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30 records – page 1 of 3.

The association of Epstein-Barr virus and nasopharyngeal carcinoma: An update of studies among Alaskan Natives.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature1380
Source
Pages 268-271 in B. Harvald and J.P. Hart Hansen, eds. Circumpolar Health 81. Proceedings of the International Symposium on Circumpolar Health, 5th, Copenhagen, 9-13 August, 1981.
Publication Type
Article
Date
[1982?]
increased risk of developing nasopharyngeal carcinoma (NPC} (1,2,3). At the fourth Circum- polar Health Conference, data on NPC among Alaskan natives was presented. This report will provide current data and in particular on studies of NPC and Epstein-Barr virus (EBV} among Alaska natives. During the 15
  1 document  
Author
Lanier, A.P.
Author Affiliation
U.S. Centers for Disease Control
Source
Pages 268-271 in B. Harvald and J.P. Hart Hansen, eds. Circumpolar Health 81. Proceedings of the International Symposium on Circumpolar Health, 5th, Copenhagen, 9-13 August, 1981.
Date
[1982?]
Language
English
Geographic Location
U.S.
Publication Type
Article
Digital File Format
Text - PDF
Physical Holding
Alaska Medical Library
Keywords
EBV
NPC
Notes
From: Fortuine, Robert et al. 1993. The Health of the Inuit of North America: A Bibliography from the Earliest Times through 1990. University of Alaska Anchorage. Citation number 2214.
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Cancer among northern Quebec Inuit: some preliminary results before the implementation of a cancer registry.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature710
Source
Arctic Medical Research. 47(3):131-135.
Publication Type
Article
Date
1988
Author
Dufour, R.
Author Affiliation
Laval University
Source
Arctic Medical Research. 47(3):131-135.
Date
1988
Language
English
Geographic Location
Canada
Publication Type
Article
Physical Holding
Alaska Medical Library
Keywords
Carcinoma of the lung
Carcinoma of the colon and rectum
NPC
Carcinoma of the cervix
Cancer registry
Notes
From: Fortuine, Robert et al. 1993. The Health of the Inuit of North America: A Bibliography from the Earliest Times through 1990. University of Alaska Anchorage. Citation number 2150.
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Cancer au nouveau-québec Inuit: résultats d'une enquête préalable à la création d'un registre des cancers.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature709
Source
Canadian Journal of Public Health. 78:267-270.
Publication Type
Article
Date
1987
Author
Dufour, R.
Author Affiliation
Laval University
Source
Canadian Journal of Public Health. 78:267-270.
Date
1987
Language
English
Geographic Location
Canada
Publication Type
Article
Physical Holding
Alaska Medical Library
Keywords
Carcinoma of the lung
Carcinoma of the colon and rectum
Carcinoma of the cervix
NPC
Smoking
Cancer registry
Notes
From: Fortuine, Robert et al. 1993. The Health of the Inuit of North America: A Bibliography from the Earliest Times through 1990. University of Alaska Anchorage. Citation number 2149.
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Cancer in Alaskan Indians, Eskimos, and Aleuts.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature4253
Source
Journal of the National Cancer Institute. 1980 Nov;65(5):1157-9
Publication Type
Article
Date
Nov-1980
Author
A P Lanier
W J Blot
T R Bender
J F Fraumeni
Source
Journal of the National Cancer Institute. 1980 Nov;65(5):1157-9
Date
Nov-1980
Language
English
Geographic Location
U.S.
Publication Type
Article
Physical Holding
Alaska Medical Library
Keywords
Alaska
Carcinoma of the gallbladder
Carcinoma of the salivary gland
Carcinoma of the kidney
Ethnic Groups
Female
Humans
Indians, North American
Inuits
Male
Neoplasms - epidemiology
NPC
PHC
Abstract
Standard incidence ratios for cancers that occurred during 1969--73 among Alaskan Natives (Indians and Eskimo-Aleuts) were reported. Although data suggested that the overall rate of cancer in this population was close to that of U.S. whites, differences existed for certain cancer sites. Thus increased risks in Alaskan Natives were observed for nasopharyngeal, salivary gland, kidney, and gallbladder and liver cancers. Conversely, decreased risks were found for cancers of the lung, larynx, bladder, prostate gland, breast, and corpus uterus and for melanoma and lymphoma.
Notes
From: Fortuine, Robert et al. 1993. The Health of the Inuit of North America: A Bibliography from the Earliest Times through 1990. University of Alaska Anchorage. Citation number 2158.
PubMed ID
6933247 View in PubMed
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Cancer in Alaskan Indians, Eskimos, and Aleuts, 1969-83: implications for etiology and control.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature4158
Source
Public Health Reports. 1989 Nov-Dec;104(6):658-64
Publication Type
Article
Date
1989
Author
A P Lanier
L R Bulkow
B. Ireland
Author Affiliation
Arctic Investigations Laboratory, Center for Infectious Disease, Anchorage, AK 99501.
Source
Public Health Reports. 1989 Nov-Dec;104(6):658-64
Date
1989
Language
English
Geographic Location
U.S.
Publication Type
Article
Physical Holding
Alaska Medical Library
Keywords
Alaska - epidemiology
Breast Neoplasms - epidemiology - ethnology
Cervical Neoplasms - epidemiology - ethnology
Comparative Study
Esophageal Neoplasms - epidemiology - ethnology
Female
Gallbladder Neoplasms - epidemiology - ethnology
Humans
Incidence
Indians, North American
Inuits
Liver Neoplasms - epidemiology - ethnology
Lung Neoplasms - epidemiology - ethnology
Male
Nasopharyngeal Neoplasms - epidemiology - ethnology
Neoplasms - epidemiology - ethnology
NPC
PHC
Research Support, U.S. Gov't, P.H.S.
Risk
Salivary Gland Neoplasms - epidemiology - ethnology
Uterine Cervical Neoplasms - epidemiology - ethnology
Abstract
The authors collected and analyzed cancer incidence data for Alaska Natives (Indians, Eskimos, and Aleuts) for the 15-year period 1969-83 by ethnic and linguistic groups. Compared with U.S. whites, observed-to-expected ratios are high in more than one ethnic group for cancer of the nasopharynx, salivary gland, liver, gallbladder, and cervix. Low ratios were found for cancer of the breast, uterus, bladder, and melanoma. In Alaska, Eskimos have the highest risk for cancer of the esophagus and liver and the lowest risk for breast and prostate cancer. Risk for multiple myeloma in Indian men in Alaska exceeds not only those of other Native groups in Alaska but that in U.S. whites as well. Despite the short period studied, increases in cancer incidence over time can be documented for lung cancer in Eskimo men and women combined, and for cervical cancer, especially in Indian women.
Notes
From: Fortuine, Robert et al. 1993. The Health of the Inuit of North America: A Bibliography from the Earliest Times through 1990. University of Alaska Anchorage. Citation number 2156.
PubMed ID
2511602 View in PubMed
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Source
National Cancer Institute Monograph. 1982;62:79-81
Publication Type
Article
Date
1982
Author
A P Lanier
T R Bender
W J Blot
J F Fraumeni
Source
National Cancer Institute Monograph. 1982;62:79-81
Date
1982
Language
English
Geographic Location
U.S.
Publication Type
Article
Physical Holding
Alaska Medical Library
Keywords
Adult
Alaska
Carcinoma of the gallbladder
Carcinoma of the cervix
Carcinoma of the kidney
EBV
Female
HBV
Humans
Indians, North American
Inuits
Male
Middle Aged
Neoplasms - epidemiology
NPC
PHC
Abstract
Preliminary results of a cancer incidence survey among Alaskan Natives, 1974-78, indicated that patterns continue to differ from those of U.S. whites. Significantly high risks were found for cancers of the nasopharynx and liver in men, and cancers of the nasopharynx, gallbladder, cervix, and kidney in women. In men, significantly low risks were found for cancers of the prostate and bladder, leukemia, and lymphoma, and in women for cancers of the breast and uterus (excluding cervix), and lymphoma. Results are also given separately for Eskimo-Aleuts and Indians. Compared with Indians, Eskimo-Aleuts had higher risks for nasopharyngeal and liver cancers and lower risks for prostate and breast cancers.
Notes
From: Fortuine, Robert et al. 1993. The Health of the Inuit of North America: A Bibliography from the Earliest Times through 1990. University of Alaska Anchorage. Citation number 2159.
PubMed ID
7167198 View in PubMed
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Source
International Journal of Cancer. 1976 Oct 15;18(4):409-12
Publication Type
Article
Date
Oct-15-1976
Author
A P Lanier
T R Bender
W J Blot
J F Fraumeni
W B Hurlburt
Source
International Journal of Cancer. 1976 Oct 15;18(4):409-12
Date
Oct-15-1976
Language
English
Geographic Location
U.S.
Publication Type
Article
Physical Holding
Alaska Medical Library
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Aged
Alaska
Asian Continental Ancestry Group
Cervical Neoplasms - epidemiology
Child
Child, Preschool
Female
Gallbladder Neoplasms - epidemiology
Humans
Indians, North American
Infant
Inuits
Kidney Neoplasms - epidemiology
Liver Neoplasms - epidemiology
Lung Neoplasms - epidemiology
Male
Middle Aged
Nasopharyngeal Neoplasms - epidemiology
Neoplasms - epidemiology
NPC
PHC
Prostate Neoplasms - epidemiology
Salivary Gland Neoplasms - epidemiology
Sex Factors
Thyroid Neoplasms - epidemiology
United States
Abstract
A survey of cancer incidence among Alaska Natives for the 5-year period 1969-73 revealed fewer cancer cases overall than expected in relation to US rates, but significantly increased risk for certain cancer sites: the nasopharynx in both sexes (with excesses over 15-fold), the liver in males, and the salivary glands, gallbladder, kidney and thyroid in females. Compared with earlier reports, the observations suggest marked changes in cancer incidence among Alaska Natives over the past two decades, with declines in esophageal and invasive cervical cancers, and increases in cancers of the lung, colon and rectum.
Notes
From: Fortuine, Robert et al. 1993. The Health of the Inuit of North America: A Bibliography from the Earliest Times through 1990. University of Alaska Anchorage. Citation number 2157.
PubMed ID
977187 View in PubMed
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Cancer in Native populations in Labrador.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature2459
Source
Pages 283-289 in R.J. Shephard and S. Itoh, eds. Circumpolar Health. Proceedings of the International Symposium on Circumpolar Health, 3rd, Yellowknife, Northwest Territories, 1974.
Publication Type
Article
Date
1976
  1 document  
Author
Thomas, G.W.
Williams, J.H.
Author Affiliation
International Grenfell Association
Source
Pages 283-289 in R.J. Shephard and S. Itoh, eds. Circumpolar Health. Proceedings of the International Symposium on Circumpolar Health, 3rd, Yellowknife, Northwest Territories, 1974.
Date
1976
Language
English
Geographic Location
Canada
Publication Type
Article
Digital File Format
Text - PDF
Physical Holding
Alaska Medical Library
Keywords
Carcinoma of the stomach
Carcinoma of the colon and rectum
Carcinoma of the cervix
Carcinoma of the salivary gland
NPC
Osteosarcoma
Notes
From: Fortuine, Robert et al. 1993. The Health of the Inuit of North America: A Bibliography from the Earliest Times through 1990. University of Alaska Anchorage. Citation number 2167.
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Cancer mortality among Alaskan Natives, 1960-69.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature4285
Source
Journal of the National Cancer Institute. 1975 Sep;55(3):547-54
Publication Type
Article
Date
Sep-1975
Author
W J Blot
A Lanier
J F Fraumeni
T R Bender
Source
Journal of the National Cancer Institute. 1975 Sep;55(3):547-54
Date
Sep-1975
Language
English
Geographic Location
U.S.
Publication Type
Article
Physical Holding
Alaska Medical Library
Keywords
Adult
Aged
Alaska
Cancer registry
Cervical Neoplasms - mortality
Continental Population Groups
Esophageal Neoplasms - mortality
European Continental Ancestry Group
Female
Humans
Indians, North American
Inuits
Kidney Neoplasms - mortality
Lung Neoplasms - mortality
Male
Middle Aged
Nasopharyngeal Neoplasms - mortality
Neoplasms - mortality
NPC
Respiratory Tract Neoplasms - mortality
Salivary Gland Neoplasms - mortality
Uterine Cervical Neoplasms - mortality
Abstract
During 1960-69, 321 reported deaths among Alaskan natives (Eskimos, Indians, and Aleuts) were attributed to cancer. This number is not significantly different from the cancer mortality of U.S. Caucasians during this period, but is significantly higher than that of U.S. Indians. The mortality of Alaskan natives from cancers of the nasopharynx, esophagus, kidneys, and salivary glands was significantly increased. Among Alaskan Caucasians, only nasopharyngeal cancer was in excess in both sexes. Deficits in mortality among Alaskan Caucasians for cancers of other sites may be attributable, at least in part, to selection factors associated with the migration of healthy workers into the State.
Notes
From: Fortuine, Robert et al. 1993. The Health of the Inuit of North America: A Bibliography from the Earliest Times through 1990. University of Alaska Anchorage. Citation number 2148.
PubMed ID
1159833 View in PubMed
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Cancer patterns in the Inuit population of Canada 1970-1984.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature917
Source
Pages 443-446 in B.D. Postl et al., eds. Circumpolar Health 90. Proceedings of the International Congress on Circumpolar Health, 8th, Whitehorse, Yukon, May 20-25, 1990. Arctic Medical Research 1991; Suppl.
Publication Type
Article
Date
1991
. relatMly stable rates were also observed for naso- phacyngcal cancer (NPC) for both sexes. The dip in the rate among males in 1975 to l '179 may be attrib- uted, in part, to the under-registration which oc- curred in the Northwest Territories during this period. The NCPrate in womenappcan, if anything
  1 document  
Author
Gaudette, L.A.
Author Affiliation
Statistics Canada
Source
Pages 443-446 in B.D. Postl et al., eds. Circumpolar Health 90. Proceedings of the International Congress on Circumpolar Health, 8th, Whitehorse, Yukon, May 20-25, 1990. Arctic Medical Research 1991; Suppl.
Date
1991
Language
English
Geographic Location
Canada
Publication Type
Article
Digital File Format
Text - PDF
Physical Holding
Alaska Medical Library
Keywords
Carcinoma of the lung
Carcinoma of the colon and rectum
Carcinoma of the salivary gland
Carcinoma of the cervix
NPC
Abstract
1. Rates for lung cancer in Canadian Inuit are high and increasing for both men and women; in fact they are the highest reported rates for lung cancer among any Inuit population. 2. Cervical cancer in Canadian Inuit are high but rates appear to be stable, unlike the rapidly increasing trend reported in both Alaska and Greenland. 3. Rates for traditional Inuit cancers such as those of the nasopharynx and salivary gland do not appear to be declining in Canadian Inuit. 4. Rates for colorectal cancer in Canadian Inuit are similar to those expected for the Canadian population as a whole and do not appear to be increasing. 5. Finally, cancers traditionally reported to be rare in Inuit are still rare in the Canadian Inuit population; these include breast, prostate, bladder, and endometrial cancer. Cancer is a disease which can be controlled through prevention, early detection or treatment. The following future directions arising from this work reflect this paradigm...
Notes
From: Fortuine, Robert et al. 1993. The Health of the Inuit of North America: A Bibliography from the Earliest Times through 1990. University of Alaska Anchorage. Citation number 2153.
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30 records – page 1 of 3.