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[7 years' experience with physical training in infarct]

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature55950
Source
Lakartidningen. 1979 Dec 12;76(50):4617-21
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-12-1979

A 10-month angiographic and 4-year clinical outcome of everolimus-eluting versus sirolimus-eluting coronary stents in patients with diabetes mellitus (the DiabeDES IV randomized angiography trial).

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature275976
Source
Catheter Cardiovasc Interv. 2015 Dec 1;86(7):1161-7
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-1-2015
Author
Michael Maeng
Arvydas Baranauskas
Evald Høj Christiansen
Anne Kaltoft
Niels Ramsing Holm
Lars Romer Krusell
Jan Ravkilde
Hans-Henrik Tilsted
Per Thayssen
Lisette Okkels Jensen
Source
Catheter Cardiovasc Interv. 2015 Dec 1;86(7):1161-7
Date
Dec-1-2015
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aged
Cardiovascular Agents - administration & dosage
Coronary Angiography
Coronary Artery Disease - mortality - radiography - therapy
Coronary Restenosis - mortality - radiography
Coronary Stenosis - mortality - radiography - therapy
Coronary Thrombosis - mortality - radiography
Denmark
Diabetic Angiopathies - mortality - radiography - therapy
Drug-Eluting Stents
Everolimus - administration & dosage
Female
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Myocardial Infarction - mortality - radiography
Percutaneous Coronary Intervention - adverse effects - instrumentation - mortality
Predictive value of tests
Prospective Studies
Prosthesis Design
Risk factors
Sirolimus - administration & dosage
Time Factors
Treatment Outcome
Abstract
We aimed to compare angiographic and clinical outcomes after the implantation of everolimus-eluting (EES) and sirolimus-eluting (SES) stents in patients with diabetes.
There are limited data on long-term outcome after EES vs SES implantation in diabetic patients.
We randomized 213 patients with diabetes and coronary artery disease to EES (n?=?108) or SES (n?=?105) implantation. Angiographic follow-up was performed 10 months after the index procedure and all patients were followed clinically for 4 years. The primary endpoint was angiographic in-stent late luminal loss at 10-month follow-up. Secondary endpoints included angiographic restenosis rate, the need for target lesion revascularization (TLR) and major adverse cardiac events (MACE; defined as cardiac death, myocardial infarction, definite stent thrombosis, or TLR) at 4-year follow-up.
At 10-month angiographic follow-up, in-stent late lumen loss was 0.20?±?0.53 mm and 0.11?±?0.49 mm (P?=?0.28), and angiographic restenosis rate was 3.8% and 5.2% (P?=?0.72) in the EES and SES groups, respectively. At 4-year clinical follow-up, MACE had occurred in 22 (20.4%) patients in the EES group and 25 (23.8%) patients in SES group (HR 0.84, 95% CI 0.47-1.49; P?=?0.55), with TLR performed in 6 (5.6%) and 10 (9.5%) patients in the two groups (HR 0.57, 95% CI 0.21-1-58; P?=?0.28).
EES and SES had comparable 10-month angiographic and 4-year clinical outcomes in patients with diabetes mellitus and coronary artery disease.
PubMed ID
25640050 View in PubMed
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21 year trends in incidence of myocardial infarction and mortality from coronary disease in middle-age.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature210947
Source
Eur Heart J. 1996 Oct;17(10):1495-502
Publication Type
Article
Date
Oct-1996
Author
P. Immonen-Räihä
M. Arstila
J. Tuomilehto
M. Haikio
A. Mononen
T. Vuorenmaa
J. Torppa
I. Parvinen
Author Affiliation
Health Office City of Turku, Finland.
Source
Eur Heart J. 1996 Oct;17(10):1495-502
Date
Oct-1996
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Blood pressure
Cholesterol - blood
Coronary Disease - mortality - prevention & control
Cross-Sectional Studies
Female
Finland
Humans
Incidence
Male
Middle Aged
Myocardial Infarction - mortality - prevention & control
Registries - statistics & numerical data
Survival Analysis
Urban Population - statistics & numerical data
Abstract
The aim of this study is to describe the 21 year trends in myocardial infarction among middle-aged inhabitants in the city of Turku, in southwestern Finland. Since 1972 the coronary register in Turku has monitored acute coronary events leading to hospital admission or death, first according to the methods of the World Health Organization Heart Attack Register Study, and since 1982 according to the methods of the WHO MONICA. From 1972 to 1992 we registered 7374 events of suspected myocardial infarction, of which 6045 events occurring in inhabitants of Turku aged 35-64 years, fulfilled the criteria for myocardial infarction. Within 28 days, 2266 coronary events proved fatal. During the 21-year period, the incidence of definite myocardial infarction fell by 55% in men and by 62% in women, and coronary mortality fell by 66 and 81%, respectively. From 1972 to 1982, total mortality and coronary mortality decreased in parallel. Later on, the decrease in total mortality levelled off, even though coronary mortality fell still steeper, because mortality from external causes of death increased. The favourable long-term trends reflect favourable changes in total cholesterol and blood pressure in the middle-aged population, and the improvement in the treatment of myocardial infarction. Further efforts are needed to enhance this trend, but also to reduce total mortality among middle-aged people.
Notes
Comment In: Eur Heart J. 1996 Oct;17(10):1455-68909894
PubMed ID
8909905 View in PubMed
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25 year trends in first time hospitalisation for acute myocardial infarction, subsequent short and long term mortality, and the prognostic impact of sex and comorbidity: a Danish nationwide cohort study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature127603
Source
BMJ. 2012;344:e356
Publication Type
Article
Date
2012
Author
Morten Schmidt
Jacob Bonde Jacobsen
Timothy L Lash
Hans Erik Bøtker
Henrik Toft Sørensen
Author Affiliation
Department of Clinical Epidemiology, Aarhus University Hospital, Denmark. msc@dce.au.dk
Source
BMJ. 2012;344:e356
Date
2012
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Cohort Studies
Comorbidity
Denmark - epidemiology
Female
Hospitalization - statistics & numerical data
Humans
Incidence
Male
Middle Aged
Myocardial Infarction - mortality
Prognosis
Risk factors
Sex Factors
Survival Rate
Time Factors
Abstract
To examine 25 year trends in first time hospitalisation for acute myocardial infarction in Denmark, subsequent short and long term mortality, and the prognostic impact of sex and comorbidity.
Nationwide population based cohort study using medical registries.
All hospitals in Denmark.
234,331 patients with a first time hospitalisation for myocardial infarction from 1984 through 2008.
Standardised incidence rate of myocardial infarction and 30 day and 31-365 day mortality by sex. Comorbidity categories were defined as normal, moderate, severe, and very severe according to the Charlson comorbidity index, and were compared by means of mortality rate ratios based on Cox regression.
The standardised incidence rate per 100,000 people decreased in the 25 year period by 37% for women (from 209 to 131) and by 48% for men (from 410 to 213). The 30 day, 31-365 day, and one year mortality declined from 31.4%, 15.6%, and 42.1% in 1984-8 to 14.8%, 11.1%, and 24.2% in 2004-8, respectively. After adjustment for age at time of myocardial infarction, men and women had the same one year risk of dying. The mortality reduction was independent of comorbidity category. Comparing patients with very severe versus normal comorbidity during 2004-8, the mortality rate ratio, adjusted for age and sex, was 1.96 (95% CI 1.83 to 2.11) within 30 days and 3.89 (3.58 to 4.24) within 31-365 days.
The rate of first time hospitalisation for myocardial infarction and subsequent short term mortality both declined by nearly half between 1984 and 2008. The reduction in mortality occurred for all patients, independent of sex and comorbidity. However, comorbidity burden was a strong prognostic factor for short and long term mortality, while sex was not.
Notes
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Comment In: Nat Rev Cardiol. 2012 Apr;9(4):18622348972
Comment In: BMJ. 2012;344:d780922279112
PubMed ID
22279115 View in PubMed
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Acute myocardial infarction: a comparison of short-term survival in national outcome registries in Sweden and the UK.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature105169
Source
Lancet. 2014 Apr 12;383(9925):1305-12
Publication Type
Article
Date
Apr-12-2014
Author
Sheng-Chia Chung
Rolf Gedeborg
Owen Nicholas
Stefan James
Anders Jeppsson
Charles Wolfe
Peter Heuschmann
Lars Wallentin
John Deanfield
Adam Timmis
Tomas Jernberg
Harry Hemingway
Author Affiliation
Farr Institute of Health Informatics Research at UCL Partners, University College London, London, UK.
Source
Lancet. 2014 Apr 12;383(9925):1305-12
Date
Apr-12-2014
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aged
Female
Great Britain - epidemiology
Humans
Male
Myocardial Infarction - mortality - therapy
Registries
Risk factors
Survival Analysis
Sweden - epidemiology
Abstract
International research for acute myocardial infarction lacks comparisons of whole health systems. We assessed time trends for care and outcomes in Sweden and the UK.
We used data from national registries on consecutive patients registered between 2004 and 2010 in all hospitals providing care for acute coronary syndrome in Sweden and the UK. The primary outcome was all-cause mortality 30 days after admission. We compared effectiveness of treatment by indirect casemix standardisation. This study is registered with ClinicalTrials.gov, number NCT01359033.
We assessed data for 119,786 patients in Sweden and 391,077 in the UK. 30-day mortality was 7·6% (95% CI 7·4-7·7) in Sweden and 10·5% (10·4-10·6) in the UK. Mortality was higher in the UK in clinically relevant subgroups defined by troponin concentration, ST-segment elevation, age, sex, heart rate, systolic blood pressure, diabetes mellitus status, and smoking status. In Sweden, compared with the UK, there was earlier and more extensive uptake of primary percutaneous coronary intervention (59% vs 22%) and more frequent use of ß blockers at discharge (89% vs 78%). After casemix standardisation the 30-day mortality ratio for UK versus Sweden was 1·37 (95% CI 1·30-1·45), which corresponds to 11,263 (95% CI 9620-12,827) excess deaths, but did decline over time (from 1·47, 95% CI 1·38-1·58 in 2004 to 1·20, 1·12-1·29 in 2010; p=0·01).
We found clinically important differences between countries in acute myocardial infarction care and outcomes. International comparisons research might help to improve health systems and prevent deaths.
Seventh Framework Programme for Research, National Institute for Health Research, Wellcome Trust (UK), Swedish Association of Local Authorities and Regions, Swedish Heart-Lung Foundation.
Notes
Comment In: Lancet. 2014 Apr 12;383(9925):1274-624461716
Comment In: Lancet. 2014 Apr 19;383(9926):136024759236
Comment In: Lancet. 2014 Jul 26;384(9940):303-425066152
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Comment In: Lancet. 2014 Jul 26;384(9940):305-625066155
Comment In: Nat Rev Cardiol. 2014 Mar;11(3):12624514022
PubMed ID
24461715 View in PubMed
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[Acute myocardial infarction. Cases from the Gjøvik County Hospital]

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature55805
Source
Tidsskr Nor Laegeforen. 1983 Mar 10;103(7):667-70
Publication Type
Article
Date
Mar-10-1983
Author
P. Smith
O. Breder
Source
Tidsskr Nor Laegeforen. 1983 Mar 10;103(7):667-70
Date
Mar-10-1983
Language
Norwegian
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Aged
Female
Hospitals, County
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Myocardial Infarction - mortality - therapy
Norway
Resuscitation
PubMed ID
6868043 View in PubMed
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Acute myocardial infarction: does pre-hospital treatment increase survival?

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature52222
Source
Eur J Emerg Med. 2002 Sep;9(3):210-6
Publication Type
Article
Date
Sep-2002
Author
J. Koefoed-Nielsen
E F Christensen
H. Melchiorsen
A. Foldspang
Author Affiliation
Department of Anaesthesiology, University Hospital of Aarhus, Denmark.
Source
Eur J Emerg Med. 2002 Sep;9(3):210-6
Date
Sep-2002
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Ambulances
Angioplasty, Transluminal, Percutaneous Coronary
Denmark
Emergency Medical Services - statistics & numerical data
Female
Humans
Logistic Models
Male
Middle Aged
Myocardial Infarction - mortality - therapy
Registries
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Urban Population
Abstract
The aim of this study was to assess the impact of a mobile emergency care unit (MECU) staffed with an anaesthetist, in terms of increased survival among patients with acute myocardial infarction (MI). The setting was an urban area with 330 000 inhabitants. This was a quasi-experimental before-and-after-study including consecutive emergency calls during September to November 1996 (Period 1, without the MECU) and September to November 1997 (Period 2, including the MECU). Fifty-four ambulance patients had their MI diagnosis confirmed at hospital during Period 1, and another 54 in Period 2. The 28-day mortality was collected from relevant registers. Twenty-four (44%) of Period 2 patients were transported by the MECU. MECU patients had lower systolic blood pressure (SBP) than other patients, both before and after hospital admission. Nitroglycerine treatment was relatively frequent in MECU patients, and cardioversion, anaesthesia and intubation was applied exclusively in these patients. After arrival at hospital, MECU patients had thrombolysis relatively often (46% versus 23% in other Period 2 patients) but percutaneous transluminal coronary angioplasty (PTCA) relatively infrequently (21% vs 30%). The total mortality was significantly lower in Period 2 than in Period 1 patients (11% vs 21%,
PubMed ID
12394616 View in PubMed
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Acute myocardial infarction in a medical intensive care unit during a 3 year period, 1977-79.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature55866
Source
J Oslo City Hosp. 1981 Dec;31(12):147-51
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-1981

Acute myocardial infarction in Stockholm--a medical information system as an epidemiological tool.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature56013
Source
Int J Epidemiol. 1978 Sep;7(3):271-6
Publication Type
Article
Date
Sep-1978
Author
A. Ahlbom
Source
Int J Epidemiol. 1978 Sep;7(3):271-6
Date
Sep-1978
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Acute Disease
Adult
Aged
Epidemiologic Methods
Female
Hospitalization
Humans
Information Systems
Length of Stay
Male
Middle Aged
Myocardial Infarction - mortality
Registries
Sweden
Abstract
The objects of the present study were to perform an epidemiological study of acute myocardial infarction in Stockholm County and to investigate and develop the methods by which the medical information system in Stockholm can be used as an epidemiological tool. The possible sources of error were enumerated and their importance assessed. It is concluded that the available routinely collected computer data are useful for estimation of incidence, mortality, and case fatality. Incidence, and case fatality rates are shown to be similar to results from other Swedish studies.
PubMed ID
721364 View in PubMed
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Acute myocardial infarction: survey of urban and rural hospital mortality.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature242342
Source
Am Heart J. 1983 Jan;105(1):44-53
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jan-1983
Author
A L Morris
V. Nernberg
N P Roos
P. Henteleff
L. Roos
Source
Am Heart J. 1983 Jan;105(1):44-53
Date
Jan-1983
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aged
Coronary Care Units
Female
Hospitals
Hospitals, Municipal
Humans
Male
Manitoba
Middle Aged
Myocardial Infarction - mortality
Random Allocation
Resuscitation
Retrospective Studies
Rural Population
Urban Population
Ventricular Fibrillation - mortality
Abstract
Mortality rates for acute myocardial infarction (AMI) in the province of Manitoba were studied by a retrospective, randomized survey of urban and rural hospital records. Urban hospitals had formal coronary care unit (CCU). Selected rural hospitals lacked CCUs but usually possessed portable monitoring and defibrillation equipment. Twenty-seven percent of 852 cases in the study population died. The mortality rate for unequivocal AMI was 14% to 15% to both urban and rural hospitals. Patients with possible AMI had high mortality rates in both facilities (41% to 45%). Subgroup analysis of the definite AMI population failed to reveal statistically significant differences in urban vs rural mortality, although a consistent trend toward superior performance in urban centers was found. The magnitude of the potential of a rural hospital intervention program to reduce the AMI mortality nevertheless appeared to be small.
PubMed ID
6849240 View in PubMed
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516 records – page 1 of 52.