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195 records – page 1 of 20.

[6-year trial of a program for predicting the potential occurrence of myocardial infarct].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature234833
Source
Kardiologiia. 1987 Sep;27(9):43-7
Publication Type
Article
Date
Sep-1987
Author
E Sh Khalfen
I L Shvarts
Source
Kardiologiia. 1987 Sep;27(9):43-7
Date
Sep-1987
Language
Russian
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Age Factors
Aged
Female
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Myocardial Infarction - epidemiology - etiology
Prognosis
Risk factors
Russia
Sex Factors
Software
Urban Population
Abstract
A six-year prospective study of 3775 individuals, first examined in 1978, using an original mathematical program of myocardial infarction risk prognosis, is reported. The program is based on an integral assessment of 19 risk factors, each having 4 degrees of severity. The subjects were allocated to one of 3 groups, depending on the prognostic risk score. In the low coronary risk group (2068 people), there was 1 (0.048%) myocardial infarction over 6 years. There were 12 (0.76%) infarctions in the medium risk group (1569 people), and 62 (44.92%) infarctions in the high risk group (138 people). Therefore, the program is capable of identifying a limited (about 4%) population that is going to develop 80% of all myocardial infarctions within the next 5 or 6 years.
PubMed ID
2961917 View in PubMed
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[Abdominal aortic aneurysm and the risk of stroke and myocardial infarction].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature114769
Source
Ugeskr Laeger. 2013 Mar 18;175(12):799
Publication Type
Article
Date
Mar-18-2013

The absolute risk of recurrent myocardial infarction is similar amongst both sexes: MONICA Iceland Study 1981-1999.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature51997
Source
Eur J Cardiovasc Prev Rehabil. 2004 Apr;11(2):121-4
Publication Type
Article
Date
Apr-2004
Author
Gunnar Sigurdsson
Nikulas Sigfusson
Inga Ingibjörg Gudmundsdottir
Uggi Agnarsson
Helgi Sigvaldason
Vilmundur Gudnason
Author Affiliation
Icelandic Heart Association, and Department of Internal Medicine, Landspitali University Hospital, Reykjavik, Iceland. gunnars@lanspital.is
Source
Eur J Cardiovasc Prev Rehabil. 2004 Apr;11(2):121-4
Date
Apr-2004
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Aged
Comparative Study
Female
Humans
Iceland - epidemiology
Incidence
Male
Middle Aged
Myocardial Infarction - epidemiology - etiology
Recurrence
Risk assessment
Sex Factors
Time Factors
Abstract
BACKGROUND: To do a gender comparison of absolute risk of recurrent myocardial infarction (MI). DESIGN: Registration of all first and second MI amongst Icelandic males and females 1981-1999. METHODS: The whole of Icelandic population, 40-74 years of age. RESULTS: The mean recurrence rate (second attack) for men was 45.7/1000 MI survivors/year and for women 39.0/1000 per year. The male/female (M/F) ratio was 1.17, 95% confidence interval 1.00-1.37, P = 0.05 and did not change significantly with age. The M/F ratio for first MI in comparison was two to seven, lowest in the oldest group. The recurrence rate decreased significantly and similarly in both sexes during the observation period. CONCLUSION: The absolute risk of MI is closely similar amongst both sexes and has decreased similarly suggesting that the same kind of secondary intervention is effective amongst both sexes in a general population.
PubMed ID
15187815 View in PubMed
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Active and passive smoking and the risk of myocardial infarction in 24,968 men and women during 11 year of follow-up: the Tromsø Study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature116011
Source
Eur J Epidemiol. 2013 Aug;28(8):659-67
Publication Type
Article
Date
Aug-2013
Author
Birgitte Iversen
Bjarne K Jacobsen
Maja-Lisa Løchen
Author Affiliation
Department of Community Medicine, Faculty of Health Sciences, University of Tromsø, 9037, Tromsø, Norway.
Source
Eur J Epidemiol. 2013 Aug;28(8):659-67
Date
Aug-2013
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Body mass index
Cholesterol - blood
Female
Follow-Up Studies
Hospitalization - statistics & numerical data
Humans
Incidence
Male
Middle Aged
Myocardial Infarction - epidemiology - etiology
Norway - epidemiology
Population Surveillance
Proportional Hazards Models
Prospective Studies
Questionnaires
Risk assessment
Risk factors
Sex Factors
Smoking - adverse effects - epidemiology
Tobacco Smoke Pollution - adverse effects
Abstract
Active smoking is a well-established risk factor for myocardial infarction, but less is known about the impact of passive smoking, and possible sex differences in risk related to passive smoking. We investigated active and passive smoking as risk factors for myocardial infarction in an 11-year follow-up of 11,762 men and 13,206 women included in the Tromsø Study. There were a total of 769 and 453 incident cases of myocardial infarction in men and women, respectively. We found linear age-adjusted relationships between both active and passive smoking and myocardial infarction incidence in both sexes. The relationships seem to be stronger for women than for men. Age-adjusted analyses indicated a stronger relationship with passive smoking in ever-smokers than in never-smokers. After adjustment for important confounders (body mass index, blood pressure, total cholesterol, HDL cholesterol and physical activity) the associations with active and passive smoking were still statistically significant. Adjusting for active smoking when assessing the effect of passive smoking and vice versa, indicated that the effect of passive smoking in men may be explained by their own active smoking. In women, living with a smoker =30 years after the age of 20 increased the myocardial infarction risk by 40 %, even after adjusting for active smoking. Passive smoking is a risk factor for myocardial infarction on its own, but whereas the effect for men seems to be explained by their own active smoking, the effect in females remains statistically significant.
Notes
Cites: Eur J Prev Cardiol. 2012 Oct;19(5):927-3421859780
Cites: BMC Med Res Methodol. 2012;12:14322978749
Cites: Prog Cardiovasc Dis. 2003 Jul-Aug;46(1):11-2912920698
Cites: J Clin Endocrinol Metab. 2004 Jun;89(6):2745-915181052
Cites: BMJ. 2004 Jul 24;329(7459):200-515229131
Cites: Am J Public Health. 1980 Apr;70(4):420-27361965
Cites: Circulation. 1996 Feb 1;93(3):450-68565161
Cites: J Clin Epidemiol. 1997 Apr;50(4):475-99179106
Cites: Heart. 2010 Jun;96(11):854-920478864
Cites: Maturitas. 2010 Feb;65(2):149-6019897327
Cites: Lancet. 2006 Aug 19;368(9536):647-5816920470
Cites: N Engl J Med. 2005 Mar 24;352(12):1223-3615788499
Cites: Int J Epidemiol. 2012 Aug;41(4):961-721422063
Cites: Eur J Cardiovasc Prev Rehabil. 2011 Jun;18(3):467-7421450650
Cites: Lancet. 2011 Oct 8;378(9799):1297-30521839503
Cites: Am J Epidemiol. 2010 Dec 1;172(11):1306-1420843863
Cites: Tidsskr Nor Laegeforen. 1998 May 30;118(14):2165-89656812
Cites: N Engl J Med. 1999 Mar 25;340(12):920-610089185
PubMed ID
23443581 View in PubMed
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[ACUTE CORONARY SYNDROME WITHOUT ST SEGMENT ELEVATION: POSSIBILITIES FOR PREDICTING THE CLINICAL COURSE AT THE POST-HOSPITAL (6 AND 12 MONTHS) STAGE].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature275680
Source
Klin Med (Mosk). 2016;94(3):205-10
Publication Type
Article
Date
2016
Source
Klin Med (Mosk). 2016;94(3):205-10
Date
2016
Language
Russian
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Acute Coronary Syndrome - complications - diagnosis - metabolism - mortality
Aged
Calcium - blood
Creatinine - blood
Electrocardiography
Female
Follow-Up Studies
Humans
Interleukin-10 - blood
Interleukin-6 - blood
Male
Melatonin - analogs & derivatives - urine
Middle Aged
Myocardial Infarction - epidemiology - etiology
Potassium - blood
Predictive value of tests
Prognosis
Risk assessment
Russia - epidemiology
Sodium - metabolism
Abstract
To measure blood IL-6, IL-10, creatinine levels, calcium, sodium and potassium in blood and saliva, melatonin in urine of patients with acute coronary syndrome without ST segment elevation for the prediction of the clinical course at the post-hospital stage.
The study included 93 patients with complicated (n = 46) and uncomplicated (n = 47) coronary syndrome without ST segment elevation. Blood IL-6, IL-1, creatinine levels, calcium, sodium and potassium in blood and saliva, melatoni n in urine were determined on days 1-3 after hospitalization. 6-hydroxymelatonin was measured by HPLC in urine collected between 23 p.m. and 8 a.m., melatonin i in urine collected between 8 a.m. and 23 p.m.
Complicated coronary syndrome was associated with increased levels of melatonin (night), blood IL-10 and Na, salivary, Na and Ca while the uncomplicated condition with increased blood melatonin (daytime), IL-6, creatinine, Ca, Na, K, and salivary K. 90 patients were followed up within 12 months after discharge. End-points developed in 36 (40%) of them. Logistic analysis yielded variables and 2 logistic regression equations The data on night melatonin +5 and +4 were included in ROC analysis. The night melatonin +5 values over 0.7453 were associated with increased risk of complications in the post-hospital period (6 months) and values of 0.7453 or lower with the enhanced probability of uncomplicated clinical course. Prognostic sensitivity was estimated at 90%, specificity at -54.39%. The night melatonin +4 values over 0.2903 were associated with increased risk of complications in the post-hospital period (12 months) and values of 0.2903 or lower with the enhanced probability of uncomplicated clinical course. Prognostic sensitivity was estimated at 77.8%, specificity at -59.26%.
The night melatonin +5 and +4 models can be used to predict the clinical course of acute coronary syndrome during 6 and 12 months of the post-hospitalization period.
PubMed ID
27522726 View in PubMed
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Acute myocardial infarction after manual or automated snow removal.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature53923
Source
Am J Cardiol. 2001 Jun 1;87(11):1282-3
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-1-2001
Author
B A Franklin
P. George
R. Henry
S. Gordon
G C Timmis
W W O'Neill
Author Affiliation
Department of Medicine, Division of Cardiology (Cardiac Rehabilitation), William Beaumont Hospital, Royal Oak, Michigan, USA. bfranklin@beaumont.edu
Source
Am J Cardiol. 2001 Jun 1;87(11):1282-3
Date
Jun-1-2001
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aged
Cold Climate
Comparative Study
Cross-Sectional Studies
Exertion
Humans
Male
Michigan - epidemiology
Middle Aged
Myocardial Infarction - epidemiology - etiology
Risk factors
Snow
PubMed ID
11377355 View in PubMed
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Acute myocardial infarction in patients treated for hypertension in the Skaraborg Hypertension Project.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature55030
Source
Eur Heart J. 1993 Mar;14(3):291-6
Publication Type
Article
Date
Mar-1993
Author
U. Lindblad
L. Råstam
J. Ranstam
Author Affiliation
Department of Community Health Sciences, University of Lund, Malmö, Sweden.
Source
Eur Heart J. 1993 Mar;14(3):291-6
Date
Mar-1993
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adrenergic beta-Antagonists - therapeutic use
Adult
Aged
Benzothiadiazines
Case-Control Studies
Diuretics
Drug Therapy, Combination
Female
Follow-Up Studies
Humans
Hydralazine - therapeutic use
Hypertension - complications - drug therapy
Incidence
Life tables
Male
Middle Aged
Myocardial Infarction - epidemiology - etiology - mortality
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Risk factors
Sodium Chloride Symporter Inhibitors - therapeutic use
Survival Rate
Sweden - epidemiology
Abstract
The Skaraborg Hypertension Project was undertaken in 1977-1981, and 1428 male and 1812 female hypertensives aged 40-69 years were involved at hypertension out-patient clinics in primary health care. Their long-term risk of acute myocardial infarction during a follow-up of 8.3 years was compared to that of age- and sex-matched controls drawn from the census register at the beginning of surveillance and to normotensive untreated controls identified in a population survey in 1977. Relative risks (with a 95% confidence interval) for acute myocardial infarction morbidity compared to the population was 0.99 (0.78, 1.25) in men and 1.36 (0.95, 1.94) in women. Corresponding figures for acute myocardial infarction mortality were 0.97 (0.68, 1.38) and 1.15 (0.67, 1.99). With normotensive controls used as reference and adjusting for smoking habits and body mass index, the relative risks for acute myocardial infarction morbidity were 1.48 (1.12, 1.98) in men and 2.34 (1.43, 3.85) in women, and for acute myocardial infarction mortality 1.66 (1.07, 2.57) and 1.71 (0.84, 3.48), respectively. Treated hypertension is a weak risk factor for acute myocardial infarction in unselected hypertensive patients.
PubMed ID
8096178 View in PubMed
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Alcohol consumption, drinking pattern and acute myocardial infarction. A case referent study based on the Swedish Twin Register.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature11096
Source
J Intern Med. 1997 Feb;241(2):125-31
Publication Type
Article
Date
Feb-1997
Author
N. Hammar
A. Romelsjö
L. Alfredsson
Author Affiliation
Division of Epidemiology, Karolinska Institutet, Sweden.
Source
J Intern Med. 1997 Feb;241(2):125-31
Date
Feb-1997
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Alcohol Drinking
Case-Control Studies
Confounding Factors (Epidemiology)
Female
Humans
Incidence
Male
Myocardial Infarction - epidemiology - etiology
Prospective Studies
Registries
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Risk
Sweden - epidemiology
Twins
Abstract
OBJECTIVES: Little is known about the possible influence of different kinds of alcohol drinking pattern on the risk of acute myocardial infarction. In this study the association between average daily alcohol consumption, as well as large intakes of alcohol on single occasions, and myocardial infarction incidence was investigated. DESIGN: A case referent analysis nested within a prospective cohort study. SETTING: Incident cases of myocardial infarction were identified by using hospital discharge data and deaths. Referents were selected from the study population through a stratified random sample. SUBJECTS: Individuals of the Swedish Twin Register below 75 years of age living in a region of 10 Swedish counties in 1972-1981 or in Stockholm County in 1972-1987. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURE: Incidence of acute myocardial infarction. RESULTS: No difference in myocardial infarction incidence was found between former alcohol drinkers and lifelong abstainers. For men, drinkers had a 40% lower incidence than non-drinkers, as did those with a drinking pattern involving a large intake on single occasions. Women had on average a very low level of alcohol consumption and there were only small differences in incidence of myocardial infarction between drinkers and non-drinkers. An increased incidence was indicated for women reporting some-times drinking comparatively large amounts of alcohol on single occasions. CONCLUSIONS: The results support the suggestion that low and moderate alcohol consumption is protective for myocardial infarction. A drinking pattern involving a large intake of alcohol on single occasions did not seem to substantially influence myocardial infarction incidence except possibly for women with an overall very low level of consumption.
PubMed ID
9077369 View in PubMed
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Alcoholic registration and cardiovascular morbidity and mortality--a prospective study in middle aged Swedish men.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature55591
Source
Acta Med Scand Suppl. 1987;717:87-92
Publication Type
Article
Date
1987
Author
A. Rosengren
L. Wilhelmsen
Author Affiliation
Department of Medicine, Ostra Hospital, Gothenburg, Sweden.
Source
Acta Med Scand Suppl. 1987;717:87-92
Date
1987
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Alcoholism - complications
Death, Sudden - epidemiology - etiology
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Myocardial Infarction - epidemiology - etiology
Prospective Studies
Registries
Sweden
Abstract
The consequences of alcoholic intemperance and economic problems on CHD mortality and morbidity were studied among the participants in a large primary preventive trial. Official register data were used. Subjects registered with the Board of Social Welfare were categorised with respect to increasing load of alcoholic intemperance. Non-fatal CHD was not related to alcoholic problems. Fatal CHD, on the other hand, was strongly associated with registration for intemperance. This was especially pronounced for cases dying suddenly from CHD. A multivariate analysis was performed, controlling for smoking, systolic blood pressure and serum cholesterol, which showed that the association between intemperance and fatal CHD was independent of these factors.
PubMed ID
3478974 View in PubMed
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Androgen-deprivation therapy in treatment of prostate cancer and risk of myocardial infarction and stroke: a nationwide Danish population-based cohort study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature116108
Source
Eur Urol. 2014 Apr;65(4):704-9
Publication Type
Article
Date
Apr-2014
Author
Christina G Jespersen
Mette Nørgaard
Michael Borre
Author Affiliation
Department of Urology, Aarhus University Hospital, Aarhus, Denmark; Institute of Clinical Medicine, Aarhus University Hospital, Aarhus, Denmark. Electronic address: christina.gade@ki.au.dk.
Source
Eur Urol. 2014 Apr;65(4):704-9
Date
Apr-2014
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aged
Androgen Antagonists - adverse effects
Cohort Studies
Denmark
Gonadotropin-Releasing Hormone - adverse effects
Humans
Male
Myocardial Infarction - epidemiology - etiology
Orchiectomy - adverse effects
Prostatic Neoplasms - therapy
Risk assessment
Stroke - epidemiology - etiology
Abstract
Androgen-deprivation therapy (ADT) has been suggested to increase the risk for cardiovascular diseases, including myocardial infarction (MI) and stroke, but data are inconsistent.
To investigate the association between ADT and risk for MI and stroke in Danish men with prostate cancer.
A national cohort study of all patients with incident prostate cancer registered in the Danish Cancer Registry from January 1, 2002, through 2010 was conducted.
We used Cox regression analysis to estimate hazard ratios (HR) of MI and stroke for ADT users versus nonusers, adjusting for age, prostate cancer stage, comorbidity, and calendar period. Additionally, we stratified the analysis on preexisting MI/stroke status.
Of 31,571 prostate cancer patients, 9204 (29%) received medical endocrine therapy and 2060 (7%) were orchidectomized. Patients treated with medical endocrine therapy had an increased risk for MI and stroke with adjusted HRs of 1.31 (95% confidence interval [CI], 1.16-1.49) and 1.19 (95% CI, 1.06-1.35), respectively, compared with nonusers of ADT. We found no increased risk for MI (HR: 0.90; 95% CI, 0.83-1.29) or stroke (HR: 1.11; 95% CI, 0.90-1.36) after orchiectomy. One limitation of the study is that information on prognostic lifestyle factors was not included and might have further informed our estimates.
In this nationwide cohort study of >30 000 prostate cancer patients, we found that endocrine hormonal therapy was associated with increased risk for MI and stroke. In contrast, we did not find this association after orchiectomy.
Notes
Comment In: Eur Urol. 2014 Apr;65(4):710-223498063
Comment In: Eur Urol. 2013 Sep;64(3):e59-6023623050
PubMed ID
23433805 View in PubMed
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195 records – page 1 of 20.