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[Humoral immunological aspects of the pathogenesis of rheumatism, nonrheumatic carditis and juvenile rheumatoid arthritis in children]

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature13978
Source
Lik Sprava. 2001 Sep-Dec;(5-6):48-52
Publication Type
Article
Author
P S Moshchych
A V Gaievs'ka
Iu V Marushko
O V Fedorich
T V Marushko
G M Bokhon'ko
Source
Lik Sprava. 2001 Sep-Dec;(5-6):48-52
Language
Ukrainian
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Antibody formation
Antigens, Bacterial - immunology
Arthritis, Juvenile Rheumatoid - immunology
Child
Complement System Proteins - analysis
English Abstract
Humans
Immunoglobulins - analysis
Myocarditis - immunology
Rheumatic Diseases - immunology
Streptococcus - immunology
Abstract
The state has been studied of the humoral component of immunological reactivity according to the content of the serumal complement, complement-bounding antibodies, immunoglobulins and immunoglobulin-antibodies of the main classes in the time-related course of rheumatism, nonrheumatic carditis and juvenile rheumatoid arthritis (JRA) in children. Tissue, enzymic, streptococcal antigens have been used together with those of nucleotides, nucleases. The obtained results suggest to us that the humoral component of bodily immunological reactivity has an important part in pathogenesis of the above medical conditions. It can be used in the diagnosis of affections of the heart.
PubMed ID
11881379 View in PubMed
Less detail

Identification and characterization of the antigen presenting cell in rat autoimmune myocarditis: evidence of bone marrow derivation and non-requirement for MHC class I compatibility with pathogenic T cells.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature54021
Source
J Autoimmun. 2000 Nov;15(3):369-79
Publication Type
Article
Date
Nov-2000
Author
N R Ratcliffe
K W Wegmann
R W Zhao
W F Hickey
Author Affiliation
Department of Pathology, Dartmouth Medical School, Dartmouth Hitchcock Medical Center, Lebanon, NH 03756, USA.
Source
J Autoimmun. 2000 Nov;15(3):369-79
Date
Nov-2000
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adoptive Transfer
Animals
Antigen Presentation - immunology
Antigen-Presenting Cells - immunology
Autoimmune Diseases - immunology - pathology
Bone Marrow - immunology
Histocompatibility Antigens Class I - immunology
Myocarditis - immunology - pathology
Myosins - immunology
Rats
Rats, Inbred BN
Rats, Inbred Lew
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Research Support, U.S. Gov't, P.H.S.
T-Lymphocytes - cytology - immunology
Abstract
In the rat, autoimmune myocarditis can be produced by the infusion of activated myosin peptide specific, CD4(+), class II restricted, effector T cells. Whether antigen presenting cells (APCs), which interact with these effector T cells in the heart, are a fixed population of cells (resident dendritic, macrophage, or endothelial cells), or a dynamic bone marrow derived population has not yet been demonstrated in vivo. To study this question, bone marrow chimeras were generated using inbred Brown Norway (BN) rats, which are resistant to autoimmune myocarditis, and transplanting them after lethal irradiation with (LewisxBN) F1 bone marrow. BN rats differ at both MHC loci from the susceptible inbred Lewis rats. Two months after bone marrow transplantation, chimeric animals received Lewis T cells specific for a myocarditogenic peptide antigen. To characterize the cardiac APCs, immunohistochemistry using a battery of antibodies including Lewis-specific and broadly reactive antibodies for both MHC class I and class II, was performed on chimeric hearts, with and without infused Lewis T cells, and non-transplanted BN control hearts.All chimeric rats infused with allogeneic (Lewis), anti-cardiac myosin peptide effector T cells displayed the lesions of myocarditis. Myocarditis was not present in non-transplanted BN controls given either Lewis or F1 derived myocarditogenic T cells, nor in chimeric animals which did not receive myocarditogenic T cells, thus excluding graft vs host disease as the explanation for the inflammation in chimeric hearts with myocarditis. Marrow derived cells expressing both Lewis class I and class II MHC molecules were demonstrated on perivascular cells in the myocardium of all chimeric animals, and on infiltrating cells in chimeric animals with myocarditis. Cells expressing Lewis-specific MHC antigens were not detected in the non-transplanted BN controls. Furthermore, immunohistochemistry using broadly reactive antibodies demonstrated MHC class II on perivascular cells with a dendritic morphology in all hearts but not on endothelial cells or cardiac myocytes. These results support the hypothesis that in vivo, cardiac APCs which result in MHC class II restricted, T cell induced myocarditis are a dynamic bone marrow derived population and not a fixed population.In order to address the potential requirement of MHC class I for the initiation of autoimmune myocarditis, myocarditogenic T cells derived from either Lewis or DA(RP) rats were infused into a member of the other strain. These strains share common MHC class II genes but differ at the MHC class I loci. Myocarditis identical to that produced in the syngeneic animal was successfully transferred by the MHC class I mismatched T cells, but only after the recipient animal's native immune system was mildly suppressed. These results further support the primary role for professional antigen presentation via MHC class II restriction to the effector T cells at the initiation of autoimmune myocarditis in the heart.Together, these experiments confirm that activated effector T cells, in order to produce myocarditis, require MHC class II compatible APCs in the heart, that these APCs are bone marrow derived, and will endogenously take up and present local antigens in the target organ after bone marrow reconstitution.
PubMed ID
11040077 View in PubMed
Less detail

Immune function in Swedish élite orienteers.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature53837
Source
Scand J Med Sci Sports. 2001 Oct;11(5):274-9
Publication Type
Article
Date
Oct-2001
Author
A. Lannergård
J. Fohlman
L. Wesslén
C. Rolf
G. Friman
Author Affiliation
Department of Medical Sciences, Section of Infectious Diseases, Uppsala University Hospital, Sweden.
Source
Scand J Med Sci Sports. 2001 Oct;11(5):274-9
Date
Oct-2001
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Cell Adhesion Molecules - blood
Chlamydia Infections - complications
Complement Activation
Death, Sudden, Cardiac - etiology
Female
Humans
Immunoglobulins - blood
Immunologic Factors - blood
Interleukins - blood
Lymphocyte Activation
Lymphocyte Subsets
Male
Monitoring, Immunologic
Myocarditis - immunology - microbiology
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Running
Skiing
Sweden
T-Lymphocytes - immunology
Tumor Necrosis Factor-alpha - metabolism
Abstract
During 1979-1992 an increased frequency of sudden unexpected cardiac death (SUD) occurred among young male Swedish élite orienteers. Subacute-to-chronic myocarditis was found in 12/16 (75%) at autopsy and Chlamydia pneumoniae, or a cross-reacting agent, was suspected on the basis of diagnostic tests performed. Because myocarditis is an infrequent cause of SUD and clusters of SUD are rare, whereas Chlamydia pneumoniae infections are ubiquitous and seldom cause severe myocarditis, 119 top ranked élite orienteers (67 males and 52 females) and 36 highly trained male middle-distance runners and cross-country skiers, serving as controls, underwent immunologic screening in an effort to reveal possible immune dysfunction. Except for two orienteers and one runner/skier who showed genetic C3-deficiency or IgA-deficiency, the results showed no significant differences between the orienteers and controls with respect to immunoglobulin levels, complement activation, lymphocyte subsets, including activated T lymphocytes, and sIL-2r-alpha. IL-1 beta, IL-6, TNF-alpha, and sCD8, tested in the orienteers only, were normal. However, IFN-gamma was significantly higher in controls than in orienteers, who showed normal levels, whereas the orienteers had increased sELAM-1 and sICAM-1 levels. Finally, sIL-2 receptor-alpha was similarly elevated in orienteers and controls. We conclude that, with the tests employed, no immunologic disturbance could be revealed in the orienteers that may potentially have increased their susceptibility to myocarditis and SUD.
Notes
Comment In: Scand J Med Sci Sports. 2001 Oct;11(5):25911696208
PubMed ID
11696211 View in PubMed
Less detail

Serologic surveys of arctic populations and some virus diseases of interest

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature2563
Source
Papers presented at the Symposium on Circumpolar Health Related Problems, Fairbanks, Alaska, July 23-28, 1967. Archives of Environmental Health. 17(4):547-554
Publication Type
Article
Date
Oct-1968
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6 records – page 1 of 1.