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478 records – page 1 of 48.

After methods, the story: from incongruity to truth in qualitative research.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature181181
Source
Qual Health Res. 2004 Mar;14(3):430-40
Publication Type
Article
Date
Mar-2004
Author
Arthur W Frank
Author Affiliation
University of Calgary.
Source
Qual Health Res. 2004 Mar;14(3):430-40
Date
Mar-2004
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Alberta
Humans
Narration
Qualitative Research
Writing
Abstract
Writing is the integral part of research when a story is crafted. This story makes whatever claim the research will have on readers, and social scientists have increasingly recognized the need to take their storytelling seriously. Discussion of several contemporary ethnographies offers practical advice on writing by asking how the authors tell such good stories. Advice begins with how to catch readers' attention and moves to issues of telling the truth in postmodern times.
PubMed ID
15011908 View in PubMed
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Pastoral counseling and pastoral care: is there a difference?

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature185537
Source
J Pastoral Care Counsel. 2003;57(1):3-14
Publication Type
Article
Date
2003
Author
Thomas St James O'Connor
Author Affiliation
Pastoral Care and Counseling Waterloo Lutheran Seminary, Ontario, Canada, N2L 3C5.
Source
J Pastoral Care Counsel. 2003;57(1):3-14
Date
2003
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Canada
Counseling
Evidence-Based Medicine
Humans
Narration
Pastoral Care
Abstract
The author argues that there is little difference between pastoral counseling and pastoral care. Utilizing an evidence-based and narrative approach, he examines the ideas of a variety of historical and contemporary writers to illustrate this thesis. Along with historical and contemporary writings on the topic, the author includes his own clinical experiences and associations to illustrate his conviction that pastoral counseling and pastoral care are more alike than different.
PubMed ID
12728759 View in PubMed
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Yarning/Aboriginal storytelling: towards an understanding of an Indigenous perspective and its implications for research practice.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature104544
Source
Contemp Nurse. 2013 Dec;46(1):13-7
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-2013
Author
Lynore K Geia
Barbara Hayes
Kim Usher
Author Affiliation
School of Nursing, Midwifery and Nutrition, James Cook University, Townsville, QLD, Australia, 2. Lynore K Geia is a proud woman of Bwgcolman, born and raised on Palm Island, Queensland.
Source
Contemp Nurse. 2013 Dec;46(1):13-7
Date
Dec-2013
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Health Services Research - organization & administration
Humans
Narration
Oceanic Ancestry Group
Abstract
There is increasing recognition of Indigenous perspectives from various parts of the world in relation to storytelling, research and its effects on practice. The recent emergence of storytelling or yarning as a research method in Australian Aboriginal and Torres Strait Island studies and other Indigenous peoples of the world is gaining momentum. Narratives, stories, storytelling and yarning are emerging methods in research and has wide ranging potential to shape conventional research discourse making research more meaningful and accessible for researchers. In this paper we argue for the importance of Indigenous research methods and Indigenous method(ology), within collaborative respectful partnerships with non-Indigenous researchers. It is imperative to take these challenging steps together towards better outcomes for Indigenous people and their communities. In the Australian context we as researchers cannot afford to allow the gap between Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islanders and mainstream Australia health outcomes to grow even wider. One such pathway is the inclusion of Aboriginal storytelling or yarning from an Aboriginal and Torres Strait perspective within Indigenous and non-Indigenous research paradigms. Utilising Aboriginal storytelling or yarning will provide deeper understanding; complementing a two-way research paradigm for collaborative research. Furthermore, it has significant social implications for research and clinical practice amongst Indigenous populations; thus complementing the biomedical medical paradigm.
PubMed ID
24716757 View in PubMed
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Chapter 8. An indigenous narrative of resilience: Malama ko Aloha.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature102716
Source
Subst Use Misuse. 2013 Nov;48(13):1369-76
Publication Type
Article
Date
Nov-2013
Author
Jeannette L Johnson
Keola Beamer
Source
Subst Use Misuse. 2013 Nov;48(13):1369-76
Date
Nov-2013
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Culture
Hawaii
Humans
Narration
Oceanic ancestry group - psychology
Resilience, Psychological
Abstract
Many indigenous cultures use storytelling as the foundation for the transmission of important cultural information. Stories passed down from generation to generation sometimes teach, record history, provide examples, or inform. One important function of storytelling is the transmission of stories about cultural resilience illustrating how a cultural group has kept strong in the face of adversity. This article shows how storytelling in the Hawaiian culture has been used for this purpose and how the Beamer family has served as the master storytellers of their culture, keeping the culture and traditions alive through their music, dance, and stories.
PubMed ID
24087870 View in PubMed
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The question of professionalization: a narrative.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature121614
Source
HEC Forum. 2012 Sep;24(3):179-86
Publication Type
Article
Date
Sep-2012
Author
Delphine Roigt
Author Affiliation
Centre hospitalier de l'Université de Montréal, CHUM-Hôtel-Dieu, Montreal, QC, Canada. delphine.roigt.chum@ssss.gouv.qc.ca
Source
HEC Forum. 2012 Sep;24(3):179-86
Date
Sep-2012
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Bioethics
Ethicists
Humans
Narration
Professional Competence
Professional Practice
Professional Role
Quebec
Abstract
For quite some time now, there have been discussions and debates in North America in the field of ethics concerning professionalization. From a talk given to graduate and undergraduate university students, the author tells the personal journey of an ethicist in the province of Quebec, Canada, and offers a narrative to illustrate some of the issues she faced since starting her work in the field of ethics at the end of the 1990s. Instead of taking the usual "for" and "against" positions, the author addresses the issue of professionalization of healthcare ethics from her own point of view. Referring to her experience with ethics committees and research ethics boards and to the works of George A. Legault in Crise d'identité professionnelle et Professionnalisme (Presses de l'Université du Québec, Sainte-Foy, 2003), she pleads for the development of practice standards and the creation of a deliberative process (see Kirby and Simpson in this issue of HEC Forum 2012), a dialogical space for assuring professionalism in healthcare ethics interventions, not solely the act of becoming a profession.
PubMed ID
22893214 View in PubMed
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Narrative research--learning from stories.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature156948
Source
Can Oncol Nurs J. 2008;18(1):2-4
Publication Type
Article
Date
2008
Author
Karin Olson
Source
Can Oncol Nurs J. 2008;18(1):2-4
Date
2008
Language
English
French
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Alberta
Bereavement
Female
Humans
Male
Narration
Nursing Research - methods
Palliative Care
PubMed ID
18512564 View in PubMed
Less detail
Source
Can Fam Physician. 2007 Nov;53(11):1882; author reply 1882-3
Publication Type
Article
Date
Nov-2007
Author
Peter Dunlop
Source
Can Fam Physician. 2007 Nov;53(11):1882; author reply 1882-3
Date
Nov-2007
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Complementary Therapies - methods
Family Practice - methods
Humans
Narration
Needs Assessment
Ontario
Notes
Cites: Can Fam Physician. 2007 Aug;53(8):1265-717872831
Comment On: Can Fam Physician. 2007 Aug;53(8):1265-717872831
PubMed ID
18000254 View in PubMed
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Towards automated classification of intensive care nursing narratives.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature163476
Source
Int J Med Inform. 2007 Dec;76 Suppl 3:S362-8
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-2007
Author
Marketta Hiissa
Tapio Pahikkala
Hanna Suominen
Tuija Lehtikunnas
Barbro Back
Helena Karsten
Sanna Salanterä
Tapio Salakoski
Author Affiliation
Turku Centre for Computer Science, Joukahaisenkatu 3-5 B, 20520 Turku, Finland. marketta.hiissa@abo.fi
Source
Int J Med Inform. 2007 Dec;76 Suppl 3:S362-8
Date
Dec-2007
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Algorithms
Classification
Finland
Humans
Intensive Care
Narration
Nursing Informatics
ROC Curve
Abstract
Nursing narratives are an important part of patient documentation, but the possibilities to utilize them in the direct care process are limited due to the lack of proper tools. One solution to facilitate the utilization of narrative data could be to classify them according to their content.
Our objective is to address two issues related to designing an automated classifier: domain experts' agreement on the content of classes Breathing, Blood Circulation and Pain, as well as the ability of a machine-learning-based classifier to learn the classification patterns of the nurses.
The data we used were a set of Finnish intensive care nursing narratives, and we used the regularized least-squares (RLS) algorithm for the automatic classification. The agreement of the nurses was assessed by using Cohen's kappa, and the performance of the algorithm was measured using area under ROC curve (AUC).
On average, the values of kappa were around 0.8. The agreement was highest in the class Blood Circulation, and lowest in the class Breathing. The RLS algorithm was able to learn the classification patterns of the three nurses on an acceptable level; the values of AUC were generally around 0.85.
Our results indicate that the free text in nursing documentation can be automatically classified and this can offer a way to develop electronic patient records.
PubMed ID
17513166 View in PubMed
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Counter-memory activism in the aftermath of tragedy: a case study of the Westray Families Group.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature134363
Source
Can Rev Sociol. 2011 Feb;48(1):23-45
Publication Type
Article
Date
Feb-2011
Author
Norine Verberg
Christopher G Davis
Author Affiliation
Department of Sociology, St. Francis Xavier University, PO Box 5000, Antigonish, NS, Canada B2G 2E8. nverberg@stfx.ca
Source
Can Rev Sociol. 2011 Feb;48(1):23-45
Date
Feb-2011
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Accidents, Occupational - psychology
Adaptation, Psychological
Canada
Family - psychology
Humans
Male
Mining
Narration
Abstract
Narratives are critical to how people understand themselves and the significant events of their lives. Drawing upon social memory theory and the social constructionist approach to social problems, this study provides a narrative analysis of the counter-memory activism of the Westray Families Group (WFG), which formed after 26 men died in the 1992 Westray mine explosion (Plymouth, NS). Against alternative explanations promoted by more powerful stakeholders, the WFG adopted and weaved a corporate negligence narrative into their commemorative activism. This study illustrates how a small families group can draw reflexively upon and reshape cultural scripts to narrate how others should remember and respond to key events.
PubMed ID
21595369 View in PubMed
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Fifteen minute stories about training.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature130045
Source
J Anal Psychol. 2011 Nov;56(5):627-52
Publication Type
Article
Date
Nov-2011
Author
Catherine Crowther
Jan Wiener
Alena Tserashchuk
Vladimir Tsivinsky
Elena Volodina
Natalia L Alexandrova
Source
J Anal Psychol. 2011 Nov;56(5):627-52
Date
Nov-2011
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Cross-Cultural Comparison
Culture
Humans
Jungian Theory
Narration
Psychoanalysis - education - methods
Russia
Abstract
This panel presentation at the Journal's conference in St Petersburg responded to the conference theme of 'Ancestors in Personal, Professional and Social History' by relating it to the experience of training and being trained on the IAAP 'router' programme in Russia. The two organizers of the programme (JW and CC) have worked in Russia for over 12 years, bringing analysts from Britain to Moscow and St Petersburg on a 'shuttle' basis as supervisors and personal analysts. A few months after handing over the router programme in December 2010 to the Russian colleagues they had trained, they invited four analysts, three Russian and one Belarusian, to tell a short personal story about their training, linking it to the theme of 'the Ancestors'. The resulting four stories are very different but complement each other, using imagery to illustrate issues concerning both value and ambivalence. JW and CC jointly wrote their story about the programme in response to the four stories, reflecting on some of their themes and from them, giving consideration to the flexibility and limits of such a model of cross-cultural training. Themes in the stories included the possibility of mutual adaptation to another culture without losing tradition and identity; moving on from doctrinaire Soviet attitudes in education to embrace 'not knowing'; both organizers and routers learning from mistakes and from joint experience without guilt or shame; the need to protect reflective space amidst the constraints of time and geography. All Russian and UK contributors could finally acknowledge their shared luck to find themselves in the right place at the right time to respond to the collective revival of psychoanalytic practice in Russia.
PubMed ID
22039945 View in PubMed
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478 records – page 1 of 48.