Skip header and navigation

Refine By

68 records – page 1 of 7.

[10-year mortality of patients admitted to coronary units with or without confirmed diagnosis of myocardial infarction. A relation to anamnesis and diagnosis at discharge]

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature48374
Source
Ugeskr Laeger. 1995 Jul 3;157(27):3894-7
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jul-3-1995
Author
J. Launbjerg
P. Fruergaard
J K Madsen
L S Mortensen
J F Hansen
Author Affiliation
Medicinsk afdeling B, Hillerød Sygehus.
Source
Ugeskr Laeger. 1995 Jul 3;157(27):3894-7
Date
Jul-3-1995
Language
Danish
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Aged
Coronary Care Units - statistics & numerical data
Denmark - epidemiology
English Abstract
Female
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Myocardial Infarction - diagnosis - drug therapy - mortality
Patient Admission
Patient Discharge
Prognosis
Risk factors
Time Factors
Verapamil - therapeutic use
Abstract
The ten-year mortality in patients with suspected myocardial infarction with (AMI) and without (non-AMI) confirmed diagnosis was evaluated in 1897 non-AMI patients and 1401 AMI patients who were consecutively admitted to hospital during The Danish Verapamil Infarction Study. The following risk factors contained independent prognostic information about mortality for non-AMI patients: age, previous AMI, sex and diabetes. In patients with AMI the risk factors were: age, previous AMI, clinical heart failure, diabetes and angina pectoris. When the diagnosis at discharge for non-AMI patients was included in the Cox-analysis, only the diagnoses of bronchopneumonia, musculoskeletal disorders and observation only of added prognostic information. We conclude that non-AMI patients are at high risk for mortal events in the long-term. High risk patients can be identified from the medical history and should be carefully evaluated regarding coronary artery disease at the time of discharge in order to improve the risk stratification, treatment and prognosis.
PubMed ID
7645063 View in PubMed
Less detail

Age-related differences in in-hospital mortality and the use of thrombolytic therapy for acute myocardial infarction.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature194746
Source
CMAJ. 2001 May 1;164(9):1285-90
Publication Type
Article
Date
May-1-2001
Author
J M Boucher
N. Racine
T H Thanh
E. Rahme
J. Brophy
J. LeLorier
P. Théroux
Author Affiliation
Département de Médecine, Centre Hospitalier de l'Université de Montréal, Université de Montréal, Montreal, Que.
Source
CMAJ. 2001 May 1;164(9):1285-90
Date
May-1-2001
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Age Distribution
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Analysis of Variance
Comorbidity
Confounding Factors (Epidemiology)
Drug Utilization
Electrocardiography
Female
Guideline Adherence - statistics & numerical data
Hospital Mortality
Humans
Logistic Models
Male
Middle Aged
Myocardial Infarction - diagnosis - drug therapy - etiology - mortality
Patient Selection
Physician's Practice Patterns - statistics & numerical data
Practice Guidelines as Topic
Predictive value of tests
Prospective Studies
Quebec - epidemiology
Registries
Risk factors
Thrombolytic Therapy - utilization
Abstract
Recent guidelines have acknowledged that thrombolysis decreases mortality from acute myocardial infarction (AMI) independently of age. The purpose of this study was to determine the age-related rates of thrombolytic administration and in-hospital mortality and the variables related to the use of thrombolytic therapy for patients with AMI.
A prospective cohort analysis involved a registry of 44 acute care Quebec hospitals that enrolled 3741 patients with AMI between January 1995 and May 1996. The main outcomes of interest were crude and adjusted age-related in-hospital mortality rates and rates of use of thrombolytic therapy.
In-hospital mortality rates increased dramatically with age from 2.1% in patients with AMI who were less than 55 years of age to 26.3% in those who were 85 years of age or older. Overall, 35.8% of the patients received thrombolysis. There was a pronounced inverse gradient in the use of thrombolysis with age, ranging from 46.2% in the youngest age group ( or = 85 years). After adjustment for potential confounders, the older patients remained significantly less likely to receive thrombolytic therapy. Compared with patients who were less than 55 years of age, the odds ratio of receiving thrombolytic therapy was 0.68 (95% confidence interval [CI] 0.52-0.89) for patients aged 65-74 years, 0.48 (95% CI 0.35-0.65) for patients aged 75-84 years and 0.13 (95% CI 0.06-0.26) for patients aged 85 years or more. Other variables related to thrombolytic therapy were diabetes (odds ratio [OR] 0.77, 95% CI 0.59-1.00), cerebrovascular disease (OR 0.46, 95% CI 0.30-0.72), angina (OR 0.73, 95% CI 0.56-0.95), typical chest pain (OR 2.56, 95% CI 1.88-3.47); ST elevation (OR 8.93, 95% CI 7.24-11.00), Q wave MI (OR 5.26, 95% CI 4.20-6.60) and increased length of time between onset of symptoms and arrival at hospital.
Age is an important independent predictor of in-hospital mortality and lower thrombolytic use following AMI. Other studies are required to further evaluate the appropriateness of thrombolytic therapy for elderly patients.
Notes
Cites: Arch Intern Med. 1994 May 23;154(10):1090-68185422
Cites: Lancet. 1994 Feb 5;343(8893):311-227905143
Cites: Can J Cardiol. 1994 Jun;10(5):522-98012880
Cites: Arch Intern Med. 1994 Oct 10;154(19):2202-87944841
Cites: Ann Intern Med. 1996 Feb 1;124(3):283-918554222
Cites: J Am Coll Cardiol. 1996 Nov 1;28(5):1328-4288890834
Cites: N Engl J Med. 1997 Mar 20;336(12):847-609062095
Cites: Arch Intern Med. 1997 Apr 14;157(7):741-69125005
Cites: JAMA. 1997 Jun 4;277(21):1683-89169894
Cites: Ann Intern Med. 1997 Oct 1;127(7):538-569313022
Cites: CMAJ. 1998 Feb 24;158(4):475-809627559
Cites: Circulation. 1999 Aug 31;100(9):1016-3010468535
Cites: Can J Cardiol. 1994 Jun;10(5):517-218012879
Cites: Circulation. 2000 May 16;101(19):2239-4610811589
Cites: N Engl J Med. 1986 Jun 5;314(23):1465-712871492
Cites: Lancet. 1988 Mar 12;1(8585):545-92894490
Cites: Lancet. 1988 Aug 13;2(8607):349-602899772
Cites: Lancet. 1988 Sep 3;2(8610):525-302900919
Cites: Lancet. 1990 Jul 14;336(8707):65-711975321
Cites: Ann Intern Med. 1990 Dec 15;113(12):949-602240919
Cites: JAMA. 1991 Jul 24-31;266(4):528-322061979
Cites: Lancet. 1992 Mar 28;339(8796):753-701347801
Cites: JAMA. 1992 Nov 11;268(18):2530-61404820
Cites: Ann Intern Med. 1993 Feb 1;118(3):201-108417638
Cites: N Engl J Med. 1993 Mar 18;328(11):779-848123063
Cites: N Engl J Med. 1993 Nov 11;329(20):1442-88413454
Comment In: CMAJ. 2001 May 1;164(9):1301-311341140
PubMed ID
11341137 View in PubMed
Less detail

[Ambulance transportation and prehospital treatment in connection with admission for suspected acute myocardial infarction]

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature53765
Source
Ugeskr Laeger. 2002 Mar 11;164(11):1493-6
Publication Type
Article
Date
Mar-11-2002
Author
Claus-Henrik Rasmussen
Anders P Munck
Torben H Haghfelt
Jakob Kragstrup
Author Affiliation
Syddansk Universiteit, Forskningsenheden for Almen Medicin i Odense, Odense Universitetshospital, Kardiologisk Forskningsenhed.
Source
Ugeskr Laeger. 2002 Mar 11;164(11):1493-6
Date
Mar-11-2002
Language
Danish
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Ambulances - standards - utilization
Denmark
Emergency Medical Services - standards - utilization
English Abstract
Hospitals, University
Humans
Myocardial Infarction - diagnosis - drug therapy - therapy
Patient Admission
Physician's Practice Patterns
Quality of Health Care
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Time and Motion Studies
Abstract
INTRODUCTION: The aim was to describe ambulance transportation and pre-hospital treatment in connection with admission for suspected acute myocardial infarction. MATERIAL AND METHODS: For all patients with suspected acute coronary syndrome who were urgently admitted to the Cardiological Department, Odense University Hospital between 3 August 1998 and 6 December 1998, information about ambulance transportation and pre-hospital treatment was collected through interviews with the patients and study of ambulance records, admission notes, and hospital medical records. In addition, details of the regarding response times were obtained from Falck's emergency service and from nurses' papers. RESULTS: Altogether 279 patients (83%) were transported by ambulance. Half the ambulances arrived at the hospital after 34 minutes (range 11-140 minutes), but every third ambulance took more than 40 minutes to reach the hospital. The pre-hospital treatment of all the patients was: oxygen 69%, nitroglycerin sublingually 46%, nitrous oxide 2%, defibrillation 1.4%, acetylsalicylic acid 9%, morphine injection 8%, and ECG monitoring 57%. CONCLUSION: The study showed that there were quality problems, as every third ambulance took more than 40 minutes to reach the hospital. It also showed that acetylsalicylic acid and morphine were used only to a limited extent in a pre-hospital situation.
PubMed ID
11924473 View in PubMed
Less detail

Angiotensin-converting enzyme (ACE) inhibitor therapy after myocardial infarction in relation to left ventricular function.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature53513
Source
Scand Cardiovasc J. 2003 Jun;37(3):130-4
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-2003
Author
Aasmund Reikvam
Elena Kvan
Knud Landmark
Ivar Aursnes
Author Affiliation
Department of Pharmacotherapeutics, Faculty of Medicine, University of Oslo, Norway. asmund.reikvam@labmed.uio.no
Source
Scand Cardiovasc J. 2003 Jun;37(3):130-4
Date
Jun-2003
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Angiotensin-Converting Enzyme Inhibitors - administration & dosage
Cohort Studies
Confidence Intervals
Dose-Response Relationship, Drug
Drug Administration Schedule
Emergency Treatment
Female
Heart Function Tests
Hemodynamic Processes - physiology
Humans
Logistic Models
Male
Middle Aged
Myocardial Infarction - diagnosis - drug therapy - mortality
Norway
Probability
Prognosis
Sampling Studies
Severity of Illness Index
Stroke Volume - drug effects
Survival Rate
Treatment Outcome
Ventricular Dysfunction, Left - drug therapy - physiopathology
Ventricular Function, Left - drug effects
Abstract
OBJECTIVE: To investigate to what extent and by what methods clinicians assess left ventricular (LV) function after an acute myocardial infarction (AMI) and how the results of the assessments relate to the use of angiotensin-converting enzyme (ACE) inhibitors; furthermore, to explore which main indications caused the clinicians to initiate ACE inhibitor therapy. DESIGN: From 16 hospitals we drew a sample of patients who were discharged with the diagnosis of AMI during a 3-month period in 1999/2000. Physicians in each hospital obtained the observed rate of use of cardiovascular drugs at discharge and also information on ejection fraction (EF) measurements. The results of the EF recordings were classified into three categories: >0.50, 0.40-0.50 and 0.50, 95 (24%) EF 0.40-0.50 and 87 (21%) EF 0.50. The main indication for starting ACE inhibitor therapy was heart failure (50%) followed by secondary prevention (42%). CONCLUSION: Measuring EF appears to be an important tool in the evaluation of AMI patients prior to discharge from hospital. Initiation of ACE inhibitor therapy related strongly to the results of the assessments.
Notes
Comment In: Scand Cardiovasc J. 2003 Jun;37(3):122-312881150
PubMed ID
12881153 View in PubMed
Less detail

Application of Lean Six Sigma for patients presenting with ST-elevation myocardial infarction: the Hamilton Health Sciences experience.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature170153
Source
Healthc Q. 2006;9(1):56-61, 2
Publication Type
Article
Date
2006
Author
Ayad Aldarrab
Author Affiliation
Royal College Residency Training Program, McMaster University, Hamilton, Ontario. Edarrab@hotmail.com
Source
Healthc Q. 2006;9(1):56-61, 2
Date
2006
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Benchmarking
Crowding
Electric Countershock - utilization
Electrocardiography - utilization
Emergency Service, Hospital - standards - utilization
Humans
Institutional Management Teams
Models, organizational
Myocardial Infarction - diagnosis - drug therapy
Ontario
Practice Guidelines as Topic
Process Assessment (Health Care)
Quality Assurance, Health Care
Software Design
Thrombolytic Therapy - utilization
Time Factors
Abstract
Most patients with symptomatic acute myocardial infarction (AMI), the leading cause of death in western industrialized nations, use the emergency department (ED) as their point of entry. Yet, one identified barrier to early recognition of patients with AMI is ED overcrowding. In this paper, the author presents a quality improvement model that applies Lean Six Sigma guidelines to the clinical setting.
Notes
Erratum In: Healthc Q. 2006;9(2):16
PubMed ID
16548435 View in PubMed
Less detail

Applying the new STEMI guidelines: 1. Reperfusion in acute ST-segment elevation myocardial infarction.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature177743
Source
CMAJ. 2004 Oct 26;171(9):1039-41
Publication Type
Article
Date
Oct-26-2004
Author
Peter Bogaty
Christopher E Buller
Paul Dorian
Blair J O'Neill
Paul W Armstrong
Author Affiliation
Quebec Heart Institute, Laval Hospital, Sainte-Foy.
Source
CMAJ. 2004 Oct 26;171(9):1039-41
Date
Oct-26-2004
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Anistreplase - administration & dosage
Canada
Dose-Response Relationship, Drug
Drug Administration Schedule
Drug Therapy, Combination
Electrocardiography
Female
Guideline Adherence
Humans
Infusions, Intravenous
Middle Aged
Myocardial Infarction - diagnosis - drug therapy
Myocardial Reperfusion - standards
Risk assessment
Severity of Illness Index
Streptokinase - therapeutic use
Thrombolytic Therapy - adverse effects - standards
Treatment Outcome
Notes
Cites: Lancet. 1996 Sep 21;348(9030):771-58813982
Cites: Circulation. 2004 Aug 3;110(5):588-63615289388
Cites: Lancet. 1988 Aug 13;2(8607):349-602899772
Cites: Can J Cardiol. 2004 Sep;20(11):1075-915457302
Comment In: CMAJ. 2005 May 24;172(11):1425-6; author reply 142615911844
Comment In: CMAJ. 2005 May 24;172(11):1425; author reply 142615911845
Erratum In: CMAJ. 2004 Nov 23;171(11):1327
PubMed ID
15505262 View in PubMed
Less detail

ß-blockers after myocardial infarction and 1-year clinical outcome - a retrospective study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature306303
Source
BMC Cardiovasc Disord. 2020 04 09; 20(1):165
Publication Type
Comparative Study
Journal Article
Observational Study
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Date
04-09-2020
Author
Tora Hagsund
Sven-Erik Olsson
J Gustav Smith
Bjarne Madsen Hardig
Henrik Wagner
Author Affiliation
Medical faculty, Lund University, 22242, Lund, Sweden.
Source
BMC Cardiovasc Disord. 2020 04 09; 20(1):165
Date
04-09-2020
Language
English
Publication Type
Comparative Study
Journal Article
Observational Study
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Keywords
Adrenergic beta-Antagonists - adverse effects - therapeutic use
Aged
Female
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Myocardial Infarction - diagnosis - drug therapy - mortality
Myocardial Revascularization
Patient Discharge
Patient Readmission
Recurrence
Registries
Retrospective Studies
Risk factors
Secondary Prevention
Sweden
Time Factors
Treatment Outcome
Abstract
Long term ß-blocker therapy after myocardial infarction (MI) reduces mortality and recurrent MI but evidence for this treatment predates contemporary acute coronary care. ß-blocker treatment is a key quality of care indicator in the Swedish national quality register for acute coronary care, Riks-HIA. Between 2011 and 2015 a declining number of MI-patients discharged with a ß-blocker from the coronary care unit (CCU) at Helsingborg and other hospitals was reported. This retrospective observational study aimed to investigate the causes for discharge without a ß-blocker and relate it to outcome, compared to patients discharged with a ß-blocker.
MI-patients registered in Riks-HIA discharged without ß-blocker during 2011-2015 (no-ß-group) and a control group (ß-group) comprised of patients discharged with ß-blocker treatment between January 1 to December 31, 2013, were matched by RIKS-HIA criteria for ß-blocker use. Clinical characteristics, date of death, readmission for MI, other cardiovascular events were collected from Riks-HIA and medical records.
The no-ß-group included 141 patients, where 65.2% had a justified reason for non-ß-blocker use. The ß-group included 206 patients. There was no difference in cardiovascular risk factor profile. There were a trend towards a higher number of readmissions for MI in the no-ß-group was (n?=?8 (5.7%) vs n?=?2 (1.0%), p?=?0.02), but not mortality (6 (4.3%) vs 2 (1.0%), p?=?0.07) and combined readmission for angina pectoris, heart failure, arrhythmias or stroke/TIA (n?=?23 (16.3%) vs n?=?25 (12.1%), p?=?0.27).
A majority of the patients in the no-ß-group had a justified absence of a ß-blocker. ß-blocker treatment post-MI showed a trend towards fewer readmissions for MI. But important quality information is lacking to make a firm conclusion of the effect on outcome.
PubMed ID
32272880 View in PubMed
Less detail

ß-Blockers in hypertension: studies and meta-analyses over the years.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature104465
Source
Can J Cardiol. 2014 May;30(5 Suppl):S16-22
Publication Type
Article
Date
May-2014
Author
Pierre Larochelle
Sheldon W Tobe
Yves Lacourcière
Author Affiliation
Institut de recherches cliniques de Montréal, Montréal, Québec, Canada. Electronic address: pierre.larochelle@ircm.qc.ca.
Source
Can J Cardiol. 2014 May;30(5 Suppl):S16-22
Date
May-2014
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adrenergic beta-Antagonists - administration & dosage
Age Factors
Antihypertensive Agents - administration & dosage
Canada
Cardiovascular Diseases - diagnosis - drug therapy
Evidence-Based Medicine
Female
Heart Failure - diagnosis - drug therapy
Humans
Hypertension - diagnosis - drug therapy
Male
Middle Aged
Myocardial Infarction - diagnosis - drug therapy
Practice Guidelines as Topic
Prognosis
Randomized Controlled Trials as Topic
Risk assessment
Treatment Outcome
Abstract
ß-Blockers are among the most commonly used medications in the treatment of hypertension. However, 45 years after their initial indication for that treatment, their place in the treatment of hypertensive patients is under evaluation and their usefulness has been questioned based on evidence from meta-analyses of clinical trials. The ß-blocker class consists of various agents with diverse pharmacokinetic and pharmacodynamic properties including lipo- and hydrophilicity, duration of action, intrinsic sympathomimetic activity, vasodilation, and metabolism linked to genetic polymorphisms. Because of their various properties, some ß-blockers are indicated for cardiovascular conditions such as angina, rate control of atrial fibrillation, chronic heart failure, and after myocardial infarction, and other indications such as migraine and essential tremor. There have been more than 17 large trials influencing the recommendations on the use of these agents in the treatment of hypertension. The results of these trials initially led to the widespread recommendation for the use of ß-blockers in the management of hypertension. However, the recent multiple meta-analyses using these trials have raised a controversy on their place in that treatment. The Canadian Hypertension Education Program recommendations have included ß-blockers as a first-line treatment option for patients younger than 60 years of age based on the evidence from these large trials, and this has been supported by 2 of the meta-analyses. This article reviews these studies to help clinicians better understand the role of ß-blockers in managing hypertension.
PubMed ID
24750978 View in PubMed
Less detail

Calcium-channel blockers do not alter the clinical efficacy of clopidogrel after myocardial infarction: a nationwide cohort study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature137753
Source
J Am Coll Cardiol. 2011 Jan 25;57(4):409-17
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jan-25-2011
Author
Jonas B Olesen
Gunnar H Gislason
Mette G Charlot
Emil L Fosbøl
Charlotte Andersson
Peter Weeke
Ole Ahlehoff
Christian Selmer
Christian Torp-Pedersen
Peter R Hansen
Author Affiliation
Department of Cardiology, Copenhagen University Hospital Gentofte, Hellerup, Denmark. jo@heart.dk
Source
J Am Coll Cardiol. 2011 Jan 25;57(4):409-17
Date
Jan-25-2011
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aged
Calcium Channel Blockers - adverse effects - therapeutic use
Cause of Death
Cohort Studies
Confidence Intervals
Denmark
Dose-Response Relationship, Drug
Drug Administration Schedule
Drug Interactions
Drug Therapy, Combination
Female
Follow-Up Studies
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Multivariate Analysis
Myocardial Infarction - diagnosis - drug therapy - mortality
Proportional Hazards Models
Registries
Retrospective Studies
Survival Analysis
Ticlopidine - adverse effects - analogs & derivatives - therapeutic use
Time Factors
Treatment Outcome
Abstract
The purpose of this study was to determine the risk of adverse cardiovascular events associated with concomitant use of clopidogrel and calcium-channel blockers (CCBs) in patients with myocardial infarction (MI).
CCBs inhibit a variety of cytochrome P-450 enzymes, some of which contribute to clopidogrel metabolic activation. This interaction may diminish the efficacy of clopidogrel.
All patients surviving 30 days after a first-time MI in the period 2000 to 2006 in Denmark were identified by individual-level linkage of nationwide administrative registers. The cohort was divided into patients treated with and without clopidogrel and followed for 1 year after discharge. The risk of a composite of cardiovascular death, MI, or stroke and the risk of the individual components of the composite end point and all-cause death associated with CCBs were analyzed with multivariable Cox proportional hazard models and in univariate propensity score-matched models.
A total of 56,800 patients were included, of whom 24,923 were treated with clopidogrel and 13,380 with CCBs. In the Cox analyses, the risk of the composite end point associated with CCBs was increased in both patients treated and not treated with clopidogrel, with a hazard ratio of 1.15 (95% confidence interval [CI]: 1.07 to 1.24) and 1.05 (95% CI: 1.01 to 1.11), respectively. The increased risk was independent of clopidogrel use; the hazard rate ratio was 1.08 (95% CI: 0.99 to 1.18). Analyses of all additional adverse end points and propensity score-matched models provided similar results.
The clinical efficacy of clopidogrel in patients with a recent MI is not modified by concomitant CCB treatment. This potential drug interaction is unlikely to have clinical significance.
PubMed ID
21251580 View in PubMed
Less detail

Cardiovascular drugs and the risk of death in acute myocardial infarction in northern Sweden MONICA patients.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature53848
Source
Int J Circumpolar Health. 2001 Aug;60(3):366-74
Publication Type
Article
Date
Aug-2001
Author
T. Messner
F. Huhtasaari
Author Affiliation
Department of Internal Medicine, Kiruna District Hospital, Kiruna, Sweden. torbjorn.messner@kiruna.se
Source
Int J Circumpolar Health. 2001 Aug;60(3):366-74
Date
Aug-2001
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Age Distribution
Aged
Analysis of Variance
Cardiovascular Agents - therapeutic use
Cause of Death
Cohort Studies
Comparative Study
Confidence Intervals
Female
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Myocardial Infarction - diagnosis - drug therapy - mortality
Probability
Registries
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Risk assessment
Sex Distribution
Survival Rate
Sweden - epidemiology
Time Factors
Abstract
PURPOSE: To quantify the impact of cardiovascular drugs used before the acute myocardial infarction (AMI) and given during the acute phase on reduction in the risk of death during the first 28 days after an AMI. METHODS: The Northern Sweden MONICA database on incident AMI was analysed with regard to drug use before and during the acute phase of the myocardial infarction and the risk of death within the first 28 days. All patients admitted to a hospital in this area with a suspected diagnosis of AMI were included in this database. RESULTS: No drugs used before and up to the acute myocardial infarction provided protection against death in the AMI in this analysis. Among drugs given during the acute phase, antiplatelet drugs and betablocking drugs reduced the risk of death in the AMI and to a lesser degree, anticoagulants and nitrates provided protection. CONCLUSIONS: The administration of antiplatelet drugs and betablockers in the acute phase of an AMI substantially reduces the risk of death during the first 28 days after an AMI for the individual.
PubMed ID
11590876 View in PubMed
Less detail

68 records – page 1 of 7.