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Changes in health beliefs after labelling with hypercholesterolaemia.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature53759
Source
Scand J Public Health. 2002;30(1):76-9
Publication Type
Article
Date
2002
Author
Margareta Troein
Lennart Råstam
Staffan Selander
Author Affiliation
Department of Community Medicine, Lund University, Malmö, Sweden. margareta.troein@smi.mas.lu.se
Source
Scand J Public Health. 2002;30(1):76-9
Date
2002
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Attitude to Health
Case-Control Studies
Health Status Indicators
Humans
Hypercholesterolemia - complications - diagnosis - psychology
Male
Middle Aged
Myocardial Ischemia - epidemiology - etiology
Patient compliance
Questionnaires
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Risk assessment
Risk factors
Sweden - epidemiology
Abstract
BACKGROUND: Patients' health beliefs influence their willingness to comply with medical advice. In an earlier study, it was found that men with a previous history of information on risk factors for ischaemic heart disease expressed more feelings of threat to their health than did men without this experience. As anxiety may have adverse effects, such as making patients avoid the desired action, this could complicate adequate patient treatment. AIMS: To investigate the impact on health beliefs caused by participation in a screening programme for risk factors for ischaemic heart disease, including individualized information to patients with hypercholesterolaemia. METHODS: A random sample of middle-aged, urban men participating in a health screening completed a questionnaire on socioeconomic factors, medical history, lifestyle, and health beliefs. Blood pressures and plasma cholesterol values were measured. Four months after the initial screening, hypercholesterolaemic men and controls completed the questionnaire again. RESULTS: In a univariate analysis, no differences in health belief indices were found between cases and controls at the baseline screening. Controls achieved lower values of the indices "perceived control over illness" and "medical motivation" at follow-up. In a matched case-control design, the differences in "medical motivation" increased between cases and controls because controls reported lower values. "Perceived threat to health" did not change, and it is suggested that this is due to the supportive information to the patients. CONCLUSION: Individualized and supportive patient information on risk factors for cardiovascular disease does not increase patients' perceptions of threat.
PubMed ID
11928837 View in PubMed
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Factors predictive of ischemic heart disease mortality in foundry workers exposed to carbon monoxide.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature196947
Source
Am J Epidemiol. 2000 Oct 1;152(7):628-32
Publication Type
Article
Date
Oct-1-2000
Author
R S Koskela
P. Mutanen
J A Sorsa
M. Klockars
Author Affiliation
Finnish Institute of Occupational Health, Helsinki. riitta-sisko.koskela@occuphealth.fi
Source
Am J Epidemiol. 2000 Oct 1;152(7):628-32
Date
Oct-1-2000
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Air Pollutants, Occupational - analysis
Blood pressure
Carbon Monoxide - adverse effects - analysis
Confounding Factors (Epidemiology)
Electrocardiography
Finland - epidemiology
Follow-Up Studies
Humans
Hypertension - complications
Male
Metallurgy
Myocardial Ischemia - epidemiology - etiology - mortality
Occupational Exposure - adverse effects - standards
Proportional Hazards Models
Questionnaires
Registries
Smoking - adverse effects
Abstract
The potential predictors of ischemic heart disease mortality were studied for 931 male foundry workers in Finland who participated in a health examination in 1973. These workers were followed up to 1993 through registers and by using a questionnaire. In 1973, the systolic and diastolic blood pressures of workers exposed to carbon monoxide (CO) were slightly higher than those of unexposed workers. The prevalence of angina pectoris showed a clear dose-response relation to CO exposure. Electrocardiogram (ECG) findings indicating past myocardial infarction or suggesting coronary artery disease as a function of smoking and/or CO exposure were not evident. In the 1987 follow-up, the rate ratio for ischemic heart disease mortality was estimated as 4.4 for CO-exposed smokers compared with unexposed nonsmokers. Ischemic heart disease mortality in 1973-1993 was analyzed by using the Cox proportional hazards model. The statistically significant predictors were age, pathologic ECG findings in 1973, regular CO exposure, and abundant alcohol drinking. Of the ECG findings, changes in Q or QS and ST-J or ST waves and in ventricular extrasystoles were statistically significant. The risk of mortality from ischemic heart disease was increased by working in iron foundries, by hypertension, and by smoking.
PubMed ID
11032157 View in PubMed
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Major life events and the risk of ischaemic heart disease: does accumulation increase the risk?

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature135849
Source
Int J Epidemiol. 2011 Aug;40(4):904-13
Publication Type
Article
Date
Aug-2011
Author
Ingelise Andersen
Finn Diderichsen
Henriette Kornerup
Eva Prescott
Naja Hulvej Rod
Author Affiliation
Department of Social Medicine, Institute of Public Health, University of Copenhagen, Copenhagen, Denmark. inan@sund.ku.dk
Source
Int J Epidemiol. 2011 Aug;40(4):904-13
Date
Aug-2011
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Denmark - epidemiology
Depression - drug therapy
Humans
Life Change Events
Longitudinal Studies
Male
Middle Aged
Myocardial Ischemia - epidemiology - etiology
Proportional Hazards Models
Questionnaires
Risk factors
Stress, Psychological - epidemiology
Tranquilizing Agents - therapeutic use
Young Adult
Abstract
Stress is a consequence of different types of external demands, most of which have been shown to be associated with increased risk of ischaemic heart disease (IHD), but whether accumulation of stressors over a life-course results in additional risk of IHD remains unknown. This study investigates the impact of major life events (MLE) in childhood, adulthood and at work, singly and accumulated, on incident IHD in men and women and examines vital exhaustion (VE) and use of tranquillizers as potential mediators. Material and methods The study includes 8738 participants, 57% women, from the third wave of the Copenhagen City Heart Study, who in 1991-93 answered a range of questions on MLE, VE and use of tranquillizers. The participants were followed in a nationwide hospital discharge register until 2007.
During follow-up, 653 experienced a first-time incident of IHD. In general, there were no associations between MLE and incidence of IHD. However, being placed in care during childhood was associated with a higher risk of IHD among women [hazard ratio (HR) = 1.36; 95% confidence interval (95% CI) 0.97-1.89], but a lower risk of IHD among men (HR = 0.72; 95% CI 0.51-1.03). MLE showed a dose-response association with psychological risk factors with highest estimates for those exposed to MLE in all three life domains: VE [odds ratio (OR)?=?15.07; 95% CI 8.97-25.31] and use of tranquillizers (OR = 4.41; 95% CI 3.10-6.26).
This prospective study finds no associations between accumulated MLE and IHD. MLE is, however, strongly associated with VE and use of tranquillizers. The results underscore the problems in conceptualizing and measuring MLE.
PubMed ID
21441553 View in PubMed
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Psychological job demands increase the risk of ischaemic heart disease: a 14-year cohort study of employed Danish men.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature80981
Source
Eur J Cardiovasc Prev Rehabil. 2006 Jun;13(3):414-20
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-2006
Author
Netterstrøm Bo
Kristensen Tage S
Sjøl Anette
Author Affiliation
Clinic of Occupational Medicine, Hillerød Hospital, Helsevej 2, 3400 Hillerød, Denmark. bone@fa.dk
Source
Eur J Cardiovasc Prev Rehabil. 2006 Jun;13(3):414-20
Date
Jun-2006
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Denmark - epidemiology
Employment - psychology
Follow-Up Studies
Humans
Job Satisfaction
Male
Middle Aged
Myocardial Ischemia - epidemiology - etiology - psychology
Occupational Diseases - epidemiology - psychology
Proportional Hazards Models
Questionnaires
Risk factors
Stress, Psychological - complications
Abstract
AIMS: To test the relationship between job strain and the incidence of ischaemic heart disease (IHD) prospectively in the Danish working population. METHODS AND RESULTS: In 1986, a clinical examination was undertaken of 659 men, all employed and without known IHD, together with a questionnaire-based evaluation of living conditions and psychosocial factors at work, including items identified in the job strain model. This study was part of the World Health Organization-initiated MONICA II study. In the job strain model, job strain is defined as the combination of high psychological demands and a low degree of control in the work situation. An objective classification of the components in the job strain model was made by imputation by utilizing the participants' job title and the principles guiding the payment of their salaries/wages. In addition, a questionnaire-based subjective classification was undertaken. All participants were followed until the end of 1999 with regard to hospitalization and death as a result of IHD. Stepwise analyses were made, adjusting for age, social class, social network and established behavioural and physiological coronary risk factors. Self-reported job strain was significantly associated with IHD independently of standard coronary risk factors. Of the two components in the job strain model only high demands contributed significantly to this result. The study did not support the job strain hypothesis when an imputed, objective classification of the components in the job strain model was applied. This is in accordance with the majority of other studies in this area. An unexpected finding was that the incidence of IHD was highest among employers and managers. CONCLUSION: High psychological demands at work are a risk factor for IHD, a fact that should affect the primary and secondary prevention of IHD.
PubMed ID
16926672 View in PubMed
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Psychosocial work environment and risk of ischaemic heart disease in women: the Danish Nurse Cohort Study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature143722
Source
Occup Environ Med. 2010 May;67(5):318-22
Publication Type
Article
Date
May-2010
Author
Karen Allesøe
Yrsa Andersen Hundrup
Jane Frølund Thomsen
Merete Osler
Author Affiliation
Research Centre for Prevention and Health, Glostrup University Hospital, Building 84/85, Ndr. Ringvej 57, Glostrup 2600, Denmark.
Source
Occup Environ Med. 2010 May;67(5):318-22
Date
May-2010
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Age Factors
Cohort Studies
Denmark - epidemiology
Female
Humans
Incidence
Middle Aged
Myocardial Ischemia - epidemiology - etiology - psychology
Nursing Staff - psychology
Occupational Diseases - epidemiology - psychology
Prospective Studies
Questionnaires
Risk factors
Stress, Psychological - epidemiology - psychology
Workplace
Abstract
To investigate the effect of work pressure and job influence on the development of ischaemic heart disease (IHD) in women.
The effect of work pressure and job influence on the 15-year incidence of IHD in women participating in the Danish Nurse Cohort Study was prospectively studied. A total of 12 116 participants, aged 45-64 years, were examined in 1993 using a questionnaire and were followed by individual linkage in the National Register of Hospital Discharges to the beginning of 2008. Work pressure, job influence, occupational characteristics, demographic factors and known biological and behavioural risk factors for IHD were collected at baseline.
During follow-up, 580 participants were hospitalised with IHD. In the fully adjusted model, nurses who reported work pressure to be much too high had a 1.4-fold increased risk of incident IHD (95% CI 1.04 to 1.81) compared with nurses who reported work pressure to be suitable. A tendency towards a dose-response effect was found. Age-stratified analysis showed that this effect was significant only among the younger nurses (
Notes
Comment In: Occup Environ Med. 2010 May;67(5):291-220447986
PubMed ID
20447987 View in PubMed
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[Risk of cardiovascular complications in patients with frequent hypertensive crises].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature147971
Source
Ter Arkh. 2009;81(9):9-12
Publication Type
Article
Date
2009
Author
I P Kolos
I E Chazova
S N Tereshchenko
S N Nakonechnikov
Source
Ter Arkh. 2009;81(9):9-12
Date
2009
Language
Russian
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aged
Case-Control Studies
Chronic Disease
Female
Humans
Hypertension - complications
Hypertrophy, Left Ventricular - epidemiology - etiology
Male
Middle Aged
Myocardial Infarction - epidemiology - etiology
Myocardial Ischemia - epidemiology - etiology
Questionnaires
Retrospective Studies
Risk factors
Russia - epidemiology
Abstract
To investigate a relative risk of cardiovascular complications in uncomplicated hypertensive crises (UHC) in hypertensive patients.
A questionnaire retrospective case-control study covered one-third of patients registered in the data base of a hospital or outpatient clinic. The patients were matched by basic characteristics. By frequency of UHC the patients were divided into two groups. Group 1 (n = 305) comprised patients with frequent (weekly or more often) UHC, group 2 (n = 558) consisted of patients with rare UHC (monthly or less frequent).
Patients of group 1 had a longer history of arterial hypertension (13 +/- 9 years vs 9 +/- 7.8 years, p 0.05).
Frequent UHC raise the risk of non-fatal acute disorder of cerebral circulation, chronic cardiac failure, ischemia and left ventricular hypertrophy. Frequency of UHC is not related to the risk of myocardial infarction.
PubMed ID
19827644 View in PubMed
Less detail
Source
Ugeskr Laeger. 2004 Apr 5;166(15-16):1444-8
Publication Type
Article
Date
Apr-5-2004

7 records – page 1 of 1.