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30 records – page 1 of 3.

[City Public Health Museum on Nurses].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature237108
Source
Med Sestra. 1986 May;45(5):48-9
Publication Type
Article
Date
May-1986
Author
I V Kuznetsov
V V Toropygina
Source
Med Sestra. 1986 May;45(5):48-9
Date
May-1986
Language
Russian
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Humans
Museums
Nursing
Public Health
Russia
PubMed ID
2943967 View in PubMed
Less detail

Alaskan Heteroptera (Hemiptera): new records, associated data, and deletions.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature273953
Source
Zootaxa. 2014;3852(3):373-81
Publication Type
Article
Date
2014
Author
G G E Scudder
D S Sikes
Source
Zootaxa. 2014;3852(3):373-81
Date
2014
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Alaska
Animals
Female
Heteroptera - classification
Male
Museums
Abstract
Twenty-seven species of Heteroptera are recorded new to Alaska. Specimen data for ten additional species reported from Alaska without previously published data are also provided. Additionally, four species previously reported from the state are removed from the Alaska list of Heteroptera. 
PubMed ID
25284405 View in PubMed
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Breaking Conventions: How the Smithsonian's Arctic Studies Center Makes a Difference in the Community

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature257249
Source
First Alaskans. 2013 Feb/Mar; (): 56-60.
Publication Type
Article
Date
2013
  1 website  

Engaging Our Youth: Smithsonian Pilots New Program at Inuit Studies Conference

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature257248
Source
First Alaskans. 2013 Feb/Mar; (): 72-73.
Publication Type
Article
Date
2013
  1 website  

[Ellen's work-station is exhibits in the museum. Interview by Christina Mörk.]

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature65096
Source
Vardfacket. 1991 Feb 7;15(3):64-7
Publication Type
Article
Date
Feb-7-1991
Author
E. Lilja
Source
Vardfacket. 1991 Feb 7;15(3):64-7
Date
Feb-7-1991
Language
Swedish
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Female
History of Nursing
History, 20th Century
Humans
Museums
Pregnancy
Sweden
PubMed ID
2053416 View in PubMed
Less detail

Giving Outside the Box: Traditions of Giving and Living the Good Life

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature257250
Source
First Alaskans. Dec 2012/Jan 2013; (): 36-39.
Publication Type
Article
Date
2012
  1 website  
Author
Leslie Hsu Oh
Source
First Alaskans. Dec 2012/Jan 2013; (): 36-39.
Date
2012
Language
English
Geographic Location
U.S.
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Arctic
Alaska
Anchorage
Museum
Artifacts
History
Elders
Giving
Service
Gratitude
Children
Teaching
Online Resources
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The cancer journey: bridging art therapy and museum education.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature191035
Source
Can Oncol Nurs J. 2000;10(4):140-2, 143-6
Publication Type
Article
Date
2000
Author
K. Deane
M. Carman
M. Fitch
Author Affiliation
McMichael Canadian Art Collection in Kleinburg, Ontario.
Source
Can Oncol Nurs J. 2000;10(4):140-2, 143-6
Date
2000
Language
English
French
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adaptation, Psychological
Art Therapy
Humans
Interinstitutional Relations
Museums
Neoplasms - psychology - therapy
Ontario
Abstract
This paper describes the application of art therapy in assisting cancer patients to visually express their cancer experience on several levels--physically, psychosocially, and spiritually. The art therapy/museum education program was developed in 1996 at the McMichael Canadian Art Collection in partnership with Toronto-Sunnybrook Regional Cancer Centre-Bayview Support Network. To date, the program has run for three rounds with 16 sessions in each round. The facilitator for all three rounds was a trained art therapist. The program provided an unique opportunity for an arts institution to serve the community at large by offering an artistic outlet in a peaceful, rural setting in contrast to a sterile hospital environment. The specific goals of the program and the general therapeutic benefits of art therapy are described. In addition, the effectiveness of an existential/phenomenological approach in not only serving the cancer population, but also bridging the two diverse disciplines--art therapy and museum education--is explored. It is suggested that an existential therapeutic approach promotes the confrontation and acceptance of death that is necessary in order to lead a more meaningful life. Moreover, a phenomenological approach promotes the act of "seeing" as an essential ingredient in gaining objectivity and bringing unconscious thoughts into consciousness. The importance of social and emotional support in the way of art therapy in addition to medical care is emphasized. Through art therapy, cancer patients are encouraged to discover ways to face pain and misfortune and be creative in their "art of living."
PubMed ID
11894320 View in PubMed
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[The museum of hygiene and its role in the cultural life of Russian society].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature131528
Source
Probl Sotsialnoi Gig Zdravookhranenniiai Istor Med. 2011 May-Jun;(3):57-60
Publication Type
Article
Source
Probl Sotsialnoi Gig Zdravookhranenniiai Istor Med. 2011 May-Jun;(3):57-60
Language
Russian
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
History, 19th Century
History, 20th Century
Humans
Hygiene - history
Museums - history
Preventive Medicine - history
Russia
Abstract
The considerable historical material was used to consider the issues of origin and development of museums of history in Russia. As an example the museum of hygiene of municipal medical prevention center of St. Petersburg was taken. The article proves the nowadays significance of such public institution as museum of hygiene. The role of prominent hygienists in the development of museum business in Russia is emphasized. For the first time the museum of hygiene is presented as one of institutions of preventive medicine of Russia.
PubMed ID
21899041 View in PubMed
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The history of botany in Moscow and Russia in the 18th and early 19th centuries in the context of the Linnaean Collection at Moscow University (MW).

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature57217
Source
Huntia. 2002;11(2):129-91
Publication Type
Article
Date
2002
Author
Dmitry D Sokoloff
Sergey A Balandin
Ivan A Gubanov
Charles E Jarvis
Sergey R Majorov
Sergey S Simonov
Author Affiliation
Higher Plants Department, Biological Faculty, Moscow State University, Russia. sokoloff@dds.srcc.msu.su
Source
Huntia. 2002;11(2):129-91
Date
2002
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Botany - history
History, 18th Century
History, 19th Century
Medicine, Herbal
Museums - history
Russia
Universities - history
Abstract
The Herbarium of Moscow State University, Russia, possesses a relatively small (63 specimens), but historically interesting, collection of herbarium specimens linked with Carl Linnaeus (1707-1778). Some of these originally formed part of Linnaeus' own herbarium while others, although never his property, were nevertheless studied by him and may be original material for the typification of his plant names. This paper discusses the broad historical background to the gathering of these specimens, their study by Linnaeus and their subsequent fate. Specimens linked with Linnaeus have been encountered in each of the four largest historical collections of the Herbarium of Moscow State University, i. e., in the herbaria of J. F. Ehrhart, G. F. Hoffmann, C. B. von Trinius and C. L. Goldbach. Ehrhart's General Herbarium contains 31 sheets, which were more or less certainly collected or studied by Linnaeus. Ehrhart, a pupil of Linnaeus, received some specimens directly from the latter, while others came to him from Linnaeus filius, A. Dahl, and P. J. Bergius. Ehrhart's collections were purchased by G. F. Hoffmann, later, the first head of the Department of Botany at Moscow University, who took them to Russia. Hoffmann's General Herbarium contains three specimens that may be connected with Linnaeus. They were received from C. P. Thunberg, J. A. Murray, and an unknown person, respectively. At least five specimens from Trinius' collection, although certainly never seen by Linnaeus, are probable duplicates of material that was studied by him. Some of them are almost certainly iso-lectotypes of Linnaean names. Finally, 24 specimens linked with Linnaeus were found in Goldbach's herbarium. The majority of them were collected in the Lower Volga Region by J. Lerche and during the Second Kamchatka Expedition (Great Northern Expedition) by J. G. Gmelin and G. W. Steller.
PubMed ID
12382654 View in PubMed
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[Organization of the Museum of History of Occupational Medicine and Occupational Diseases in the USSR].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature238278
Source
Gig Tr Prof Zabol. 1985 Oct;(10):37-9
Publication Type
Article
Date
Oct-1985

30 records – page 1 of 3.