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Are there socio-economic differences in survival after acute myocardial infarction?

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature54604
Source
Eur Heart J. 1996 Nov;17(11):1619-23
Publication Type
Article
Date
Nov-1996

Return to work after first myocardial infarction in 1991-1996 in Finland.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature177416
Source
Eur J Public Health. 2004 Dec;14(4):350-3
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-2004
Author
Helena Hämäläinen
Juhani Mäki
Lauri Virta
Ilmo Keskimäki
Markku Mähönen
Vladislav Moltchanov
Veikko Salomaa
Author Affiliation
Social Insurance Institution, Research Department, Turku, Finland.
Source
Eur J Public Health. 2004 Dec;14(4):350-3
Date
Dec-2004
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Age Distribution
Cause of Death
Employment - statistics & numerical data
Female
Finland - epidemiology
Humans
Insurance, Disability - utilization
Male
Middle Aged
Myocardial Infarction - economics - epidemiology - mortality
Pensions - statistics & numerical data
Registries
Retirement - economics - statistics & numerical data
Sex Distribution
Sick Leave - statistics & numerical data
Social Security - utilization
Abstract
A substantial number of myocardial infarctions (MI) occur at working age. It is, however, insufficiently well known how many of these patients return to work after their MI.
Sources of information were the Hospital Discharge Register, the Causes of Death Register and the registers for social security benefits. Availability for the labour market was used as the return to work criterion. Altogether 10,244 persons (8,733 men, 1,511 women) aged 35-59 years had their first MI or coronary death during 1991-1994 in Finland. Persons who survived for 28 days and were not on pension at the time of MI were included in a two-year follow-up.
Twenty-nine per cent of patients were already pensioned at the time of their first MI. Of the patients not pensioned at the time of their MI, 4,929 were alive two years after the event. Of them, 38% of men and 40% of women received disability pension, 3% of both genders were on sick leave and 1% of both genders were on unemployment pension. The remainder, 58% of men and 56% of women, did not receive any of these benefits, thus, being available to the labour force.
Nearly one-third of persons having their first MI at working age were already out of the labour force at the time of their MI. Of those who were not pensioned and who survived the event, slightly more than half were available to the labour market two years later.
PubMed ID
15542868 View in PubMed
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