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173 records – page 1 of 18.

A 10-year prospective study of tobacco smoking and periodontal health.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature67464
Source
J Periodontol. 2000 Aug;71(8):1338-47
Publication Type
Article
Date
Aug-2000
Author
J. Bergström
S. Eliasson
J. Dock
Author Affiliation
Department of Periodontology, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden.
Source
J Periodontol. 2000 Aug;71(8):1338-47
Date
Aug-2000
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Age Factors
Aged
Alveolar Bone Loss - epidemiology
Analysis of Variance
Cohort Studies
Comparative Study
Dental Plaque Index
Female
Follow-Up Studies
Gingival Hemorrhage - epidemiology
Humans
Linear Models
Longitudinal Studies
Male
Middle Aged
Music
Observer Variation
Oral Hygiene
Periodontal Diseases - epidemiology
Periodontal Pocket - epidemiology
Population Surveillance
Prospective Studies
Regression Analysis
Smoking - epidemiology
Smoking Cessation - statistics & numerical data
Sweden - epidemiology
Abstract
BACKGROUND: To date only a few studies have evaluated the long-term influence of smoking and smoking cessation on periodontal health. The present study, therefore, was undertaken with the aim to prospectively investigate the influence of smoking exposure over time on the periodontal health condition in a targeted population before and after a follow-up interval of 10 years. METHODS: The primary study base consisted of a population of occupational musicians that was investigated the first time in 1982 and scheduled for reinvestigation in 1992 and 2002. The 1992 investigation included 101 individuals from the baseline study constituting a prospective cohort including 16 smokers, who had continued to smoke throughout the entire length of the 10-year period; 28 former smokers who had ceased smoking an average of approximately 9 years before the commencement of the baseline study; 40 non-smokers, who denied ever having smoked tobacco; and 17 individuals whose smoking pattern changed or for whom incomplete data were available. The clinical and radiographic variables used for the assessment of the periodontal health condition of the individual were frequency of periodontally diseased sites (probing depth > or =4 mm), gingival bleeding (%), and periodontal bone height (%). The oral hygiene standard was evaluated by means of a standard plaque index. RESULTS: The changes over the 10 years with respect to frequency of diseased sites indicated an increased frequency in continuous smokers versus decreased frequencies in former smokers and non-smokers. Controlling for age and frequency of diseased sites at baseline, the 10-year change was significantly associated with smoking (P
PubMed ID
10972650 View in PubMed
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Affected in the nightclub. A case study of regular clubbers' conflictual practices in nightclubs.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature113967
Source
Int J Drug Policy. 2013 May;24(3):196-202
Publication Type
Article
Date
May-2013
Author
Jakob Demant
Author Affiliation
Aarhus University, Centre for Alcohol and Drug Research, Denmark. jd@crf.au.dk
Source
Int J Drug Policy. 2013 May;24(3):196-202
Date
May-2013
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Alcohol drinking - epidemiology
Conflict (Psychology)
Denmark
Female
Humans
Male
Music
Philosophy
Psychological Theory
Restaurants
Street Drugs
Substance-Related Disorders - epidemiology
Young Adult
Abstract
The nightclub as a space is presented as a free and hedonistic place for pleasure. This space is also part of a wider socio-spatial-economic framework in which various forms of regulation apply to clubbers and the cultivation of affects. This paper researches marginal and contested forms of experiences within a club as a way of understanding the complexities of pleasure. The study does so by addressing experiences through the concept of affects, which is situated within a framework of a non-representational theory of space. Anxiety, pride, anger, shame and embarrassment are embodied simultaneously with the affects of love, joy, sympathy and so on. Alcohol, illicit drugs, bouncers, music and other human or non-human actants are part of the place. It is within this heterogeneous assemblage that affects become embodied. The data consists of 273 cases from a large Copenhagen nightclub where guests have complained about being rejected or being given quarantine. The paper suggests that if the space of the club is approached as being more than a mono-affectual space of either risk or pleasure, then it would be possible to reduce conflicts and produce more inclusive spaces.
Notes
Comment In: Int J Drug Policy. 2013 May;24(3):167-7223352332
PubMed ID
23664721 View in PubMed
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Alexander Nikolaevich Scriabin (1872-1915): Enlightenment or illness?

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature282191
Source
J Med Biogr. 2016 Aug;24(3):331-8
Publication Type
Article
Date
Aug-2016
Author
Eliezer Witztum
Vladimir Lerner
Source
J Med Biogr. 2016 Aug;24(3):331-8
Date
Aug-2016
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Affective Disorders, Psychotic - history
Famous Persons
History, 19th Century
History, 20th Century
Music - history
Perceptual Disorders - history
Russia
Abstract
The similarity between psychotic symptoms and aspects of mystical experiences is well known. It has long been recognized that there are similarities between mystical and spiritual and psychotic experiences. The content of an experience alone usually does not determine whether an individual is psychotic. The Russian composer Scriabin (1872-1915) was among the most famous artists of his time. Scriabin infused his music with mysticism, evolving a modernistic idiom through which he created a musical counterpart to the Symbolist literature of that period. In this paper, we discuss the question that arises from perusing Scriabin's life is whether the composer was a mystic genius or whether he suffered from affective psychopathology with psychotic features.
PubMed ID
24906401 View in PubMed
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[An open dialogue about Roskilde Festival 2000].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature193135
Source
Ugeskr Laeger. 2001 Sep 10;163(37):5045-6
Publication Type
Article
Date
Sep-10-2001
Author
A B Horn
Source
Ugeskr Laeger. 2001 Sep 10;163(37):5045-6
Date
Sep-10-2001
Language
Danish
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Accidents
Crowding
Denmark
Disaster planning
Disasters
Holidays
Humans
Music
Physician's Role
Notes
Comment On: Ugeskr Laeger. 2001 Aug 6;163(32):421511510244
PubMed ID
11573386 View in PubMed
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[Are physicians more interested in music than other professional groups?]

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature73253
Source
Tidsskr Nor Laegeforen. 1993 Dec 10;113(30):3737-42
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-10-1993
Author
O G Aasland
S A Kallevik
Source
Tidsskr Nor Laegeforen. 1993 Dec 10;113(30):3737-42
Date
Dec-10-1993
Language
Norwegian
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Aged
Comparative Study
English Abstract
Female
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Music - psychology
Norway
Physicians - psychology
Questionnaires
Abstract
1,031 Norwegian physicians were questioned about their attendance at various musical events, and whether they played an instrument or were active in an orchestra or a choir. 36% of the physicians had been to the opera or the ballet during the last year, and 64% to at least one classical concert. 39% had been to a pop, rock or jazz concert. For the first two categories the figures are higher than in a group of Norwegian university graduates. 55% of the physicians can play an instrument, and 18% do so actively. These figures are also higher than in the university graduate group. Participation in an orchestra or choir is highest among general practitioners and public health physicians.
PubMed ID
8278962 View in PubMed
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Assessment of hearing and hearing disorders in rock/jazz musicians.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature184094
Source
Int J Audiol. 2003 Jul;42(5):279-88
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jul-2003
Author
Kim Kähärit
Gunilla Zachau
Mats Eklöf
Leif Sandsjö
Claes Möller
Author Affiliation
National Institute for Working Life/West, Department of Audiology, Göteborg University, Göteborg, Sweden. kim.kahari@arbetslivsinstitutet.se
Source
Int J Audiol. 2003 Jul;42(5):279-88
Date
Jul-2003
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Acoustic Stimulation
Audiometry, Pure-Tone
Female
Hearing - physiology
Hearing Disorders - diagnosis - epidemiology - physiopathology
Hearing Loss - diagnosis - physiopathology
Humans
Hyperacusis - diagnosis - physiopathology
Male
Music
Perceptual Distortion - physiology
Questionnaires
Sweden
Time Factors
Tinnitus - diagnosis - physiopathology
Abstract
The aim of this study was to assess hearing and hearing disorders among rock/jazz musicians. One hundred and thirty-nine (43 women and 96 men) musicians participated. The results are based on pure-tone audiometry and questionnaire responses. According to our definition of hearing loss, tinnitus, hyperacusis, distortion and/or diplacusis as hearing disorders, we found disorders in 74%, of the rock/jazz musicians studied. Hearing loss, tinnitus and hyperacusis were most common, and the latter two were found significantly more frequently than in different reference populations. The women showed bilateral, significantly better hearing thresholds at 3-6 kHz than the men. Hyperacusis, and the combination of both hyperacusis and tinnitus, were found to be significantly more frequent among women than among men. Hearing loss and tinnitus were significantly more common among men than among women. It is important to evaluate all kinds of hearing problems (other than hearing loss) in musicians, since they represent an occupational group especially dependent on optimal, functional hearing. On the basis of our results, we suggest that hearing problems such as tinnitus, hyperacusis, distortion and/or diplacusis should, in addition to hearing loss, be defined as hearing disorders.
PubMed ID
12916701 View in PubMed
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Assessment of vocal capacity of Finnish university students.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature157135
Source
Folia Phoniatr Logop. 2008;60(4):199-209
Publication Type
Article
Date
2008
Author
Timo Leino
Anne-Maria Laukkanen
Irma Ilomäki
Elinita Mäki
Author Affiliation
Department of Speech Communication and Voice Research, University of Tampere, Tampere, Finland.
Source
Folia Phoniatr Logop. 2008;60(4):199-209
Date
2008
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Female
Finland
Humans
Male
Music
Phonation - physiology
Pulmonary Ventilation
Reading
Vital Capacity
Voice Disorders - physiopathology
Voice Quality
Abstract
This article summarizes the results for a total of 189 female and 63 male university students (mean age 23 and 26 years, respectively) from the following vocal capacity tests: measurement of (1) vital capacity, (2) average airflow in phonation (on [o:]), (3) maximum duration of sustained blowing, (4) maximum phonation time (on [o:, z:]), (5) maximum duration of [s:], (6) the ratio of the duration of [s:] to [z:] (s/z ratio), (7) phonation quotient (the ratio between vital capacity and maximum phonation time), (8) the lowest possible tone, (9) mean fundamental frequency (F0) in normal and loud text reading and in shouting, (10) difference between the lowest tone and mean F0 in text reading and in shouting, (11) F0 range in text reading, (12) equivalent sound level of normal and loud reading and of shouting in maximum loudness, (13) phonetogram (voice range profile) and (14) long-term average spectrum of text reading. Voice quality is also evaluated perceptually, and additionally, data on subjects' self-reported vocal fatigue symptoms in general or after a vocally loading task were collected. The value of these measurements from the point of view of assessment of vocal capacity will be discussed.
PubMed ID
18487880 View in PubMed
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Association Between Unstable Work and Occupational Wellbeing Among Artists in Finland: Results of a Psychosocial Survey.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature275901
Source
Med Probl Perform Art. 2016 Jun;31(2):104-9
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-2016
Author
Katinka Tuisku
Pia Houni
Johanna Seppänen
Marianna Virtanen
Source
Med Probl Perform Art. 2016 Jun;31(2):104-9
Date
Jun-2016
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Burnout, Professional - psychology
Employment - psychology
Female
Finland
Health status
Humans
Job Satisfaction
Male
Middle Aged
Music - psychology
Socioeconomic Factors
Work Schedule Tolerance - psychology
Workload - psychology
Young Adult
Abstract
Although artistic work is in transition, the occupational wellbeing of artists has been less studied than wellbeing among other workers. This study aimed to explore the relationship between work characteristics and occupational (psychosocial) wellbeing of artists.
A national questionnaire was sent to all artists (theatre artists, writers, and visual artists) reached by four major labor unions in Finland. Type of employment (permanent full-time work vs other), working field (own field of art vs other), regularity of working hours (regular vs irregular), and control of workload were assessed. The wellbeing outcomes were work engagement, recovery from work, and experience of stress and low mood.
Full-time permanent employment, regular working hours, and working in one's own field of art were positively associated with work engagement. Furthermore, regular working hours were positively associated with recovery and negatively associated with subjective report of low mood. Ability to control workload was positively associated with recovery and negatively associated with stress and low mood. Higher age was associated with lower stress and better recovery.
Artists with regular working hours, secure employment, ability to control workload, working in one's own field of art, and higher age reported better wellbeing in this study. The late stages of career appear to guarantee more stability and wellbeing than the more insecure beginning of a career.
PubMed ID
27281381 View in PubMed
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The association of noise sensitivity with music listening, training, and aptitude.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature267732
Source
Noise Health. 2015 Sep-Oct;17(78):350-7
Publication Type
Article
Author
Marina Kliuchko
Marja Heinonen-Guzejev
Lucia Monacis
Benjamin P Gold
Kauko V Heikkilä
Vittoria Spinosa
Mari Tervaniemi
Elvira Brattico
Source
Noise Health. 2015 Sep-Oct;17(78):350-7
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Acoustic Stimulation - methods
Adult
Aptitude - physiology
Auditory Threshold
Evoked Potentials, Auditory
Female
Finland
Humans
Italy
Loudness Perception
Male
Middle Aged
Music
Noise
Perceptual Masking
Reaction Time
Sound
Teaching
Time
Abstract
After intensive, long-term musical training, the auditory system of a musician is specifically tuned to perceive musical sounds. We wished to find out whether a musician's auditory system also develops increased sensitivity to any sound of everyday life, experiencing them as noise. For this purpose, an online survey, including questionnaires on noise sensitivity, musical background, and listening tests for assessing musical aptitude, was administered to 197 participants in Finland and Italy. Subjective noise sensitivity (assessed with the Weinstein's Noise Sensitivity Scale) was analyzed for associations with musicianship, musical aptitude, weekly time spent listening to music, and the importance of music in each person's life (or music importance). Subjects were divided into three groups according to their musical expertise: Nonmusicians (N = 103), amateur musicians (N = 44), and professional musicians (N = 50). The results showed that noise sensitivity did not depend on musical expertise or performance on musicality tests or the amount of active (attentive) listening to music. In contrast, it was associated with daily passive listening to music, so that individuals with higher noise sensitivity spent less time in passive (background) listening to music than those with lower sensitivity to noise. Furthermore, noise-sensitive respondents rated music as less important in their life than did individuals with lower sensitivity to noise. The results demonstrate that the special sensitivity of the auditory system derived from musical training does not lead to increased irritability from unwanted sounds. However, the disposition to tolerate contingent musical backgrounds in everyday life depends on the individual's noise sensitivity.
PubMed ID
26356378 View in PubMed
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Association of the arginine vasopressin receptor 1A (AVPR1A) haplotypes with listening to music.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature137173
Source
J Hum Genet. 2011 Apr;56(4):324-9
Publication Type
Article
Date
Apr-2011
Author
Liisa Ukkola-Vuoti
Jaana Oikkonen
Päivi Onkamo
Kai Karma
Pirre Raijas
Irma Järvelä
Author Affiliation
Department of Medical Genetics, Haartman Institute, University of Helsinki, Helsinki, Finland.
Source
J Hum Genet. 2011 Apr;56(4):324-9
Date
Apr-2011
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Aptitude - physiology
Attention
Child
Female
Finland
Genotype
Haplotypes - genetics
Humans
Internet
Male
Microsatellite Repeats - genetics
Middle Aged
Music
Pedigree
Questionnaires
Receptors, Vasopressin - genetics
Serotonin Plasma Membrane Transport Proteins - genetics
Social Behavior
Abstract
Music is listened in all cultures. We hypothesize that willingness to produce and perceive sound and music is social communication that needs musical aptitude. Here, listening to music was surveyed using a web-based questionnaire and musical aptitude using the auditory structuring ability test (Karma Music test) and Carl Seashores tests for pitch and for time. Three highly polymorphic microsatellite markers (RS3, RS1 and AVR) of the arginine vasopressin receptor 1A (AVPR1A) gene, previously associated with social communication and attachment, were genotyped and analyzed in 31 Finnish families (n=437 members) using family-based association analysis. A positive association between the AVPR1A haplotype (RS1 and AVR) and active current listening to music (permuted P=0.0019) was observed. Other AVPR1A haplotype (RS3 and AVR) showed association with lifelong active listening to music (permuted P=0.0022). In addition to AVPR1A, two polymorphisms (5-HTTLPR and variable number of tandem repeat) of human serotonin transporter gene (SLC6A4), a candidate gene for many neuropsychiatric disorders and previously associated with emotional processing, were analyzed. No association between listening to music and the polymorphisms of SLC6A4 were detected. The results suggest that willingness to listen to music is related to neurobiological pathways affecting social affiliation and communication.
PubMed ID
21307861 View in PubMed
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173 records – page 1 of 18.