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A 32-year longitudinal study of alcohol consumption in Swedish women: Reduced risk of myocardial infarction but increased risk of cancer.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature275258
Source
Scand J Prim Health Care. 2015;33(3):153-62
Publication Type
Article
Date
2015
Author
Dominique Hange
Jóhann A Sigurdsson
Cecilia Björkelund
Valter Sundh
Calle Bengtsson
Source
Scand J Prim Health Care. 2015;33(3):153-62
Date
2015
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Alcohol Drinking - adverse effects
Beer
Diabetes Mellitus - epidemiology
Ethanol - adverse effects - therapeutic use
Female
Humans
Incidence
Longitudinal Studies
Middle Aged
Myocardial Infarction - prevention & control
Neoplasms - etiology
Proportional Hazards Models
Prospective Studies
Risk factors
Risk Reduction Behavior
Stroke - epidemiology
Sweden - epidemiology
Abstract
To assess associations between the intake of different types of alcoholic beverages and the 32-year incidence of myocardial infarction, stroke, diabetes, and cancer, as well as mortality, in a middle-aged female population.
Prospective study.
Gothenburg, Sweden, population about 430 000.
Representative sample of a general population of women (1462 in total) aged 38 to 60 years in 1968-1969, followed up to the ages of 70 to 92 years in 2000-2001.
Associations between alcohol intake and later risk of mortality and morbidity from myocardial infarction, stroke, diabetes, and cancer, studied longitudinally.
During the follow-up period, 185 women developed myocardial infarction, 162 developed stroke, 160 women became diabetic, and 345 developed cancer. Women who drank beer had a 30% lower risk (hazards ratio (HR) 0.70, 95% confidence interval (CI) 0.50-0.95) of developing myocardial infarcion and almost half the risk (HR 0.51 CI 0.33-0.80). A significant association between increased risk of death from cancer and high spirits consumption was also shown (hazards ratio [HR] 1.47, CI 1.06-2.05).
Women with moderate consumption of beer had a reduced risk of developing myocardial infarction. High spirits consumption was associated with increased risk of cancer mortality.
Notes
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PubMed ID
26194171 View in PubMed
Less detail

AHA/ACC scientific statement: consensus panel statement. Guide to preventive cardiology for women. American Heart Association/American College of Cardiology.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature202098
Source
J Am Coll Cardiol. 1999 May;33(6):1751-5
Publication Type
Conference/Meeting Material
Article
Date
May-1999

[Anticholesteremic statins reduce myocardial infarction. Milestone studies give a straight answer--at least concerning the males]

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature54248
Source
Lakartidningen. 1999 Apr 7;96(14):1725-8
Publication Type
Article
Date
Apr-7-1999

Association of aspirin dosage to clinical outcomes after percutaneous coronary intervention: observations from the Ottawa Heart Institute PCI Registry.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature152283
Source
J Invasive Cardiol. 2009 Mar;21(3):121-7
Publication Type
Article
Date
Mar-2009
Author
Derek So
E Francis Cook
Michel Le May
Chris Glover
William Williams
Andrew Ha
Richard Davies
Michael Froeschl
Jean-Fran Cois Marquis
Edward O'Brien
Marino Labinaz
Author Affiliation
University of Ottawa Heart Institute, Cardiology, Ottawa, Ontario, Canada. dso@ottawaheart.ca
Source
J Invasive Cardiol. 2009 Mar;21(3):121-7
Date
Mar-2009
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Angioplasty, Balloon, Coronary - methods
Aspirin - adverse effects - therapeutic use
Canada
Combined Modality Therapy
Dose-Response Relationship, Drug
Female
Follow-Up Studies
Heart Failure - therapy
Humans
Logistic Models
Male
Myocardial Infarction - prevention & control - therapy
Myocardial Ischemia - prevention & control - therapy
Outcome Assessment (Health Care)
Patient Discharge
Platelet Aggregation Inhibitors - adverse effects - therapeutic use
Prospective Studies
Recurrence - prevention & control
Registries
Retrospective Studies
Abstract
Dual antiplatelet therapy, with aspirin and a thienopyridine, is the accepted treatment after percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI). No clear evidence exists regarding the ideal dosage of aspirin. Recent guidelines recommend higher-dose aspirin because of the possible decrease in stent thrombosis. The purpose of this study was to test the hypothesis that high-dose aspirin of 325 mg decreases death and myocardial infarction (MI) compared to a lower dose of 81 mg in patients undergoing PCI.
An observational cohort study of 1,840 consecutive patients who underwent PCI was conducted. Patients who did not survive to discharge were excluded. The primary endpoint was a composite of all-cause mortality and MI at 1 year.
Nine-hundred and thirty patients (50.5%) were discharged on 325 mg of aspirin and 910 (49.5%) were discharged of 81 mg. The risk of all-cause mortality or MI was not significantly different between patients: low-dose 5.49% (50/910) vs. high-dose 4.19% (39/930); adjusted odds ratio [OR], 1.16; 95% confidence interval [CI], 0.73-1.85). In a multivariable analysis, the Charlson comorbidity score (OR, 1.37; 95% CI, 1.18-1.58) and urgent PCI (OR, 1.75; 95% CI, 1.03-3.00) were associated with increased death or MI. Among patients with drug-eluting stents, the use of low-dose aspirin did not predispose them to death or MI (adjusted OR, 1.12, 95% CI, 0.53-2.34).
In this large contemporary analysis of PCI patients, no differences in death or MI were observed at 1 year between patients discharged on low-dose aspirin 81 mg compared to patients on a higher dose.
PubMed ID
19258643 View in PubMed
Less detail

Atherosclerosis and restenosis: reflections on the Lovastatin Restenosis Trial and Scandinavian Simvastatin Survival Study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature210757
Source
Am J Cardiol. 1996 Nov 1;78(9):1036-8
Publication Type
Article
Date
Nov-1-1996
Author
W S Weintraub
J P Pederson
Source
Am J Cardiol. 1996 Nov 1;78(9):1036-8
Date
Nov-1-1996
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Angioplasty, Balloon, Coronary
Anticholesteremic Agents - therapeutic use
Coronary Artery Disease - blood - complications - mortality - prevention & control
Death, Sudden, Cardiac - prevention & control
Humans
Lovastatin - analogs & derivatives - therapeutic use
Myocardial Infarction - prevention & control
Pravastatin - therapeutic use
Randomized Controlled Trials as Topic
Recurrence
Scandinavia
Simvastatin
Survival Analysis
Abstract
Atherosclerosis is related to serum lipids, whereas restenosis after coronary angioplasty is probably not, reflecting different pathophysiologies. Nonetheless, treatment of lipid disorders is appropriate after angioplasty.
PubMed ID
8916484 View in PubMed
Less detail

[Calcium antagonists in cardiovascular disease. Clinical evidence from morbidity and mortality trials]

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature20229
Source
Drugs. 2000;59 Spec No 2:25-37
Publication Type
Article
Date
2000
Author
S. Oparil
S E Bakir
Author Affiliation
Université d'Alabama, Département de Médecine, Biologie Vasculaire et Hypertension, Birmingham, USA. soparil@uab.edu
Source
Drugs. 2000;59 Spec No 2:25-37
Date
2000
Language
French
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aged
Antihypertensive Agents - pharmacology - therapeutic use
Calcium Channel Blockers - pharmacology - therapeutic use
Cerebrovascular Accident - prevention & control
English Abstract
Humans
Hypertension - complications - drug therapy
Morbidity
Myocardial Infarction - prevention & control
Randomized Controlled Trials
Research Design
Abstract
Calcium antagonists, particularly the newer, longer-acting agents, are clearly effective in reducing elevated blood pressure with minimal to modest adverse effect profiles, and are therefore used extensively. The goal of antihypertensive therapy, however, is not simply to reduce blood pressure, but also to reduce vascular injury due to hypertension. Prospective controlled clinical trials evaluating cardiovascular morbidity and mortality are needed to test calcium antagonists in patients with hypertension. This review summarises the design and, in some cases, the results of 7 trials (5 of them still ongoing) that have provided insight into the effects of moderate- to long-acting calcium antagonists on mortality and target-organ damage in patients with hypertension. The Systolic Hypertension in Europe (Syst-Eur) trial studied 4695 elderly patients with isolated systolic hypertension, and demonstrated significant reductions in stroke and all fatal and nonfatal cardiac end-points in patients randomised to nitrendipine versus placebo. The Antihypertensive and Lipid-Lowering Treatment to Prevent Heart Attack Trial (ALLHAT) compares the effects of standard diuretic treatment with 3 alternatives (amlodipine, lisinopril, and doxazosin) on the incidence of fatal coronary artery disease and nonfatal myocardial infarction in more than 42,000 hypertensive patients with additional cardiovascular risk factors. The Anglo-Scandinavian Cardiac Outcomes Trial (ASCOT) compares the effects of amlodipine +/- perindopril with atenolol +/- bendrofluazide on fatal coronary artery disease and nonfatal myocardial infarction in 18,000 high risk patients. The Controlled ONset Verapamil INvestigation of Cardiovascular End-points (CONVINCE) study is assessing the incidence of fatal or nonfatal myocardial infarction and stroke, and cardiovascular disease-related death in patients on controlled-onset extended-release verapamil compared with a standard regimen of hydrochlorothiazide or atenolol. The Nordic Diltiazem Study (NORDIL) also compares a calcium antagonist (diltiazem) with conventional antihypertensive drug treatment (diuretics or beta-blockers) with add-on therapy as needed, in preventing cardiovascular mortality or morbidity. The Prospective Randomized Evaluation of the Vascular Effects of Norvasc Trial (PREVENT) tests a similar hypothesis, examining the effects of amlodipine on atherosclerotic lesions. The African-American Study of Kidney Disease (AASK) trial is evaluating the effects of amlodipine in hypertensive patients with renal disease. These important clinical trials of different classes of antihypertensive agents are critical for optimising the treatment of hypertensive patients in order to prevent coronary artery disease and other vascular diseases in this new millennium. Importantly, these randomised trials are free of the major problems of observational studies, i.e., confounding by indication, and should fully address the concerns raised by observational studies and small, under-powered, randomised trials that calcium antagonists may have adverse effects on myocardial infarction, bleeding and cancer. To date, these trials in progress have provided no evidence to support these concerns.
PubMed ID
11002856 View in PubMed
Less detail

69 records – page 1 of 7.