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Albuminuria, metabolic syndrome and the risk of mortality and cardiovascular events.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature90754
Source
Atherosclerosis. 2009 Jun;204(2):503-8
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-2009
Author
Solbu Marit D
Kronborg Jens
Jenssen Trond G
Njølstad Inger
Løchen Maja-Lisa
Mathiesen Ellisiv B
Wilsgaard Tom
Eriksen Bjørn O
Toft Ingrid
Author Affiliation
Department of Nephrology, University Hospital of North Norway, Tromsø, Norway. marit.solbu@unn.no
Source
Atherosclerosis. 2009 Jun;204(2):503-8
Date
Jun-2009
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aged
Albuminuria - complications - mortality - urine
Biological Markers - urine
Creatinine - urine
Female
Humans
Incidence
Male
Metabolic Syndrome X - complications - mortality
Middle Aged
Myocardial Infarction - etiology - mortality
Norway - epidemiology
Population Surveillance
Proportional Hazards Models
Prospective Studies
Risk assessment
Risk factors
Stroke - etiology - mortality
Time Factors
Abstract
AIM: Increased urinary albumin-excretion is a cardiovascular risk-factor. The cardiovascular risk of the metabolic syndrome (MetS) is debated. The aim of the present prospective, population-based study of non-diabetic individuals was to examine the association between low-grade urinary albumin-excretion, MetS, and cardiovascular morbidity and all-cause mortality. METHODS: 5215 non-diabetic, non-proteinuric men and women participating in the Tromsø Study 1994-1995 were included. Urinary albumin-creatinine ratio (ACR) was measured in three urine samples. The participants were categorized into four groups by the presence/absence of MetS (the International Diabetes Federation definition) and ACR in the upper tertile (>or=0.75 mg/mmol). RESULTS: Median follow-up time was 9.6 years for first ever myocardial infarction, 9.7 years for ischemic stroke and 12.4 years for mortality. High ACR (upper tertile)/MetS was associated with increased risk of myocardial infarction (hazard ratio (HR) 1.75; 95% confidence interval (CI): 1.30-2.37, por=0.75 mg/mmol was associated with cardiovascular morbidity and all-cause mortality independently of MetS. MetS was not associated with any end-point beyond what was predicted from its components. Thus, low-grade albuminuria, but not MetS, may be used for risk stratification in non-diabetic subjects.
Notes
Comment In: Atherosclerosis. 2009 Jun;204(2):348-9; author reply 350-119201409
PubMed ID
19091314 View in PubMed
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Amino-terminal pro-B-type natriuretic peptide and high-sensitivity C-reactive protein but not cystatin C predict cardiovascular events in male patients with peripheral artery disease independently of ambulatory pulse pressure.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature257122
Source
Am J Hypertens. 2014 Mar;27(3):363-71
Publication Type
Article
Date
Mar-2014
Author
Per H Skoglund
Johannes Arpegård
Jan Ostergren
Per Svensson
Author Affiliation
Karolinska Institutet, Department of Medicine, Solna, Internal Medicine Unit and Emergency Department, Karolinska University Hospital Solna, Stockholm, Sweden.
Source
Am J Hypertens. 2014 Mar;27(3):363-71
Date
Mar-2014
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aged
Area Under Curve
Biological Markers - blood
Blood pressure
Blood Pressure Monitoring, Ambulatory
C-Reactive Protein - metabolism
Chi-Square Distribution
Cystatin C - blood
Disease Progression
Disease-Free Survival
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Multivariate Analysis
Myocardial Infarction - etiology - mortality
Myocardial Revascularization
Natriuretic Peptide, Brain - blood
Patient Admission
Peptide Fragments - blood
Peripheral Arterial Disease - blood - complications - diagnosis - mortality - physiopathology
Predictive value of tests
Proportional Hazards Models
ROC Curve
Risk assessment
Risk factors
Sex Factors
Stroke - etiology - mortality
Sweden
Time Factors
Abstract
Patients with peripheral arterial disease (PAD) are at high risk for cardiovascular (CV) events. We have previously shown that ambulatory pulse pressure (APP) predicts CV events in PAD patients. The biomarkers amino-terminal pro-B-type natriuretic peptide (NT-proBNP), high-sensitivity C-reactive protein (hs-CRP), and cystatin C are related to a worse outcome in patients with CV disease, but their predictive values have not been studied in relation to APP.
Blood samples and 24-hour measurements of ambulatory blood pressure were examined in 98 men referred for PAD evaluation during 1998-2001. Patients were followed for a median of 71 months. The outcome variable was CV events defined as either CV mortality or any hospitalization for myocardial infarction, stroke, or coronary revascularization. The predictive values of log(NT-proBNP), log(hs-CRP), and log(cystatin C) alone and together with APP were assessed by multivariable Cox regression. Area under the curve (AUC) and net reclassification improvement (NRI) were calculated compared with a model containing other significant risk factors.
During follow-up, 36 patients had at least 1 CV event. APP, log(NT-proBNP), and log(hs-CRP) all predicted CV events in univariable analysis, whereas log(cystatin C) did not. In multivariable analysis log(NT-proBNP) (hazard ratio (HR) = 1.62; 95% confidence interval (CI) = 1.05-2.51) and log(hs-CRP) (HR = 1.63; 95% CI = 1.19-2.24) predicted events independently of 24-hour PP. The combination of log(NT-proBNP), log(hs-CRP), and average day PP improved risk discrimination (AUC = 0.833 vs. 0.736; P
PubMed ID
24470529 View in PubMed
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Angiographic morphology impacts outcomes in STEMI patients with LAD occlusion.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature143251
Source
Catheter Cardiovasc Interv. 2011 Jan 1;77(1):29-34
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jan-1-2011
Author
Karin Arinell
Johan Josefsson
Anders Magnuson
Ole Fröbert
Author Affiliation
Department of Cardiology, Örebro University Hospital, Örebro, Sweden.
Source
Catheter Cardiovasc Interv. 2011 Jan 1;77(1):29-34
Date
Jan-1-2011
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aged
Analysis of Variance
Angioplasty, Balloon, Coronary - adverse effects - mortality
Coronary Angiography
Coronary Occlusion - complications - mortality - radiography - therapy
Female
Humans
Kaplan-Meier Estimate
Male
Middle Aged
Myocardial Infarction - etiology - mortality - radiography - therapy
Predictive value of tests
Proportional Hazards Models
Registries
Retrospective Studies
Risk assessment
Risk factors
Severity of Illness Index
Sweden
Time Factors
Treatment Outcome
Abstract
Acute proximal occlusion of the left anterior descendent coronary artery (LAD) is a critical medical condition often leading to heart failure and death. Our objective was to investigate how additional angiographic findings might influence prognosis.
In a single center setting by using consecutive data from the Swedish angiography and angioplasty registry (SCAAR), we identified all patients with acute myocardial infarction (AMI) related to the proximal LAD referred for primary coronary angioplasty. Clinical and angiographic data were collected from January 2004 to December 2008.
In the study period, 359 patients (mean age 67.9 ± 12.3 years, 111 women) were identified as having proximal LAD-related culprit lesion. Follow-up was up to 5.5 years. Compared to patients with LAD occlusion only, having both a small conus branch (
Notes
Comment In: Catheter Cardiovasc Interv. 2011 Jun 1;77(7):108621452225
PubMed ID
20506285 View in PubMed
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Body mass index and risk of perioperative cardiovascular adverse events and mortality in 34,744 Danish patients undergoing hip or knee replacement.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature258818
Source
Acta Orthop. 2014 Sep;85(5):456-62
Publication Type
Article
Date
Sep-2014
Author
Catharina Thornqvist
Gunnar H Gislason
Lars Køber
Per Føge Jensen
Christian Torp-Pedersen
Charlotte Andersson
Source
Acta Orthop. 2014 Sep;85(5):456-62
Date
Sep-2014
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Arthroplasty, Replacement, Hip - adverse effects - mortality
Arthroplasty, Replacement, Knee - adverse effects - mortality
Body mass index
Cardiovascular Diseases - etiology - mortality
Denmark - epidemiology
Female
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Myocardial Infarction - etiology - mortality
Obesity - complications - mortality
Overweight - complications - mortality
Perioperative Period - adverse effects - mortality
Risk factors
Stroke - etiology - mortality
Thinness - complications - mortality
Abstract
Obesity is a risk factor for osteoarthritis in the lower limb, yet the cardiovascular risks associated with obesity in hip or knee replacement surgery are unknown. We examined associations between body mass index (BMI) and the risk of a major adverse cardiovascular event (MACE: ischemic stroke, acute myocardial infarction, or cardiovascular death) or the risk of all-cause mortality in a nationwide Danish cohort of patients who underwent primary hip or knee replacement surgery.
Using Danish nationwide registries, we identified 34,744 patients aged = 20 years who underwent elective primary hip or knee replacement surgery between 2005 and 2011. We used multivariable Cox regression models to calculate the 30-day risks of MACE and mortality associated with 5 BMI groups (underweight (BMI
Notes
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PubMed ID
24954493 View in PubMed
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Cardiovascular mortality and morbidity in seven counties in Sweden in relation to water hardness and geological settings. The project: myocardial infarction in mid-Sweden.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature55129
Source
Eur Heart J. 1992 Jun;13(6):721-7
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-1992
Author
C. Nerbrand
K. Svärdsudd
J. Ek
G. Tibblin
Author Affiliation
Uppsala University, Department of Family Medicine, Sweden.
Source
Eur Heart J. 1992 Jun;13(6):721-7
Date
Jun-1992
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aged
Female
Geology
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Multivariate Analysis
Myocardial Infarction - etiology - mortality
Questionnaires
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Risk factors
Sweden - epidemiology
Water Supply - analysis
Abstract
An east-west regional gradient in cardiovascular mortality was found within seven counties in mid-Sweden during the years 1969-1983. The mortality differences were of considerable magnitude for ischaemic heart disease (IHD) as well as for stroke. In previous reports, in which the distribution of risk factors among middle-aged men was presented, the moderate variation among the communities could not explain the mortality variation. Water hardness has previously been reported to be inversely related to cardiovascular mortality in several countries. In this paper, water samples from all 76 communities in seven counties were analysed in relation to mortality rates from IHD and stroke for men and women. Water hardness (Ca+Mg and other minor constituents), and the sulphate and bicarbonate concentrations of the drinking water were inversely related to IHD as well as stroke mortality. The water factors were also inversely related to non-fatal IHD even when account was taken of the age variation and the traditional risk factors as measured by a postal questionnaire. Variation of the water factors accounted for 41% of the variation in IHD mortality rate and 14% of the variation in stroke mortality rate over the 76 communities.
PubMed ID
1623858 View in PubMed
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Case fatality of myocardial infarction among shift workers.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature270062
Source
Int Arch Occup Environ Health. 2015 Jul;88(5):599-605
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jul-2015
Author
Jonas Hermansson
Katja Gillander Gådin
Berndt Karlsson
Christina Reuterwall
Johan Hallqvist
Anders Knutsson
Source
Int Arch Occup Environ Health. 2015 Jul;88(5):599-605
Date
Jul-2015
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aged
Case-Control Studies
Female
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Mortality
Myocardial Infarction - etiology - mortality
Odds Ratio
Risk factors
Sleep Disorders, Circadian Rhythm - complications
Sweden
Time Factors
Abstract
Shift work has been associated with an excess risk of cardiovascular disease (CVD) and more specifically myocardial infarction (MI). The majority of the studies that found a positive association between shift work and CVD have been based on incidence data. The results from studies on cardiovascular-related mortality among shift workers have shown little or no elevated mortality associated with shift work. None of the previous studies have analysed short-term mortality (case fatality) after MI. Therefore, we investigated whether shift work is associated with increased case fatality after MI compared with day workers.
Data on incident cases with first MI were obtained from case-control study conducted in two geographical sites in Sweden (Stockholm Heart Epidemiology Program and Västernorrland Heart Epidemiology Program), including 1,542 cases (1,147 men and 395 women) of MI with complete working time information and 65 years or younger. Case fatality was defined as death within 28 days of onset of MI. Risk estimates were calculated using logistic regression.
The crude odds ratios for case fatality among male shift workers were 1.63 [95 % confidence interval (CI) 1.12, 2.38] and 0.56 (95 % CI 0.26, 1.18) for female shift workers compared with day workers. Adjustments for established cardiovascular risk factors such as diabetes type II and socio-economic status did not alter the results.
Shift work was associated with increased risk of case fatality among male shift workers after the first MI.
PubMed ID
25261317 View in PubMed
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Cholesterol and triglyceride concentration as risk factors for myocardial infarction and death in women, with special reference to influence of age.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature53728
Source
J Intern Med. 2002 Jun;251(6):484-9
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-2002
Author
P. Lindquist
C. Bengtsson
L. Lissner
C. Björkelund
Author Affiliation
Department of Primary Health Care, Göteborg University, Göteborg, Sweden. peter.lindqvist@allmed.gu.se
Source
J Intern Med. 2002 Jun;251(6):484-9
Date
Jun-2002
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Age Distribution
Cholesterol - blood
Confidence Intervals
Female
Humans
Middle Aged
Myocardial Infarction - etiology - mortality
Population Surveillance
Registries
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Risk factors
Smoking - adverse effects
Sweden
Triglycerides - blood
Abstract
OBJECTIVE: To evaluate the importance of serum cholesterol and triglyceride concentrations as predictors of myocardial infarction and death in women of different ages. DESIGN: Prospective observational study, initiated in 1968-69. Setting. Gothenburg, Sweden, with about 430 000 inhabitants. SUBJECTS: A population-based sample of 1462 women aged 38, 46, 50, 54 and 60 years at start of the study, followed up for 24 years. Main outcome measures. Within each age group, myocardial infarction and death were predicted by serum cholesterol and triglyceride concentrations and smoking in a multivariate model. RESULTS: In the total population only serum triglyceride concentration was a strong independent risk factor for both end-points studied. Serum triglyceride concentration measured in 38- and 46-year-old women had no predictive value with respect to 24-year incidence of myocardial infarction or death. In 50-, 54- and 60-year-old women, high serum triglyceride concentration consistently predicted myocardial infarction and total mortality. Serum cholesterol concentration, on the other hand, showed evidence of direct association for 24-year all-cause mortality in the younger premenopausal group. Serum cholesterol had no predictive value for myocardial infarction or mortality in the peri- and postmenopausal ages. CONCLUSIONS: There appears to be age-specificity in association between serum lipids and these end-points in women, serum cholesterol concentration being more important for younger women and serum triglyceride concentration more important for postmenopausal women as risk factors, observations which need further attention.
PubMed ID
12028503 View in PubMed
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Clinical reinfarction according to infarct location and reperfusion modality in patients with ST elevation myocardial infarction. A DANAMI-2 long-term follow-up substudy.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature91286
Source
Cardiology. 2009;113(1):72-80
Publication Type
Article
Date
2009
Author
Busk Martin
Kristensen Steen D
Rasmussen Klaus
Kelbaek Henning
Thayssen Per
Madsen Jan K
Abildgaard Ulrik
Krusell Lars R
Mortensen Leif S
Thuesen Leif
Andersen Henning R
Nielsen Torsten T
Author Affiliation
Department of Cardiology, Aarhus University Hospital Skejby, Aarhus, Denmark.
Source
Cardiology. 2009;113(1):72-80
Date
2009
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aged
Denmark - epidemiology
Female
Follow-Up Studies
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Multicenter Studies as Topic
Myocardial Infarction - etiology - mortality - pathology
Myocardial Reperfusion - methods
Myocardium - pathology
Randomized Controlled Trials as Topic
Recurrence
Abstract
OBJECTIVES: To evaluate clinical reinfarction during a 3-year follow-up after randomization to primary angioplasty versus fibrinolysis in anterior and non-anterior ST elevation myocardial infarction (STEMI). METHODS: Clinical reinfarction was prospectively assessed by an endpoint committee blinded to the study treatment. RESULTS: At 30 days, primary angioplasty compared with fibrinolysis reduced the reinfarction rate both in anterior STEMI patients (n = 823; 2.5 vs. 5.6%, p = 0.02) and in non-anterior STEMI patients (n = 743; 0.8 vs. 7.4%, p or =2 [HR = 1.42 (1.01-2.00)]. The additional late reinfarctions after angioplasty for anterior STEMI were located within the angioplasty-treated target segment. Anterior STEMI patients had smaller mean target vessel diameter, which was associated with reinfarction. CONCLUSIONS: Clinical reinfarction is an independent predictor of death. The early superiority of primary angioplasty over fibrinolysis on reinfarction rate after anterior STEMI diminished during long-term follow-up.
PubMed ID
19005253 View in PubMed
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Clopidogrel discontinuation within the first year after coronary drug-eluting stent implantation: an observational study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature259840
Source
BMC Cardiovasc Disord. 2014;14:100
Publication Type
Article
Date
2014
Author
Troels Thim
Martin Berg Johansen
Gro Egholm Chisholm
Morten Schmidt
Anne Kaltoft
Henrik Toft Sørensen
Leif Thuesen
Steen Dalby Kristensen
Hans Erik Bøtker
Lars Romer Krusell
Jens Flensted Lassen
Per Thayssen
Lisette Okkels Jensen
Hans-Henrik Tilsted
Michael Maeng
Source
BMC Cardiovasc Disord. 2014;14:100
Date
2014
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aged
Coronary Thrombosis - etiology - mortality - prevention & control
Denmark
Drug Administration Schedule
Drug Prescriptions
Drug-Eluting Stents
Female
Humans
Male
Medication Adherence
Middle Aged
Myocardial Infarction - etiology - mortality - prevention & control
Percutaneous Coronary Intervention - adverse effects - instrumentation - mortality
Platelet Aggregation Inhibitors - administration & dosage
Registries
Retrospective Studies
Risk assessment
Risk factors
Ticlopidine - administration & dosage - analogs & derivatives
Time Factors
Treatment Outcome
Abstract
The impact of adherence to the recommended duration of dual antiplatelet therapy after first generation drug-eluting stent implantation is difficult to assess in real-world settings and limited data are available.
We followed 4,154 patients treated with coronary drug-eluting stents in Western Denmark for 1 year and obtained data on redeemed clopidogrel prescriptions and major adverse cardiovascular events (MACE, i.e., cardiac death, myocardial infarction, or stent thrombosis) from medical databases.
Discontinuation of clopidogrel within the first 3 months after stent implantation was associated with a significantly increased rate of MACE at 1-year follow-up (hazard ratio (HR) 2.06; 95% confidence interval (CI): 1.08-3.93). Discontinuation 3-6 months (HR 1.29; 95% CI: 0.70-2.41) and 6-12 months (HR 1.29; 95% CI: 0.54-3.07) after stent implantation were associated with smaller, not statistically significant, increases in MACE rates. Among patients who discontinued clopidogrel, MACE rates were highest within the first 2 months after discontinuation.
Discontinuation of clopidogrel was associated with an increased rate of MACE among patients treated with drug-eluting stents. The increase was statistically significant within the first 3 months after drug-eluting stent implantation but not after 3 to 12 months.
Notes
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PubMed ID
25125079 View in PubMed
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81 records – page 1 of 9.