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Ambient temperature during gestation and cold-related adult mortality in a Swedish cohort, 1915-2002.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature265273
Source
Soc Sci Med. 2014 Oct;119:191-7
Publication Type
Article
Date
Oct-2014
Author
Tim A Bruckner
Gerard J van den Berg
Kirk R Smith
Ralph A Catalano
Source
Soc Sci Med. 2014 Oct;119:191-7
Date
Oct-2014
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Birth weight
Cohort Studies
Cold Temperature
Fetal Development
Gestational Age
Humans
Hypothermia - complications
Myocardial Ischemia - etiology - mortality
Proportional Hazards Models
Seasons
Stroke - etiology - mortality
Sweden - epidemiology
Abstract
For all climatic regions, mortality due to cold exceeds mortality due to heat. A separate line of research indicates that season of birth predicts lifespan after age 50. This and other literature implies the hypothesis that ambient temperature during gestation may influence cold-related adult mortality. We use data on over 13,500 Swedes from the Uppsala Birth Cohort Study to test whether cold-related mortality in adulthood varies positively with unusually benign ambient temperature during gestation. We linked daily thermometer temperatures in Uppsala, Sweden (1915-2002) to subjects beginning at their estimated date of conception and ending at death or the end of follow-up. We specified a Cox proportional hazards model with time-dependent covariates to analyze the two leading causes of cold-related death in adulthood: ischemic heart disease (IHD) and stroke. Over 540,450 person-years, 1313 IHD and 406 stroke deaths occurred. For a one standard deviation increase in our measure of warm temperatures during gestation, we observe an increased hazard ratio of 1.16 for cold-related IHD death (95% confidence interval: 1.03-1.29). We, however, observe no relation for cold-related stroke mortality. Additional analyses show that birthweight percentile and/or gestational age do not mediate discovered findings. The IHD results indicate that ambient temperature during gestation--independent of birth month--modifies the relation between cold and adult mortality. We encourage longitudinal studies of the adult sequelae of ambient temperature during gestation among populations not sufficiently sheltered from heat or cold waves.
PubMed ID
24593929 View in PubMed
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Is the effect of low birth weight on cardiovascular mortality mediated through high blood pressure?

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature52974
Source
J Hypertens. 1999 Jan;17(1):19-25
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jan-1999
Author
I. Koupilová
D A Leon
P M McKeigue
H O Lithell
Author Affiliation
Department of Epidemiology and Population Health, London School of Hygiene and Tropical Medicine, UK. i.koupilova@lshtm.ac.uk
Source
J Hypertens. 1999 Jan;17(1):19-25
Date
Jan-1999
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aged
Birth weight
Blood pressure
Body mass index
Cause of Death
Cerebrovascular Disorders - etiology - mortality
Comparative Study
Follow-Up Studies
Humans
Infant, Low Birth Weight
Infant, Newborn
Male
Middle Aged
Myocardial Ischemia - etiology - mortality
Population Surveillance
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Retrospective Studies
Survival Rate
Sweden - epidemiology
Abstract
OBJECTIVE: To explore whether the inverse association between birth weight and mortality from circulatory diseases is mediated through blood pressure in men aged 50-75 years. DESIGN: Cohort study with retrospectively collected data on size at birth. SUBJECTS AND SETTING: The study included 1334 men born during 1920-1924, living in Uppsala, Sweden, who were examined at the ages of 50 and 60 years, and followed-up to the end of 1995. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES: Mortality from circulatory diseases based on routine death registration. RESULTS: Birth weight showed a specific, inverse association with mortality from circulatory diseases: the rate ratio was 0.67 (95% confidence interval 0.50 to 0.89) per 1000 g increase in birth weight. This association was not appreciably affected by adjustment for sociodemographic characteristics or smoking, but was strengthened slightly by adjustment for body mass index at the ages of 50 and 60 years. Adjustment for systolic blood pressure at the age of 50 years only slightly reduced the strength of the inverse association between birth weight and mortality from ischaemic heart disease, and did not affect the inverse association between birth weight and mortality from stroke. Adjustments for systolic and diastolic blood pressure and hypertension treatment at the ages of 50 and 60 years did not reduce the strength of the association between birth weight and mortality from circulatory diseases at the age of 60-75 years. CONCLUSIONS: The inverse association between birth weight and mortality from circulatory diseases in men aged 50-75 years is independent of adult sociodemographic characteristics, smoking and adult obesity and does not seem to be mediated through an increased blood pressure in those with low birth weight.
PubMed ID
10100089 View in PubMed
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[The child is the father of the man also among men born in 1913. New discoveries on fetal factors and adult diseases]

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature54882
Source
Lakartidningen. 1994 Jun 15;91(24):2427-9
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-15-1994