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Nationwide cohort study of risk of ischemic heart disease in patients with celiac disease.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature137641
Source
Circulation. 2011 Feb 8;123(5):483-90
Publication Type
Article
Date
Feb-8-2011
Author
Jonas F Ludvigsson
Stefan James
Johan Askling
Ulf Stenestrand
Erik Ingelsson
Author Affiliation
Department of Pediatrics, Örebro University Hospital, Örebro, Sweden. jonasludvigsson@yahoo.com
Source
Circulation. 2011 Feb 8;123(5):483-90
Date
Feb-8-2011
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Age Distribution
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Celiac Disease - complications - epidemiology - pathology
Child
Child, Preschool
Cohort Studies
Female
Humans
Infant
Infant, Newborn
Inflammation
Male
Middle Aged
Morbidity
Myocardial Ischemia - epidemiology - etiology - mortality - pathology
Risk
Sweden - epidemiology
Young Adult
Abstract
Studies on ischemic heart disease (IHD) incidence in individuals with celiac disease (CD) are contradictory and do not take small intestinal pathology into account.
In this Swedish population-based cohort study, we examined the risk of IHD in patients with CD based on small intestinal histopathology. We defined IHD as death or incident disease in myocardial infarction or angina pectoris in Swedish national registers. In 2006 to 2008, we collected duodenal/jejunal biopsy data on CD (equal to villous atrophy; Marsh 3; n=28 190 unique individuals) and inflammation without villous atrophy (Marsh 1 to 2; n=12 598) from all 28 pathology departments in Sweden. A third cohort consisted of 3658 individuals with normal mucosa but positive CD serology (Marsh 0, latent CD). We found an increased risk of incident IHD in patients undergoing small intestinal biopsy that was independent of small intestinal histopathology (CD: hazard ratio [HR], 1.19; 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.11 to 1.28; 991 events; inflammation: HR, 1.28; 95% CI, 1.19 to 1.39; 809 events; and latent CD: HR, 1.14; 95% CI, 0.87 to 1.50; 62 events). Celiac disease (HR, 1.22; 95% CI, 1.06 to 1.40) and inflammation (HR, 1.32; 95% CI, 1.14 to 1.52) were both associated with death resulting from IHD, whereas latent CD was not (HR, 0.71; 95% CI, 0.34 to 1.50).
Individuals with CD or small intestinal inflammation are at increased risk of incident IHD. We were unable to show a positive association between latent CD and incident IHD.
Notes
Comment In: Circulation. 2011 Oct 18;124(16):e422; author reply e42322007107
PubMed ID
21262996 View in PubMed
Less detail

No increased occurrence of ischemic heart disease prior to the onset of rheumatoid arthritis: results from two Swedish population-based rheumatoid arthritis cohorts.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature148279
Source
Arthritis Rheum. 2009 Oct;60(10):2861-9
Publication Type
Article
Date
Oct-2009
Author
Marie E Holmqvist
Sara Wedrén
Lennart T H Jacobsson
Lars Klareskog
Fredrik Nyberg
Solbritt Rantapää-Dahlqvist
Lars Alfredsson
Johan Askling
Author Affiliation
Institute of Environmental Medicine, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden. marie.gunnarsson@ki.se
Source
Arthritis Rheum. 2009 Oct;60(10):2861-9
Date
Oct-2009
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Aged
Angina Pectoris - complications
Arthritis, Rheumatoid - complications - diagnosis - etiology
Case-Control Studies
Cohort Studies
Female
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Myocardial Infarction - complications
Myocardial Ischemia - epidemiology - etiology
Prevalence
Registries
Risk factors
Sweden - epidemiology
Abstract
To investigate the relative importance of shared etiologies for rheumatoid arthritis (RA) and ischemic heart disease (IHD) in terms of the well-known increased risk of IHD in patients with RA, by assessing the occurrence of IHD up until the time of the onset of the first symptoms of RA.
We assessed the prevalence of a history of IHD, myocardial infarction (MI), and angina pectoris before the onset of RA symptoms in 2 large population-based case-control studies. Patients with newly diagnosed RA according to the criteria of the American College of Rheumatology were included as cases. We used data from the Swedish Early Arthritis Register study and the Swedish Epidemiologic Investigation of Rheumatoid Arthritis case-control study and from general population controls. Information on IHD, MI, and angina pectoris was obtained from the nationwide Hospital Discharge Register and from self reports. We calculated odds ratios (ORs) and 95% confidence intervals (95% CIs) to compare the prevalence of a history of IHD/MI/angina pectoris among patients with RA with that among population controls.
We could not detect any increased occurrence of IHD, MI, or angina pectoris before the onset of symptoms of RA, regardless of whether data on IHD were obtained from the Hospital Discharge Register or were self reported. As detected in the Hospital Discharge Register, the OR for IHD overall was 1.0 (95% CI 0.9-1.1), the OR for MI was 1.0 (95% CI 0.9-1.1), and the OR for angina pectoris was 1.0 (95% CI 0.9-1.2).
Shared risk factors or susceptibilities for RA and IHD are likely to contribute less than RA-related factors to the increased occurrence of IHD in patients with manifest RA. Nonetheless, the existence of shared factors associated with longer latency until the occurrence of IHD cannot be excluded.
Notes
Comment In: Arthritis Rheum. 2010 Aug;62(8):2561; author reply 256120506233
PubMed ID
19790058 View in PubMed
Less detail