Skip header and navigation

Refine By

220 records – page 1 of 22.

2-year clinical outcomes after implantation of sirolimus-eluting, paclitaxel-eluting, and bare-metal coronary stents: results from the WDHR (Western Denmark Heart Registry).

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature89935
Source
J Am Coll Cardiol. 2009 Feb 24;53(8):658-64
Publication Type
Article
Date
Feb-24-2009
Author
Kaltoft Anne
Jensen Lisette Okkels
Maeng Michael
Tilsted Hans Henrik
Thayssen Per
Bøttcher Morten
Lassen Jens Flensted
Krusell Lars Romer
Rasmussen Klaus
Hansen Knud Nørregaard
Pedersen Lars
Johnsen Søren Paaske
Sørensen Henrik Toft
Thuesen Leif
Author Affiliation
Department of Cardiology, Aarhus University Hospital, Skejby, Brendstrupgaardsvej 100, 8200 Aarhus N, Denmark. annekaltoft@stofanet.dk
Source
J Am Coll Cardiol. 2009 Feb 24;53(8):658-64
Date
Feb-24-2009
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aged
Angioplasty, Transluminal, Percutaneous Coronary
Coronary Disease - mortality - therapy
Drug-Eluting Stents - adverse effects
Female
Humans
Immunosuppressive Agents
Male
Middle Aged
Myocardial Infarction - etiology
Paclitaxel
Sirolimus
Stents - adverse effects
Thrombosis - etiology
Abstract
OBJECTIVES: This registry study assessed the safety and efficacy of the 2 types of drug-eluting stents (DES), sirolimus-eluting stents (SES) and paclitaxel-eluting stents (PES), compared with bare-metal stents (BMS). BACKGROUND: Drug-eluting stents may increase the risk of stent thrombosis (ST), myocardial infarction (MI), and death. METHODS: A total of 12,395 consecutive patients with coronary intervention and stent implantation recorded in the Western Denmark Heart Registry from January 2002 through June 2005 were followed up for 2 years. Data on death and MI were ascertained from national medical databases. We used Cox regression analysis to control for confounding. RESULTS: The 2-year incidence of definite ST was 0.64% in BMS patients, 0.79% in DES patients (adjusted relative risk [RR]: 1.09; 95% confidence interval [CI]: 0.72 to 1.65), 0.50% in SES patients (adjusted RR: 0.63, 95% CI: 0.35 to 1.15), and 1.30% in PES patients (adjusted RR: 1.82, 95% CI: 1.13 to 2.94). The incidence of MI was 3.8% in BMS-treated patients, 4.5% in DES-treated patients (adjusted RR: 1.24, 95% CI: 1.02 to 1.51), 4.1% in SES-treated patients (adjusted RR: 1.15, 95% CI: 0.91 to 1.47), and 5.3% in PES-treated patients (adjusted RR: 1.38, 95% CI: 1.06 to 1.81). Whereas overall 2-year adjusted mortality was similar in the BMS and the 2 DES stent groups, 12- to 24-month mortality was higher in patients treated with PES (RR 1.46, 95% CI: 1.02 to 2.09). Target lesion revascularization was reduced in both DES groups. CONCLUSIONS: During 2 years of follow-up, patients treated with PES had an increased risk of ST and MI compared with those treated with BMS and SES. Mortality after 12 months was also increased in PES patients.
Notes
Comment In: J Am Coll Cardiol. 2009 Feb 24;53(8):665-619232898
PubMed ID
19232897 View in PubMed
Less detail

2-year patient-related versus stent-related outcomes: the SORT OUT IV (Scandinavian Organization for Randomized Trials With Clinical Outcome IV) Trial.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature120892
Source
J Am Coll Cardiol. 2012 Sep 25;60(13):1140-7
Publication Type
Article
Date
Sep-25-2012
Author
Lisette Okkels Jensen
Per Thayssen
Evald Høj Christiansen
Hans Henrik Tilsted
Michael Maeng
Knud Nørregaard Hansen
Anne Kaltoft
Henrik Steen Hansen
Hans Erik Bøtker
Lars Romer Krusell
Jan Ravkilde
Morten Madsen
Leif Thuesen
Jens Flensted Lassen
Author Affiliation
Department of Cardiology, Odense University Hospital, Odense, Denmark. okkels@dadlnet.dk
Source
J Am Coll Cardiol. 2012 Sep 25;60(13):1140-7
Date
Sep-25-2012
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aged
Angioplasty, Balloon, Coronary
Coronary Artery Disease - mortality - therapy
Death
Denmark
Drug-Eluting Stents
Female
Follow-Up Studies
Humans
Immunosuppressive Agents - therapeutic use
Male
Middle Aged
Myocardial Infarction - etiology
Myocardial Revascularization - statistics & numerical data
Single-Blind Method
Sirolimus - adverse effects - analogs & derivatives - therapeutic use
Thrombosis - etiology
Treatment Outcome
Abstract
There are limited head-to-head randomized data on patient-related versus stent-related outcomes for everolimus-eluting stents (EES) and sirolimus-eluting stents (SES).
In the SORT OUT IV (Scandinavian Organization for Randomized Trials With Clinical Outcome IV) trial, comparing the EES with the SES in patients with coronary artery disease, the EES was noninferior to the SES at 9 months.
The primary endpoint was a composite: cardiac death, myocardial infarction (MI), definite stent thrombosis, or target vessel revascularization. Safety and efficacy outcomes at 2 years were further assessed with specific focus on patient-related composite (all death, all MI, or any revascularization) and stent-related composite outcomes (cardiac death, target vessel MI, or symptom-driven target lesion revascularization). A total of 1,390 patients were assigned to receive the EES, and 1,384 patients were assigned to receive the SES.
At 2 years, the composite primary endpoint occurred in 8.3% in the EES group and in 8.7% in the SES group (hazard ratio [HR]: 0.94, 95% confidence interval [CI]: 0.73 to 1.22). The patient-related outcome: 15.0% in the EES group versus 15.6% in the SES group, (HR: 0.95, 95% CI: 0.78 to 1.15), and the stent-related outcome: 5.2% in the EES group versus 5.3% in the SES group (HR: 0.97, 95% CI: 0.70 to 1.35) did not differ between groups. Rate of definite stent thrombosis was lower in the EES group (0.2% vs. 0.9%, (HR: 0.23, 95% CI: 0.07 to 0.80).
At 2-year follow-up, the EES was found to be noninferior to the SES with regard to both patient-related and stent-related clinical outcomes.
PubMed ID
22958957 View in PubMed
Less detail

Abdominal and gynoid adipose distribution and incident myocardial infarction in women and men.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature143340
Source
Int J Obes (Lond). 2010 Dec;34(12):1752-8
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-2010
Author
P. Wiklund
F. Toss
J-H Jansson
M. Eliasson
G. Hallmans
A. Nordström
P W Franks
P. Nordström
Author Affiliation
Department of Surgical and Perioperative Sciences, Sports Medicine Unit, Umeå University, Umeå, Sweden.
Source
Int J Obes (Lond). 2010 Dec;34(12):1752-8
Date
Dec-2010
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Absorptiometry, Photon
Adipose Tissue - anatomy & histology - radionuclide imaging
Blood Glucose - physiology
Body Composition
Body mass index
Female
Humans
Hypertension - etiology
Hypertriglyceridemia - complications
Male
Middle Aged
Myocardial Infarction - etiology
Obesity - complications
Prospective Studies
Risk assessment
Risk factors
Sex Factors
Smoking - adverse effects
Sweden
Abstract
The relationships between objectively measured abdominal and gynoid adipose mass with the prospective risk of myocardial infarction (MI) has been scarcely investigated. We aimed to investigate the associations between fat distribution and the risk of MI.
Total and regional fat mass was measured using dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry (DEXA) in 2336 women and 922 men, of whom 104 subsequently experienced an MI during a mean follow-up time of 7.8 years.
In women, the strongest independent predictor of MI was the ratio of abdominal to gynoid adipose mass (hazard ratio (HR)=2.44, 95% confidence interval (CI) 1.79-3.32 per s.d. increase in adipose mass), after adjustment for age and smoking. This ratio also showed a strong association with hypertension, impaired glucose tolerance and hypertriglyceridemia (P
PubMed ID
20498655 View in PubMed
Less detail

Acute depressed mood as a trigger of acute coronary syndromes.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature81829
Source
Biol Psychiatry. 2006 Oct 15;60(8):837-42
Publication Type
Article
Date
Oct-15-2006
Author
Steptoe Andrew
Strike Philip C
Perkins-Porras Linda
McEwan Jean R
Whitehead Daisy L
Author Affiliation
Department of Epidemiology and Public Health, University College London, London, UK. a.steptoe@ucl.ac.uk
Source
Biol Psychiatry. 2006 Oct 15;60(8):837-42
Date
Oct-15-2006
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Acute Disease
Affect - physiology
Aged
Anger - physiology
Coronary Disease - epidemiology - etiology - physiopathology
Cross-Over Studies
Depression - complications - epidemiology - physiopathology
Female
Humans
Income
Life Change Events
Male
Middle Aged
Myocardial Infarction - etiology - physiopathology
Risk factors
Socioeconomic Factors
Sweden - epidemiology
Abstract
BACKGROUND: Some cases of acute coronary syndrome (ACS) may be triggered by emotional states such as anger, but it is not known if acute depressed mood can act as a trigger. METHODS: 295 men and women with a verified ACS were studied. Depressed mood in the two hours before ACS symptom onset was compared with the same period 24 hours earlier (pair-matched analysis), and with usual levels of depressed mood, using case-crossover methods. RESULTS: 46 (18.2%) patients experienced depressed mood in the two hours before ACS onset. The odds of ACS following depressed mood were 2.50 (95% confidence intervals 1.05 to 6.56) in the pair-matched analysis, while the relative risk of ACS onset following depressed mood was 4.33 (95% confidence intervals 3.39 to 6.11) compared with usual levels of depressed mood. Depressed mood preceding ACS onset was more common in lower income patients (p = .032), and was associated with recent life stress, but was not related to psychiatric status. CONCLUSIONS: Acute depressed mood may elicit biological responses that contribute to ACS, including vascular endothelial dysfunction, inflammatory cytokine release and platelet activation. Acute depressed mood may trigger potentially life-threatening cardiac events.
PubMed ID
16780810 View in PubMed
Less detail

Adverse events during treatment of critical limb ischemia with autologous peripheral blood mononuclear cell implant.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature127035
Source
Int Angiol. 2012 Feb;31(1):77-84
Publication Type
Article
Date
Feb-2012
Author
T B Jonsson
T. Larzon
B. Arfvidsson
U. Tidefelt
C G Axelsson
M. Jurstrand
L. Norgren
Author Affiliation
Department of Surgery, University Hospital, Örebro, Sweden. thomas.jonsson@surgsci.uu.se
Source
Int Angiol. 2012 Feb;31(1):77-84
Date
Feb-2012
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Amputation
Angiography, Digital Subtraction
Ankle Brachial Index
Critical Illness
Cytokines - blood
Drug Administration Schedule
Female
Granulocyte Colony-Stimulating Factor - administration & dosage
Heart Failure - etiology - mortality
Hematopoietic Stem Cell Mobilization
Humans
Intercellular Signaling Peptides and Proteins - blood
Ischemia - blood - complications - diagnosis - mortality - physiopathology - surgery
Limb Salvage
Lower Extremity - blood supply
Male
Mesenteric Vascular Occlusion - etiology - mortality
Middle Aged
Myocardial Infarction - etiology
Pain - etiology - prevention & control
Pain Measurement
Peripheral Blood Stem Cell Transplantation - adverse effects - mortality
Pilot Projects
Predictive value of tests
Recombinant Proteins - administration & dosage
Reoperation
Risk assessment
Risk factors
Sweden
Thrombosis - etiology - mortality
Time Factors
Transplantation, Autologous
Treatment Outcome
Wound Healing
Abstract
Trials have reported clinical improvement and reduced need for amputation in critical limb ischemia (CLI) patients receiving therapeutic angiogenesis with stem cells. Our objective was to test peripheral stem cell therapy efficacy and safety to gain experiences for further work.
We included nine CLI patients (mean age 76.7 ±9.7). Stem cells were mobilized to the peripheral blood by administration of G-CSF (Filgrastim) for 4 days, and were collected on day five, when 30 mL of a stem cell suspension was injected into 40 points of the limb. The clinical efficacy was evaluated by assessing pain relief, wound healing and changes in ankle-brachial pressure index (ABI). Local metabolic and inflammatory changes were measured with microdialysis, growth factors and cytokine level determination. Patients were followed for 24 weeks.
Four patients experienced some degree of improvement with pain relief and/or improved wound healing and ABI increase. One patient was lost to follow up due to chronic psychiatric illness; one was amputated after two weeks. Two patients had a myocardial infarction (MI), one died. One patient died from a massive mesenteric thrombosis after two weeks and one died from heart failure at week 11. Improved patients showed variable effects in cytokine-, growth factor- and local metabolic response.
Even with some improvement in four patients, severe complications in four out of nine patients, and two in relation to the bone marrow stimulation, made us terminate the study prematurely. We conclude that with the increased risk and the reduced potential of the treatment, peripheral blood stem cell treatment in the older age group is less appropriate. Metabolic and inflammatory response may be of value to gain insight into mechanisms and possibly to evaluate effects of therapeutic angiogenesis.
PubMed ID
22330628 View in PubMed
Less detail

Age-specific performance of the revised cardiac risk index for predicting cardiovascular risk in elective noncardiac surgery.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature266490
Source
Circ Cardiovasc Qual Outcomes. 2015 Jan;8(1):103-8
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jan-2015
Author
Charlotte Andersson
Mads Wissenberg
Mads Emil Jørgensen
Mark A Hlatky
Charlotte Mérie
Per Føge Jensen
Gunnar H Gislason
Lars Køber
Christian Torp-Pedersen
Source
Circ Cardiovasc Qual Outcomes. 2015 Jan;8(1):103-8
Date
Jan-2015
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Age Distribution
Age Factors
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Brain Ischemia - etiology
Cardiovascular Diseases - diagnosis - etiology - mortality
Comorbidity
Decision Support Techniques
Denmark
Elective Surgical Procedures
Female
Humans
Logistic Models
Male
Middle Aged
Multivariate Analysis
Myocardial Infarction - etiology
Odds Ratio
Registries
Retrospective Studies
Risk assessment
Risk factors
Stroke - etiology
Surgical Procedures, Operative - adverse effects - mortality
Time Factors
Treatment Outcome
Abstract
The revised cardiac risk index (RCRI) holds a central role in preoperative cardiac risk stratification in noncardiac surgery. Its performance in unselected populations, including different age groups, has, however, not been systematically investigated. We assessed the relationship of RCRI with major adverse cardiovascular events in an unselected cohort of patients undergoing elective, noncardiac surgery overall and in different age groups.
We followed up all individuals = 25 years who underwent major elective noncardiac surgery in Denmark (January 1, 2005, to November 30, 2011) for the 30-day risk of major adverse cardiovascular events (ischemic stroke, myocardial infarction, or cardiovascular death). There were 742 of 357,396 (0.2%), 755 of 74.889 (1.0%), 521 of 11,921 (4%), and 257 of 3146 (8%) major adverse cardiovascular events occurring in RCRI classes I, II, III, and IV. Multivariable odds ratio estimates were as follows: ischemic heart disease 3.30 (95% confidence interval, 2.96-3.69), high-risk surgery 2.70 (2.46-2.96), congestive heart failure 2.65 (2.29-3.06), cerebrovascular disease 10.02 (9.08-11.05), insulin therapy 1.62 (1.37-1.93), and kidney disease 1.45 (1.33-1.59). Modeling RCRI classes as a continuous variable, C statistic was highest among age group 56 to 65 years (0.772) and lowest for those aged >85 years (0.683). Sensitivity of RCRI class >I (ie, having = 1 risk factor) for capturing major adverse cardiovascular events was 59%, 71%, 64%, 66%, and 67% in patients aged = 55, 56 to 65, 66 to 75, 76 to 85, and >85 years, respectively; the negative predictive values were >98% across all age groups.
In a nationwide unselected cohort, the performance of the RCRI was similar to that of the original cohort. Having = 1 risk factor was of moderate sensitivity, but high negative predictive value for all ages.
PubMed ID
25587095 View in PubMed
Less detail

Albuminuria, metabolic syndrome and the risk of mortality and cardiovascular events.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature90754
Source
Atherosclerosis. 2009 Jun;204(2):503-8
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-2009
Author
Solbu Marit D
Kronborg Jens
Jenssen Trond G
Njølstad Inger
Løchen Maja-Lisa
Mathiesen Ellisiv B
Wilsgaard Tom
Eriksen Bjørn O
Toft Ingrid
Author Affiliation
Department of Nephrology, University Hospital of North Norway, Tromsø, Norway. marit.solbu@unn.no
Source
Atherosclerosis. 2009 Jun;204(2):503-8
Date
Jun-2009
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aged
Albuminuria - complications - mortality - urine
Biological Markers - urine
Creatinine - urine
Female
Humans
Incidence
Male
Metabolic Syndrome X - complications - mortality
Middle Aged
Myocardial Infarction - etiology - mortality
Norway - epidemiology
Population Surveillance
Proportional Hazards Models
Prospective Studies
Risk assessment
Risk factors
Stroke - etiology - mortality
Time Factors
Abstract
AIM: Increased urinary albumin-excretion is a cardiovascular risk-factor. The cardiovascular risk of the metabolic syndrome (MetS) is debated. The aim of the present prospective, population-based study of non-diabetic individuals was to examine the association between low-grade urinary albumin-excretion, MetS, and cardiovascular morbidity and all-cause mortality. METHODS: 5215 non-diabetic, non-proteinuric men and women participating in the Tromsø Study 1994-1995 were included. Urinary albumin-creatinine ratio (ACR) was measured in three urine samples. The participants were categorized into four groups by the presence/absence of MetS (the International Diabetes Federation definition) and ACR in the upper tertile (>or=0.75 mg/mmol). RESULTS: Median follow-up time was 9.6 years for first ever myocardial infarction, 9.7 years for ischemic stroke and 12.4 years for mortality. High ACR (upper tertile)/MetS was associated with increased risk of myocardial infarction (hazard ratio (HR) 1.75; 95% confidence interval (CI): 1.30-2.37, por=0.75 mg/mmol was associated with cardiovascular morbidity and all-cause mortality independently of MetS. MetS was not associated with any end-point beyond what was predicted from its components. Thus, low-grade albuminuria, but not MetS, may be used for risk stratification in non-diabetic subjects.
Notes
Comment In: Atherosclerosis. 2009 Jun;204(2):348-9; author reply 350-119201409
PubMed ID
19091314 View in PubMed
Less detail

Alternative Imaging Modalities in Ischemic Heart Failure (AIMI-HF) IMAGE HF Project I-A: study protocol for a randomized controlled trial.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature108622
Source
Trials. 2013;14:218
Publication Type
Article
Date
2013
Author
Eileen O'Meara
Lisa M Mielniczuk
George A Wells
Robert A deKemp
Ran Klein
Doug Coyle
Brian Mc Ardle
Ian Paterson
James A White
Malcolm Arnold
Matthias G Friedrich
Eric Larose
Alexander Dick
Benjamin Chow
Carole Dennie
Haissam Haddad
Terrence Ruddy
Heikki Ukkonen
Gerald Wisenberg
Bernard Cantin
Philippe Pibarot
Michael Freeman
Eric Turcotte
Kim Connelly
James Clarke
Kathryn Williams
Normand Racine
Linda Garrard
Jean-Claude Tardif
Jean DaSilva
Juhani Knuuti
Rob Beanlands
Author Affiliation
Montreal Heart Institute, Montréal, QC, Canada.
Source
Trials. 2013;14:218
Date
2013
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Algorithms
Canada
Clinical Protocols
Diagnostic Imaging - methods
Heart Arrest - etiology
Heart Failure - diagnosis - etiology - mortality - therapy
Humans
Magnetic Resonance Imaging
Myocardial Infarction - etiology
Myocardial Ischemia - complications - diagnosis - mortality - therapy
Patient Readmission
Patient Selection
Positron-Emission Tomography
Predictive value of tests
Prognosis
Registries
Research Design
Time Factors
Tomography, Emission-Computed, Single-Photon
Abstract
Ischemic heart disease (IHD) is the most common cause of heart failure (HF); however, the role of revascularization in these patients is still unclear. Consensus on proper use of cardiac imaging to help determine which candidates should be considered for revascularization has been hindered by the absence of clinical studies that objectively and prospectively compare the prognostic information of each test obtained using both standard and advanced imaging.
This paper describes the design and methods to be used in the Alternative Imaging Modalities in Ischemic Heart Failure (AIMI-HF) multi-center trial. The primary objective is to compare the effect of HF imaging strategies on the composite clinical endpoint of cardiac death, myocardial infarction (MI), cardiac arrest and re-hospitalization for cardiac causes.In AIMI-HF, patients with HF of ischemic etiology (n = 1,261) will follow HF imaging strategy algorithms according to the question(s) asked by the physicians (for example, Is there ischemia and/or viability?), in agreement with local practices. Patients will be randomized to either standard (SPECT, Single photon emission computed tomography) imaging modalities for ischemia and/or viability or advanced imaging modalities: cardiac magnetic resonance imaging (CMR) or positron emission tomography (PET). In addition, eligible and consenting patients who could not be randomized, but were allocated to standard or advanced imaging based on clinical decisions, will be included in a registry.
AIMI-HF will be the largest randomized trial evaluating the role of standard and advanced imaging modalities in the management of ischemic cardiomyopathy and heart failure. This trial will complement the results of the Surgical Treatment for Ischemic Heart Failure (STICH) viability substudy and the PET and Recovery Following Revascularization (PARR-2) trial. The results will provide policy makers with data to support (or not) further investment in and wider dissemination of alternative 'advanced' imaging technologies.
NCT01288560.
Notes
Cites: Am J Cardiol. 2004 May 15;93(10):1275-915135703
Cites: N Engl J Med. 1971 Dec 23;285(26):1441-65122894
Cites: Am J Cardiol. 1974 Oct 3;34(5):520-54278154
Cites: Am J Cardiol. 1983 Mar 1;51(5):831-66681931
Cites: Circulation. 1983 Oct;68(4):785-956352078
Cites: J Thorac Cardiovasc Surg. 1983 Oct;86(4):519-276604845
Cites: N Engl J Med. 1985 Jun 27;312(26):1665-713873614
Cites: N Engl J Med. 1986 Apr 3;314(14):884-83485252
Cites: Ann Surg. 1989 Sep;210(3):348-52; discussion 352-42673084
Cites: Circulation. 1990 Nov;82(5):1629-462225367
Cites: Circulation. 1991 Nov;84(5 Suppl):III290-51934422
Cites: J Am Coll Cardiol. 1993 Oct;22(4):984-978409073
Cites: Am J Cardiol. 1994 Mar 15;73(8):527-338147295
Cites: Circulation. 1994 Dec;90(6):2687-947994809
Cites: Circulation. 1998 Nov 10;98(19 Suppl):II51-69852880
Cites: J Thorac Cardiovasc Surg. 2005 Feb;129(2):246-915678031
Cites: Eur J Heart Fail. 2006 Jan;8(1):63-716084759
Cites: Can J Cardiol. 2006 Jan;22(1):23-4516450016
Cites: Can J Cardiol. 2007 Feb;23(2):107-1917311116
Cites: Curr Probl Cardiol. 2007 Jul;32(7):375-41017560992
Cites: J Nucl Med. 2007 Jul;48(7):1135-4617574986
Cites: J Am Coll Cardiol. 2007 Nov 13;50(20):2002-1217996568
Cites: JACC Cardiovasc Imaging. 2009 Jan;2(1):34-4419356530
Cites: JACC Cardiovasc Imaging. 2009 Sep;2(9):1060-819761983
Cites: J Nucl Med. 2010 Apr;51(4):567-7420237039
Cites: Am J Cardiol. 2010 Jul 15;106(2):187-9220599001
Cites: N Engl J Med. 2011 Apr 28;364(17):1607-1621463150
Cites: N Engl J Med. 2011 Apr 28;364(17):1671-321463151
Cites: N Engl J Med. 2011 Apr 28;364(17):1617-2521463153
Cites: Circ Cardiovasc Imaging. 2012 Mar;5(2):262-70; discussion 27022438424
Cites: J Am Coll Cardiol. 2001 Mar 15;37(4):992-711263626
Cites: Thorac Cardiovasc Surg. 2000 Feb;48(1):9-1410757150
Cites: Ann Intern Med. 2012 Jun 5;156(11):785-95, W-270, W-271, W-272, W-273, W-274, W-275, W-276, W-277, W-27822312131
Cites: J Am Coll Cardiol. 2001 Apr;37(5):1210-311300424
Cites: Am J Kidney Dis. 2002 Feb;39(2 Suppl 1):S1-26611904577
Cites: J Am Coll Cardiol. 2002 Apr 3;39(7):1151-811923039
Cites: Ann Intern Med. 2003 Jul 15;139(2):137-4712859163
PubMed ID
23866673 View in PubMed
Less detail

Amino-terminal pro-B-type natriuretic peptide and high-sensitivity C-reactive protein but not cystatin C predict cardiovascular events in male patients with peripheral artery disease independently of ambulatory pulse pressure.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature257122
Source
Am J Hypertens. 2014 Mar;27(3):363-71
Publication Type
Article
Date
Mar-2014
Author
Per H Skoglund
Johannes Arpegård
Jan Ostergren
Per Svensson
Author Affiliation
Karolinska Institutet, Department of Medicine, Solna, Internal Medicine Unit and Emergency Department, Karolinska University Hospital Solna, Stockholm, Sweden.
Source
Am J Hypertens. 2014 Mar;27(3):363-71
Date
Mar-2014
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aged
Area Under Curve
Biological Markers - blood
Blood pressure
Blood Pressure Monitoring, Ambulatory
C-Reactive Protein - metabolism
Chi-Square Distribution
Cystatin C - blood
Disease Progression
Disease-Free Survival
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Multivariate Analysis
Myocardial Infarction - etiology - mortality
Myocardial Revascularization
Natriuretic Peptide, Brain - blood
Patient Admission
Peptide Fragments - blood
Peripheral Arterial Disease - blood - complications - diagnosis - mortality - physiopathology
Predictive value of tests
Proportional Hazards Models
ROC Curve
Risk assessment
Risk factors
Sex Factors
Stroke - etiology - mortality
Sweden
Time Factors
Abstract
Patients with peripheral arterial disease (PAD) are at high risk for cardiovascular (CV) events. We have previously shown that ambulatory pulse pressure (APP) predicts CV events in PAD patients. The biomarkers amino-terminal pro-B-type natriuretic peptide (NT-proBNP), high-sensitivity C-reactive protein (hs-CRP), and cystatin C are related to a worse outcome in patients with CV disease, but their predictive values have not been studied in relation to APP.
Blood samples and 24-hour measurements of ambulatory blood pressure were examined in 98 men referred for PAD evaluation during 1998-2001. Patients were followed for a median of 71 months. The outcome variable was CV events defined as either CV mortality or any hospitalization for myocardial infarction, stroke, or coronary revascularization. The predictive values of log(NT-proBNP), log(hs-CRP), and log(cystatin C) alone and together with APP were assessed by multivariable Cox regression. Area under the curve (AUC) and net reclassification improvement (NRI) were calculated compared with a model containing other significant risk factors.
During follow-up, 36 patients had at least 1 CV event. APP, log(NT-proBNP), and log(hs-CRP) all predicted CV events in univariable analysis, whereas log(cystatin C) did not. In multivariable analysis log(NT-proBNP) (hazard ratio (HR) = 1.62; 95% confidence interval (CI) = 1.05-2.51) and log(hs-CRP) (HR = 1.63; 95% CI = 1.19-2.24) predicted events independently of 24-hour PP. The combination of log(NT-proBNP), log(hs-CRP), and average day PP improved risk discrimination (AUC = 0.833 vs. 0.736; P
PubMed ID
24470529 View in PubMed
Less detail

Angiographic and clinical outcomes of drug-eluting versus bare metal stent deployment in the Occluded Artery Trial.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature151893
Source
Catheter Cardiovasc Interv. 2009 May 1;73(6):771-9
Publication Type
Article
Date
May-1-2009
Author
Vladimír Dzavík
Christopher E Buller
Gerard Devlin
Ronald G Carere
G B John Mancini
Warren J Cantor
Pawel E Buszman
James M Rankin
Carlos Vozzi
John R Ross
Sandra Forman
Bruce A Barton
A Gervasio A Lamas
Judith S Hochman
Author Affiliation
Division of Cardiology, Peter Munk Cardiac Centre, University Health Network, Toronto, Ontario, Canada.
Source
Catheter Cardiovasc Interv. 2009 May 1;73(6):771-9
Date
May-1-2009
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Aged
Angina Pectoris - etiology
Angioplasty, Balloon, Coronary - adverse effects - instrumentation - mortality
Canada
Coronary Angiography
Coronary Occlusion - mortality - physiopathology - radiography - therapy
Coronary Restenosis - etiology - mortality - physiopathology - radiography
Drug-Eluting Stents
Female
Heart Failure - etiology
Humans
Kaplan-Meier Estimate
Logistic Models
Male
Metals
Middle Aged
Myocardial Infarction - etiology
Platelet Aggregation Inhibitors - therapeutic use
Prospective Studies
Prosthesis Design
Risk assessment
Stents
Stroke Volume
Time Factors
Treatment Outcome
Ventricular Function, Left
Abstract
The majority of patients randomized to percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI) in the Occluded Artery Trial (OAT) and its angiographic substudy, the Total Occlusion Study of Canada 2 (TOSCA-2) were treated with bare metal stents (BMS). We aimed to determine if stenting of the target occlusion in OAT with drug-eluting stents (DES) was associated with more favorable angiographic results and clinical outcome when compared with treatment with BMS.
TOSCA-2 DES was a prospective nonrandomized substudy that provided 1-year angiographic comparison of late loss and reocclusion in 25 patients treated with DES and in 128 treated with BMS. In addition, all PCI-assigned patients enrolled from the time when DES were first utilized were similarly categorized (DES n = 77, and BMS n = 386) and compared using the 3-year cumulative OAT primary combined endpoint of death, myocardial infarction, or Class-IV heart failure, as well as angina.
In-segment late loss was 0.14 +/- 0.45 mm for DES and 0.75 +/- 0.86 mm for BMS (P
Notes
Cites: J Am Coll Cardiol. 2006 Jan 17;47(2):449-5516412876
Cites: Am Heart J. 2005 Oct;150(4):627-4216209957
Cites: Circulation. 2007 May 1;115(17):2352-717470710
Cites: J Am Coll Cardiol. 2007 Jul 10;50(2):119-2717616295
Cites: Lancet. 2007 Sep 15;370(9591):937-4817869634
Cites: N Engl J Med. 2007 Oct 4;357(14):1393-40217914040
Cites: N Engl J Med. 2006 Dec 7;355(23):2395-40717105759
Cites: Circulation. 2006 Dec 5;114(23):2449-5717105848
Cites: Circulation. 2006 Aug 29;114(9):921-816908768
Cites: Lancet. 2001 Aug 18;358(9281):527-3311520521
Cites: J Am Coll Cardiol. 2002 Sep 4;40(5):869-7612225709
Cites: Br J Cancer. 1977 Jan;35(1):1-39831755
Cites: J Am Coll Cardiol. 1985 Mar;5(3):587-923156171
Cites: Biometrics. 1986 Mar;42(1):121-303719049
Cites: Circulation. 1986 Aug;74(2):293-3053731420
Cites: Circulation. 1987 Jul;76(1):142-543109764
Cites: J Am Coll Cardiol. 1996 Nov 15;28(6):1444-518917256
Cites: J Am Coll Cardiol. 1998 Jul;32(1):90-69669254
Cites: Eur Heart J. 2004 Dec;25(24):2187-9415589635
Comment In: Catheter Cardiovasc Interv. 2009 May 1;73(6):78019370758
PubMed ID
19309733 View in PubMed
Less detail

220 records – page 1 of 22.