013 Jun;37(2):347-64
Date
Jun-2013
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Canada
Cultural Competency - education
Curriculum
Group Processes
Humans
Mental health services
Narrative Therapy
Prejudice - psychology
Psychotherapy - education
Teaching - methods
Vulnerable Populations - psychology
Abstract
The Working with Culture seminar is offered as a course during the month long Annual McGill Summer Program for Social and Transcultural Psychiatry, attended by local and international participants each May since 1994. The article outlines some of the premises and pedagogical approaches of this clinically oriented biweekly seminar series with discussions and didactic teaching on cultural dimensions of mental health care. The course readings, seminar topics and invited speakers focus mainly on therapist client encounters constructed by the multiple voices with dimensions of psychiatric, social, historical, legal, ethical, political, systemic and intra-psychic domains. The dual leadership emphasizes the gaps and complementarity amongst voices, and it invites and supports a destabilizing decentering process and the creation of solidarities amongst participants. Applying a bio-psychosocial case study method, each 3-h seminar engages the participants in a critical dialogue on apprehending the enmeshment of social suffering with psychiatric disorders whilst examining the usefulness and the limits of cultural formulation models. The seminar working group and teaching approach acknowledges cultural hybridity as a dynamic process marked by continuous therapist attunement to uncertainty or 'not knowing' which implies a dethroning of an expert position.
Notes
Comment In: Cult Med Psychiatry. 2013 Jun;37(2):390-723564248
PubMed ID
23549711 View in PubMed
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Publication Type
Book/Book Chapter
Date
1981
Author
Ehringhaus, Michael
Date
1981
Language
English
Geographic Location
U.S.
Publication Type
Book/Book Chapter
Physical Holding
University of Alaska Anchorage
Keywords
Multiple sclerosis -- Biography
Multiple sclerosis -- Personal narratives
Notes
RC377.E47 1981
Based on transcripts by and interviews with Glenda Moore
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Healing our people: Alaskan approaches to cross-cultural counseling, planning and treatment

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature101970
Source
Sections of a report produced by Southcentral Foundation.
Date
1995
Author
Southcentral Foundation
Source
Sections of a report produced by Southcentral Foundation.
Date
1995
Language
English
Central Yup'ik
Geographic Location
U.S.
Physical Holding
University of Alaska Anchorage
Keywords
Belief systems
Client culture
Culturally sensitive health care
'Eye of Awareness' model
Illness models
Illness narratives
Mental health
Abstract
This report describes some of the methods being developed at Southcentral Foundation to get practical information so that more culturally sensitive and effective mental health services can be provided. The report gives some general introduction and background and then presents some clinical case material in detail. Every effort is made to get the exact words of the client, in their Native language. There is extensive discussion between mental health professionals and cultural mentors as to what the illness narratives mean, and best ways to help. Samples are given of some of the comments that emerged from this dialogue process, including some beginning description of Yup'ik concepts about mental health.
Notes
Available upon request at the Alaska Medical Library, located on the second floor of UAA/APU Consortium Library. Ask for accession no. 101970.
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The historical-ethnographic image of the drinking peoples of the North.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature296255
Source
Electronic Journal of Folklore. vol 61. p. [135-156].
Publication Type
Article
Date
2015
century. From the evidence, I conclude that the appear- ance and long-term survival of the ethnographic image of a drinking native of the North has been possible because of adaptation of this idea to specific temporary narrative strategies. In different periods this idea of Arctic drinking has been
  1 document  
Source
Electronic Journal of Folklore. vol 61. p. [135-156].
Date
2015
Language
English
Geographic Location
Russia
Publication Type
Article
File Size
2605124
Keywords
Alcohol
Drinking
Image
Narrative
Northern peoples
Abstract
In this paper I aim to analyse descriptions of Arctic peoples’ drinking as one of the oldest stereotypes concerning inhabitants of the North. I intend to explore philosophical frameworks and ways of observation that influenced the appearance and maintenance of the image of a drinking northerner in literature through the millennia. I have examined different sources that provide descriptions of northern drinking as well as scientific and philosophical texts that reveal how the image of indigenous people and drinking is introduced and supported in the writings of intellectuals in different time periods. I have discovered that since classical antiquity, scholars and travellers have believed that people drink more in the north than they do in the south. Later on, medieval and Enlightenment authors developed this understanding about northern drinking according to religious and philosophical paradigms of their eras. My evidence also shows that drinking was included in the mainstream intellectual discourse concerning the Arctic since the 19th century. From the evidence, I conclude that the appearance and long-term survival of the ethnographic image of a drinking native of the North has been possible because of adaptation of this idea to specific temporary narrative strategies. In different periods this idea of Arctic drinking has been applied to specific theoretical and philosophical settings. This adaptability has made the idea about drinking in the North a rather powerful cognitive model of the northern indigenous peoples.
Documents
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Historical narratives and human kinds: The evolution of Inuit childbirth into the 21st century

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature257054
Source
Page 229 in S. Chatwood, P. Orr and Tiina Ikaheimo, eds. Proceedings of the 14th International Congress on Circumpolar Health, Yellowknife, Canada, July 11-16, 2009. Securing the IPY Legacy: from Research to Action. International Journal of Circumpolar Health 2010; 69 (Suppl 7).
Publication Type
Conference/Meeting Material
Date
2010
HISTORICAL NARRATIVES AND HUMAN KINDS, THE EVOLUTION OF INUIT CHILDBIRTH INTO THE 21ST CENTURY V. Douglas University of Alberta Objectives: To construct a theoretical framework within which the historical evolution of Inuit childbirth practices may be situated. Study Design: This study
  1 document  
Author
Douglas V
Author Affiliation
University of Alberta
Source
Page 229 in S. Chatwood, P. Orr and Tiina Ikaheimo, eds. Proceedings of the 14th International Congress on Circumpolar Health, Yellowknife, Canada, July 11-16, 2009. Securing the IPY Legacy: from Research to Action. International Journal of Circumpolar Health 2010; 69 (Suppl 7).
Date
2010
Language
English
Geographic Location
Canada
Publication Type
Conference/Meeting Material
Digital File Format
Text - PDF
Physical Holding
University of Alaska Anchorage
Keywords
Arctic
Birth
Canada
Childbirth
Historical narrative
Historical literature
Inuit
Notes
Part of Abstracts: Oral Presentations. Chapter 6. Maternal and Child Health.
Documents
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Indigenous knowledges in global contexts: Multiple readings of our world

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature76453
Source
University of Toronto Press
Publication Type
Book/Book Chapter
Date
2000
Source
University of Toronto Press
Date
2000
Language
English
Publication Type
Book/Book Chapter
Keywords
Aboriginal traditions
Advocacy
Cultural perspectives
Folkways
Indigenous peoples
Native studies
Oral narratives
Abstract
This collection of essays challenges the continuing absence, erasure, and subordination of local people's knowledge, history, and experience from academic texts, discourses, and material social and political practices, particularly in Northern societies. [extract from introduction]
Notes
Library does not own this title.
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'I will be at death's door and realize that I've wasted maybe half of my life on one body part': the experience of living with body dysmorphic disorder.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature281549
Source
Int J Psychiatry Clin Pract. 2016 Sep;20(3):191-8
Publication Type
Article
Date
Sep-2016
Author
Sabina Brohede
Barbro Wijma
Klaas Wijma
Karin Blomberg
Source
Int J Psychiatry Clin Pract. 2016 Sep;20(3):191-8
Date
Sep-2016
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Body Dysmorphic Disorders - psychology
Female
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Personal Narratives as Topic
Qualitative Research
Sweden
Young Adult
Abstract
The purpose of this study was to explore the experiences of patients living with body dysmorphic disorder (BDD), including their experiences with the health care system.
Fifteen individuals with BDD were interviewed, and interpretive description was used to analyse the interviews.
The following six themes were identified: being absorbed in time-consuming procedures, facing tension between one's own ideal and the perceived reality, becoming the disorder, being restricted in life, attempting to reduce one's problems and striving to receive care. The overarching concept derived from the themes was feeling imprisoned - struggling to become free and to no longer feel abnormal.
Ideas of imprisonment and abnormality compose the entire experience of living with this disorder. Although the participants suffered greatly from their BDD, these patients encountered difficulties in accessing health care and had disappointing experiences during their encounters with the health care system. Therefore, it is important to increase awareness and knowledge of BDD among health care professionals to ensure that patients with BDD receive the appropriate care.
PubMed ID
27314665 View in PubMed
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The journals of William Fraser Tolmie, physician and fur trader.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature288669
Source
Vancouver, Can. : Mitchell Press. 413 p.
Publication Type
Book/Book Chapter
Date
1963
Author
Tolmie, William Fraser
Source
Vancouver, Can. : Mitchell Press. 413 p.
Date
1963
Language
English
Geographic Location
U.S.
Canada
Publication Type
Book/Book Chapter
Physical Holding
University of Alaska Anchorage
Keywords
Physicians -- Canada -- Personal Narratives
Victoria, British Columbia
Hudson's Bay Company
Frontier medicine
Notes
ALASKA R464.T6A3 1963
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The loss of a mother and dealing with genetic cancer risk: women who have undergone prophylactic removal of the ovaries.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature263607
Source
Eur J Oncol Nurs. 2014 Oct;18(5):521-6
Publication Type
Article
Date
Oct-2014
Author
Marie Kvamme Mæland
Elin Overaa Eriksen
Oddgeir Synnes
Source
Eur J Oncol Nurs. 2014 Oct;18(5):521-6
Date
Oct-2014
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Decision Making
Female
Genetic Predisposition to Disease
Humans
Middle Aged
Mother-Child Relations
Narrative Therapy - methods
Norway
Ovarian Neoplasms - genetics - prevention & control
Ovariectomy
Prophylactic Surgical Procedures
Risk factors
Abstract
The purpose of this article is to highlight some new findings from a qualitative study that have not been previously considered.
The research was based on a qualitative phenomenological method. Data were collected by semi-structured individual interviews. A purposeful sample was recruited from West Norway of 14 women with a possible risk of developing breast and ovarian cancer. Data collection took place at least one year after prophylactic removal of the ovaries. Data from the study was analyzed according to the phenomenological method of Amedeo Giorgi.
Two themes were revealed as essential factors of the interviewed women's experiences: "the loss of a mother" and "dealing with genetic cancer risk." For the most part, these two themes also appeared to be interrelated. When a mother died of ovarian cancer while her daughter was a child or a young woman, this often led to her daughter's strong desire to find an explanation for her mother's death, as well as to her efforts to undergo genetic testing and surgery to prevent cancer in her family in the future.
The study indicates that women's experiences in families at risk of hereditary cancer are closely related to an understanding of their life stories, particularly their "loss of a mother," and how this influences how they deal with genetic cancer risk. Health care workers can thus help patients identify connections and establish coherence through the act of storytelling, by listening to their illness experiences as part of their life stories.
PubMed ID
24880189 View in PubMed
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19 records – page 1 of 2.