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33 records – page 1 of 4.

Ambient temperature during gestation and cold-related adult mortality in a Swedish cohort, 1915-2002.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature265273
Source
Soc Sci Med. 2014 Oct;119:191-7
Publication Type
Article
Date
Oct-2014
Author
Tim A Bruckner
Gerard J van den Berg
Kirk R Smith
Ralph A Catalano
Source
Soc Sci Med. 2014 Oct;119:191-7
Date
Oct-2014
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Birth weight
Cohort Studies
Cold Temperature
Fetal Development
Gestational Age
Humans
Hypothermia - complications
Myocardial Ischemia - etiology - mortality
Proportional Hazards Models
Seasons
Stroke - etiology - mortality
Sweden - epidemiology
Abstract
For all climatic regions, mortality due to cold exceeds mortality due to heat. A separate line of research indicates that season of birth predicts lifespan after age 50. This and other literature implies the hypothesis that ambient temperature during gestation may influence cold-related adult mortality. We use data on over 13,500 Swedes from the Uppsala Birth Cohort Study to test whether cold-related mortality in adulthood varies positively with unusually benign ambient temperature during gestation. We linked daily thermometer temperatures in Uppsala, Sweden (1915-2002) to subjects beginning at their estimated date of conception and ending at death or the end of follow-up. We specified a Cox proportional hazards model with time-dependent covariates to analyze the two leading causes of cold-related death in adulthood: ischemic heart disease (IHD) and stroke. Over 540,450 person-years, 1313 IHD and 406 stroke deaths occurred. For a one standard deviation increase in our measure of warm temperatures during gestation, we observe an increased hazard ratio of 1.16 for cold-related IHD death (95% confidence interval: 1.03-1.29). We, however, observe no relation for cold-related stroke mortality. Additional analyses show that birthweight percentile and/or gestational age do not mediate discovered findings. The IHD results indicate that ambient temperature during gestation--independent of birth month--modifies the relation between cold and adult mortality. We encourage longitudinal studies of the adult sequelae of ambient temperature during gestation among populations not sufficiently sheltered from heat or cold waves.
PubMed ID
24593929 View in PubMed
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[A quantitative assessment of the impact of diet on the mortality of heart disease in Denmark. Estimation of etiologic fraction]

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature10365
Source
Ugeskr Laeger. 2000 Sep 11;162(37):4921-5
Publication Type
Article
Date
Sep-11-2000
Author
M. Osler
J. Godtfredsen
M N Grønbaek
P. Marckmann
O K Overvad
Author Affiliation
Københavns Universitet, Panum Instituttet, afdeling for social medicin og psykosocial sundhed (Institut for Folkesundhedsvidenskab).
Source
Ugeskr Laeger. 2000 Sep 11;162(37):4921-5
Date
Sep-11-2000
Language
Danish
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Alcohol Drinking
Coronary Disease - etiology - mortality
Denmark - epidemiology
Dietary Fats - administration & dosage
English Abstract
Food Habits
Fruit
Guidelines
Humans
Myocardial Ischemia - etiology - mortality
Risk assessment
Risk factors
Vegetables
Abstract
INTRODUCTION: The aim of the present study was to quantify the impact of different dietary factors on the mortality from ischaemic heart disease in Denmark. METHODS: Relative risks and knowledge on the distribution of different dietary factors were used to estimate etiological fractions. RESULTS: It is estimated that an intake of fruit and vegetables and saturated fat as recommended would prevent 12 and 22%, respectively, of deaths from ischaemic heart disease in Denmark. An intake of fish among those at high risk for ischaemic heart disease, would lead to a 26% lower mortality, while alcohol intake among abstainers would have no significant quantitative effect. DISCUSSION: These results suggest that changes in dietary habits according to current recommendations would have an impact on public health in Denmark.
PubMed ID
11002740 View in PubMed
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Binge drinking, drinking frequency, and risk of ischaemic heart disease: a population-based cohort study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature130333
Source
Scand J Public Health. 2011 Dec;39(8):880-7
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-2011
Author
Lise Skrubbeltrang Skov-Ettrup
Marie Eliasen
Ola Ekholm
Morten Grønbæk
Janne Schurmann Tolstrup
Author Affiliation
National Institute of Public Health, University of Southern Denmark, Øster Farimagsgade 5a, Copenhagen, Denmark. lse@niph.dk
Source
Scand J Public Health. 2011 Dec;39(8):880-7
Date
Dec-2011
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Aged
Alcohol Drinking - adverse effects
Cohort Studies
Denmark - epidemiology
Female
Follow-Up Studies
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Myocardial Ischemia - etiology - mortality
Prospective Studies
Risk factors
Young Adult
Abstract
Light-to-moderate alcohol drinking is associated with a decreased risk of ischaemic heart disease (IHD). However, drinking heavily and in binges has been suggested to increase IHD risk. This complexity makes the issue of binge drinking within the light-to-moderate alcohol range an important area for further investigation.
This population-based cohort study included 26,786 men and women who participated in the Danish National Cohort Study in 1994, 2000, and 2005. Binge drinking (defined >5 drinks/day) and risk of IHD and all-cause mortality was investigated among light-to-moderate drinkers (defined =21 and =14 drinks/week for men and women, respectively). In the entire study population, we investigated the association between drinking frequency, separately and combined with total weekly alcohol intake, and risk of IHD and all-cause mortality.
1136 individuals developed IHD during a mean follow up of 6.9 years. Among male light-to-moderate drinkers reporting occasional binge drinking, the hazard ratio (HR) of IHD was 0.81 (95% CI 0.61-1.08) compared to male light-to-moderate drinkers reporting no binge drinking. Corresponding HR for women was 0.97 (95% CI 0.54-1.76). For women drinking 5-6 days/week, the risk of IHD was lower than for women drinking 1-2 days/week (HR 0.54, 95% CI 0.32-0.90). We did not observe any patterns when looking at combinations of total weekly alcohol intake and drinking frequency.
Among light-to-moderate alcohol drinkers, binge drinking was not associated with risk of IHD and all-cause mortality. Overall, drinking frequency did not appear to be an important determinant of the risk of IHD and all-cause mortality.
PubMed ID
22013157 View in PubMed
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Decline in ischemic heart disease mortality.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature190893
Source
Can J Cardiol. 2002 Mar;18(3):246-7
Publication Type
Article
Date
Mar-2002
Author
H F Mitzgala
Source
Can J Cardiol. 2002 Mar;18(3):246-7
Date
Mar-2002
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Evidence-Based Medicine
Humans
Myocardial Ischemia - etiology - mortality
Ontario - epidemiology
Risk factors
United States - epidemiology
Notes
Comment On: Can J Cardiol. 2000 May;16(5):596-60310833539
PubMed ID
11907609 View in PubMed
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Fluctuations in male ischaemic heart disease mortality in Russia 1959-1998: assessing the importance of alcohol.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature149721
Source
Drug Alcohol Rev. 2009 Jul;28(4):390-5
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jul-2009
Author
Mats Ramstedt
Author Affiliation
Centre for Social Research on Alcohol and Drugs, Stockholm University, Stockholm, Sweden. mats.ramstedt@sorad.su.se
Source
Drug Alcohol Rev. 2009 Jul;28(4):390-5
Date
Jul-2009
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Age Factors
Alcohol Drinking - adverse effects - trends
Alcoholism - complications - epidemiology
Humans
Liver Cirrhosis - etiology - mortality
Lung Neoplasms - etiology - mortality
Male
Middle Aged
Models, Statistical
Multivariate Analysis
Myocardial Ischemia - etiology - mortality
Regression Analysis
Russia - epidemiology
Smoking - epidemiology
Time Factors
Abstract
The decline in cardiovascular mortality in Russia following the Soviet anti-alcohol campaign of 1985-1988 and the subsequent increase when these extreme alcohol controls were repealed suggested that alcohol consumption is responsible for a substantial number of ischaemic heart disease (IHD) deaths in Russia. To examine whether a similar conclusion can be drawn on the basis of a time-series analysis covering a longer time period, namely 1959-1998.
Using ARIMA time-series analysis, the male IHD mortality rates from 1959 to 1998 were analysed in relation to three indicators of alcohol consumption: estimated per capita consumption, mortality from liver cirrhosis and alcohol poisonings. Cigarette sales and lung cancer mortality were used as indicators of smoking.
Each indicator of alcohol consumption had positive and statistically significant relationships with male IHD mortality in bivariate autoregressive integrated moving average models. The association was stronger in models predicting changes in premature male IHD mortality (30-54 years). At least one alcohol indicator was significantly related to IHD mortality in multivariate models, and in the case of premature IHD mortality, both mortality indicators were significant.
The results provide additional empirical evidence supporting alcohol's conceivable negative effects on IHD in Russia and the idea that binge drinking could be the mechanism through which this effect is mediated. There were no signs of any protective effects from alcohol among Russian men.
PubMed ID
19594793 View in PubMed
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Health consequences of smoking 1-4 cigarettes per day.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature16732
Source
Tob Control. 2005 Oct;14(5):315-20
Publication Type
Article
Date
Oct-2005
Author
K. Bjartveit
A. Tverdal
Author Affiliation
National Health Screening Service, Oslo, Norway. kjell.bjartveit@chello.no
Source
Tob Control. 2005 Oct;14(5):315-20
Date
Oct-2005
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Confidence Intervals
Female
Humans
Lung Neoplasms - etiology - mortality
Male
Middle Aged
Myocardial Ischemia - etiology - mortality
Neoplasms - etiology - mortality
Norway - epidemiology
Prospective Studies
Risk assessment
Sex Factors
Smoking - adverse effects - mortality
Abstract
OBJECTIVES: To determine the risk in men and women smoking 1-4 cigarettes per day of dying from specified smoking related diseases and from any cause. DESIGN: Prospective study. SETTING: Oslo city and three counties in Norway. PARTICIPANTS: 23,521 men and 19,201 women, aged 35-49 years, screened for cardiovascular disease risk factors in the mid 1970s and followed throughout 2002. OUTCOMES: Absolute mortality and relative risks adjusted for confounding variables, of dying from ischaemic heart disease, all cancer, lung cancer, and from all causes. RESULTS: Adjusted relative risk (95% confidence interval) in smokers of 1-4 cigarettes per day, with never smokers as reference, of dying from ischaemic heart disease was 2.74 (2.07 to 3.61) in men and 2.94 (1.75 to 4.95) in women. The corresponding figures for all cancer were 1.08 (0.78 to 1.49) and 1.14 (0.84 to 1.55), for lung cancer 2.79 (0.94 to 8.28) and 5.03 (1.81 to 13.98), and for any cause 1.57 (1.33 to 1.85) and 1.47 (1.19 to 1.82). CONCLUSIONS: In both sexes, smoking 1-4 cigarettes per day was associated with a significantly higher risk of dying from ischaemic heart disease and from all causes, and from lung cancer in women. Smoking control policymakers and health educators should emphasise more strongly that light smokers also endanger their health.
Notes
Comment In: Tob Control. 2005 Oct;14(5):294-516183973
PubMed ID
16183982 View in PubMed
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Health survey of former workers in a Norwegian coke plant: Part 2. Cancer incidence and cause specific mortality.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature21323
Source
Occup Environ Med. 1998 Sep;55(9):622-6
Publication Type
Article
Date
Sep-1998
Author
T. Bye
P R Romundstad
A. Rønneberg
B. Hilt
Author Affiliation
Department of Occupational Medicine, University Hospital of Trondheim, Norway.
Source
Occup Environ Med. 1998 Sep;55(9):622-6
Date
Sep-1998
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Carbon Monoxide - adverse effects
Cause of Death
Coke
Health Surveys
Humans
Hydrocarbons, Aromatic - adverse effects
Incidence
Male
Myocardial Ischemia - etiology - mortality
Neoplasms - epidemiology - etiology
Norway - epidemiology
Occupational Diseases - epidemiology - etiology
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Stomach Neoplasms - epidemiology - etiology
Abstract
OBJECTIVES: A Norwegian coke plant that operated from 1964 to 1988 was investigated to ascertain whether the male workers in this plant had increased morbidities of cancer or increased mortality from specific causes, particularly associated with specific exposures at the coke plant. METHODS: Personal data on all the employees of the plant were obtained from the plant's archives. With additional data from the Norwegian Bureau of Statistics we identified 888 male former workers at the plant. Causes of death were obtained from the Norwegian Bureau of Statistics, and cancer diagnoses from the Norwegian Cancer Registry. The results were compared with national averages adjusted for age. Specific exposures were estimated with records of actual measurements done at the plant and interviews with former workers at the plant. RESULTS: A significant excess of stomach cancer (standardised incidence ratio (SIR) 2.22, 95% confidence interval (95% CI) 1.01 to 4.21) was found. Mortality from ischaemic heart disease and sudden death was positively associated with work in areas which entailed peak exposures to CO. When considering work in such areas the past 3 years before death, the association was significant (p = 0.01). The last result is based on only two deaths. CONCLUSIONS: Considering the short follow up time and the small size of the cohort the results should be interpreted with a certain caution. The positive results would justify a re-examination of the cohort at a later date.
PubMed ID
9861185 View in PubMed
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The importance of lung function, non-malignant diseases associated with asbestos, and symptoms as predictors of ischaemic heart disease in shipyard workers exposed to asbestos.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature54985
Source
Br J Ind Med. 1993 Sep;50(9):785-90
Publication Type
Article
Date
Sep-1993
Author
A. Sandén
B. Järvholm
S. Larsson
Author Affiliation
Department of Occupational Medicine, Sahlgrenska Hospital, Göteborg, Sweden.
Source
Br J Ind Med. 1993 Sep;50(9):785-90
Date
Sep-1993
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Asbestos - adverse effects
Asbestosis - complications
Follow-Up Studies
Humans
Lung - physiopathology
Lung Diseases - complications
Male
Myocardial Ischemia - etiology - mortality
Occupational Diseases - etiology - mortality
Occupational Exposure - adverse effects
Pleural Diseases - complications
Prospective Studies
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Risk factors
Sweden - epidemiology
Abstract
The mortality from ischaemic heart disease was studied in a prospective cohort of 1725 shipyard workers exposed to asbestos. The analyses were stratified for age and smoking habits and restricted to men. In agreement with other findings, men with impaired lung function had a significantly higher risk (relative risk (RR) = 3.5) of dying from ischaemic heart disease than men with normal lung function. Men with asbestosis or suspected asbestosis had a significantly higher risk (RR = 3.1) of dying from ischaemic heart disease than men without asbestosis. Thus asbestosis or suspected asbestosis also seemed to be a risk factor for ischaemic heart disease. This finding was independent of respiratory function. There was no increased risk for ischaemic heart disease in men with compared with men without pleural plaques. Men with production of phlegm or sputum and wheezing or whistling had no increased risk for ischaemic heart disease compared with men without these symptoms. In the group with normal lung function men with dyspnoea had a significantly higher risk of dying from ischaemic heart disease than men without dyspnoea. The findings for men with asbestosis or suspected asbestosis indicated a further risk factor besides impaired lung function, in persons exposed to asbestos. Perhaps this risk factor is due to lesions of the pericardium with consequences for heart function.
PubMed ID
8398871 View in PubMed
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33 records – page 1 of 4.