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44 records – page 1 of 5.

A 10-year follow-up study of tick-borne encephalitis in the Stockholm area and a review of the literature: need for a vaccination strategy.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature35021
Source
Scand J Infect Dis. 1996;28(3):217-24
Publication Type
Article
Date
1996
Author
M. Haglund
M. Forsgren
G. Lindh
L. Lindquist
Author Affiliation
Department of Infectious Diseases, Stockholm Country Council, Huddinge Hospital, Sweden.
Source
Scand J Infect Dis. 1996;28(3):217-24
Date
1996
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Age Factors
Aged
Child
Encephalitis, Tick-Borne - complications - epidemiology - immunology
Female
Follow-Up Studies
Headache - complications
Humans
Male
Mental Disorders - complications
Middle Aged
Musculoskeletal Equilibrium
Prevalence
Questionnaires
Sensation Disorders - complications
Seroepidemiologic Studies
Sweden - epidemiology
Vaccination
Abstract
143 people treated for tick-borne encephalitis (TBE) were included in a retrospective follow-up study. Sequelae and epidemiological characteristics in 114 individuals were analysed. The case fatality rate and the prevalence of residual paresis were low, 1.4 and 2.7%, respectively. However, 40 (35.7%) individuals were found to have a postencephalitic syndrome after a median follow-up time of 47 months, and a majority (77.5%) of these were classified as moderate to severe. Various mental disorders, balance and co-ordination disorders and headache were the most frequently reported symptoms. Increasing age was correlated to a longer duration of hospital stay, longer convalescence and increased risk of permanent sequelae. Results from a neuropsychiatric questionnaire showed marked differences between the subjects with sequelae compared to controls. 57% had noticed a tick bite before admission, and 48% were aware of at least one person in their environment who previously had contracted TBE. 79% were permanent residents or visited endemic areas often and regularly. In conclusion, we have found that TBE in the Stockholm area has a low case fatality rate, but gives rise to a considerable number of different neurological and mental sequelae, which justifies vaccination of a defined risk population in endemic areas.
PubMed ID
8863349 View in PubMed
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Analysis of sway in Parkinson's disease using a new inclinometry-based method.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature50748
Source
Mov Disord. 2002 Jul;17(4):663-9
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jul-2002
Author
Maria K Viitasalo
Ville Kampman
Kyösti A Sotaniemi
Seppo Leppävuori
Vilho V Myllylä
Juha T Korpelainen
Author Affiliation
Department of Neurology, University of Oulu, Oulu, Finland.
Source
Mov Disord. 2002 Jul;17(4):663-9
Date
Jul-2002
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Equipment Design
Female
Humans
Kinesthesis - physiology
Male
Microcomputers
Middle Aged
Musculoskeletal Equilibrium - physiology
Neurologic Examination - instrumentation
Orientation - physiology
Parkinson Disease - diagnosis - physiopathology
Posture - physiology
Reference Values
Signal Processing, Computer-Assisted - instrumentation
Abstract
In order to analyze balance control, we developed a new inclinometry-based method to provide direct information about body sway in the side-to-side and forward-backward directions. We tested the clinical utility of this method for analyzing balance in Parkinson's disease (PD), and studied the clinical correlates of the balance measures in PD. Postural sway was measured during quiet stance with eyes open and eyes closed in 28 PD patients and in 32 age- and sex-matched control subjects. Postural sway was modeled using side-to-side and forward-backward directional sway movements, sway velocity, and sway area. The amount of postural sway in the PD patients was greater than in the control subjects, the higher level being most marked in patients with severe or long-duration PD. All the side-to-side directional sway parameters were abnormal in the PD patients compared with the control subjects (P
PubMed ID
12210854 View in PubMed
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Assessments of interrater reliability and internal consistency of the Norwegian version of the Berg Balance Scale.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature79222
Source
Arch Phys Med Rehabil. 2007 Jan;88(1):94-8
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jan-2007
Author
Halsaa Karin E
Brovold Therese
Graver Vibeke
Sandvik Leiv
Bergland Astrid
Author Affiliation
Department of Geriatric Medicine, Ullevaal University Hospital, Oslo, Norway. karin.halsaa@ulleval.no
Source
Arch Phys Med Rehabil. 2007 Jan;88(1):94-8
Date
Jan-2007
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Activities of Daily Living
Age Factors
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Day Care
Factor Analysis, Statistical
Female
Geriatric Assessment - methods
Geriatrics
Hospitals, Special
Humans
Male
Mass Screening - methods - standards
Musculoskeletal Equilibrium
Norway
Observer Variation
Physical Examination - methods - standards
Sensation Disorders - classification - diagnosis - physiopathology - rehabilitation
Severity of Illness Index
Statistics, nonparametric
Translating
Abstract
OBJECTIVE: To investigate the interrater reliability and the internal consistency of the Norwegian version of the Berg Balance Scale (BBS) when applied to patients in a geriatric department. DESIGN: Interrater reliability was measured using the kappa statistics and intraclass correlation coefficients (ICCs). SETTING: Geriatric rehabilitation unit and geriatric day hospital in Norway. PARTICIPANTS: Eighty-three patients were included; 25 were inpatients in a geriatric rehabilitation unit, whereas 58 were admitted to a geriatric day hospital. INTERVENTIONS: Not applicable. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURE: The BBS. RESULTS: The kappa values for the different BBS items varied from 0.83 to 1.00, and the ICC for the sum score of the BBS was .998 (95% confidence interval, .996-.999). The mean value of the BBS was 44.4. There was a negative significant relation between age and the sum score (r=-.36). The sum scores of BBS ranged from 12 to 56. The patients were able to perform the BBS without ceiling effect. The score values 3 and 4 were more frequently used than the score values 0, 1, and 2. CONCLUSIONS: The Norwegian version of the BBS seems to have an excellent interrater reliability and high internal consistency when applied to patients in geriatric rehabilitation.
Notes
Erratum In: Arch Phys Med Rehabil. 2007 Apr;88(4):544
PubMed ID
17207682 View in PubMed
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Balance and gait performance in an urban and a rural population.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature72646
Source
J Am Geriatr Soc. 1998 Jan;46(1):65-70
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jan-1998
Author
K A Ringsberg
P. Gärdsell
O. Johnell
B. Jónsson
K J Obrant
I. Sernbo
Author Affiliation
Department of Orthopaedics, Malmö University Hospital, Lund University, Sweden.
Source
J Am Geriatr Soc. 1998 Jan;46(1):65-70
Date
Jan-1998
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Analysis of Variance
Comparative Study
Cross-Sectional Studies
Female
Gait
Health status
Humans
Leisure Activities
Male
Middle Aged
Musculoskeletal Equilibrium
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Rural Population
Sweden
Urban Population
Work
Abstract
OBJECTIVE: To compare the differences in standing balance and gait performance between two populations, correlated with age and physical activities of daily living. DESIGN: A cross-sectional study. SETTINGS: Malmö, the third largest city in Sweden, and Sjöbo, a typical agricultural community 60 km east of Malmö. PARTICIPANTS: Participants were 570 men and women from the urban community (urban) and 391 from the rural community (rural), born in 1938, 1928, 1918, and 1908, and women born in 1948. The two cohorts were subdivided into true urbans, who had lived only in the city (n = 269), and true rurals, who had never lived in a city (n = 354). MEASUREMENTS: Information about workload, housing, spare time activities, medication, and illness during different decades of life was gathered using two questionnaires. The first questionnaire was sent to the home after agreement to participate, and the second was presented at the test session. The clinical measurements were standing balance, gait speed, and step length. RESULTS: The urban subjects had significantly (P
PubMed ID
9434667 View in PubMed
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Balance performance and self-perceived handicap among dizzy patients in primary health care.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature70507
Source
Scand J Prim Health Care. 2005 Dec;23(4):215-20
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-2005
Author
Eva Ekvall Hansson
Nils-Ove Månsson
Anders Håkansson
Author Affiliation
Department of Clinical Sciences, Family Medicine, Lund University, SE-205 02 Malmö, Sweden. eva.ekvall-hansson@med.lu.se
Source
Scand J Prim Health Care. 2005 Dec;23(4):215-20
Date
Dec-2005
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Age Factors
Aged
Dizziness - diagnosis - physiopathology - psychology
Female
Humans
Male
Medical Records Systems, Computerized
Middle Aged
Musculoskeletal Equilibrium
Posture
Retrospective Studies
Self Concept
Sickness Impact Profile
Vertigo - diagnosis - physiopathology - psychology
Abstract
OBJECTIVE: To study the diagnostic panorama at a primary health care centre where the physiotherapist is specialized in dizziness. To study balance measures of dizzy patients as well as measures of self-perceived handicap and to analyse whether these measures correlate. DESIGN: Retrospective study of computerized medical records. SETTING: A primary health care centre in Malmö, Sweden. SUBJECTS: A total of 119 patients with dizziness, 73 women and 46 men, aged from 22 to 90 years. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES: Diagnoses according to specified criteria. Four balance measures: tandem standing, standing on one leg, walking in a figure of eight, and walking heel to toe on a line. The Dizziness Handicap Inventory (DHI). RESULTS: Six different groups of diagnoses were found: multisensory dizziness, peripheral vestibular disorder, dizziness as a symptom caused by whiplash-associated disorder, unspecific dizziness, phobic postural vertigo, and dizziness of cervical origin. The group with multisensory dizziness performed poorer on the balance measures than the other groups. The group with phobic postural vertigo had the highest total scores on DHI, while the vestibular group had the lowest total score. Subjects over 65 years old had more disturbances in balance, but a lower level of self-perceived handicap, than subjects aged 65 or younger. DHI did not correlate with any of the balance measures. CONCLUSIONS: Self-perceived handicap, measured with DHI, and disturbed balance measured with clinical methods, do not necessarily correlate. Elderly patients with dizziness seem to have more disturbances in balance than younger patients but a lower level of self-perceived handicap.
PubMed ID
16272069 View in PubMed
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Behavioral assessment of aging in male Fischer 344 and brown Norway rat strains and their F1 hybrid.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature75113
Source
Neurobiol Aging. 1994 May-Jun;15(3):319-28
Publication Type
Article
Author
E L Spangler
K S Waggie
J. Hengemihle
D. Roberts
B. Hess
D K Ingram
Author Affiliation
Molecular Physiology and Genetics Section, Nathan W. Shock Laboratories, National Institutes on Aging, National Institutes of Health, Baltimore, MD 21224.
Source
Neurobiol Aging. 1994 May-Jun;15(3):319-28
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aging - psychology
Animals
Avoidance Learning - physiology
Behavior, Animal - physiology
Body Weight - physiology
Hybridization, Genetic
Male
Motor Activity - physiology
Muscles - physiology
Musculoskeletal Equilibrium - physiology
Psychomotor Performance - physiology
Rats
Rats, Inbred BN
Rats, Inbred F344
Species Specificity
Abstract
Male Fischer-344 (F344) and Brown Norway (BN) rats 7-, 13-, and 24-month-old and their F344 x BN hybrid (F1) 7-, 13-, 24- and 31-month-old were tested in a behavioral battery (15-min and 24-h locomotor activity, inclined screen, rod suspension, rotorod, shock-motivated learning in a straight runway and 14-unit T maze). Necropsy was performed 3 days later and the results rated for pathology (i.e., severity of lesions observed). Age-related performance declines were observed in all behavioral tests except 15-min locomotor activity. Strain effects were observed in 15-min (BN more active than F344 and F1) and 24-h locomotor activity test (F344 more active than BN and F1 strains); rotorod performance (F344 fell more than BN and F1); and in all measures [errors (E), runtime (RT)], shock frequency (SF), and duration (SD)] in the 14-unit T maze (F344 worse than BN, BN worse than F1). T maze performance of 31-month-old F1 rats was deficient in RT, SD, and SF but E performance was equivalent to that of 7-month-old F1 rats. In a second experiment, only 7- and 31-month-old F1 rats were tested in the 14-unit T maze and the results obtained in Experiment 1 were replicated. Gross necropsy revealed age and strain effects in the number of lesions observed and the mean ratings of pathology. The 24-month-old F344 rats exhibited the greatest number of lesions and had the highest ratings (generally observed as chronic nephrosis and enlarged spleens characteristic of mononuclear cell leukemia). BN rats exhibited a high incidence of hydronephrosis at all age levels. While experiencing less obvious pathology, F1 rats experienced a significant number of lesions in the 31-month-old group. Pathology ratings correlated with behavioral performance but only for a few tests (e.g., SD and RT in 14 unit T maze in 24-month-old F344). Thus, behavioral performance declined with age and the battery of tests differentiated between the strains tested (in general, F344 worse than BN; BN worse than F1). The correlation of pathology ratings at gross necropsy with behavior did not appear to be systematic, suggesting that morbidity was not responsible for the age-related performance declines. However, more extensive evaluation of the relationship of age-related changes in health status to behavior with larger samples of rats is suggested.
PubMed ID
7936056 View in PubMed
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[Change in eye muscle equilibrium under polar day and night conditions]

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature51459
Source
Voen Med Zh. 1980 Jun;(6):62-3
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-1980

Does glucose tolerance affect elderly persons' balance, gait or muscle strength?

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature47750
Source
Cent Eur J Public Health. 2001 Feb;9(1):22-5
Publication Type
Article
Date
Feb-2001
Author
L A Hiltunen
Author Affiliation
Department of Public Health Science and General Practice, University of Oulu, Finland. liisa.hiltunen@oulu.fi
Source
Cent Eur J Public Health. 2001 Feb;9(1):22-5
Date
Feb-2001
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Aged
Comparative Study
Diabetes Mellitus - physiopathology
Female
Finland
Gait - physiology
Glucose Intolerance - complications
Humans
Male
Muscle, Skeletal - physiopathology
Musculoskeletal Equilibrium - physiology
Reflex, Abnormal
Abstract
The aim of this study was to find out if there are associations between the deterioration of glucose tolerance and balance, gait or muscle strength among non-institutionalised northern Finnish subjects aged 70 years or over. 79% of the eligible 483 subjects participated in the study (n = 379; of whom 141 were men). 14 % (n = 19) of the men had previously diagnosed diabetes, 9% had undiagnosed diabetes, and 32% had impaired glucose tolerance (IGT). The corresponding figures for the women were 19% (n = 46), 9% (n = 21) and 35% (n = 84). The proportion of the female subjects with good balance tended to decrease along with the deterioration of the glucose tolerance status and there was a trend that disturbances in gait (walking speed, step length among the women) increased along with the deterioration of glucose tolerance. A greater proportion of the previously diagnosed diabetic subjects had decreased thenar (p = 0.09), interosseus (p = 0.00), tibialis anterior (p = 0.003), tibialis posterior (p = 0.07) and peroneus (p = 0.03) muscle strength and decreased or missing biceps (p = 0.019) and quadriceps (p = 0.010) tendon reflexes. More of the subjects with abnormal glucose tolerance had weakening of the abdominal muscles compared to the persons with normal glucose tolerance (NGT) (p = 0.001). A greater proportion of the previously diagnosed diabetic subjects had abnormal vibration sense in the sternum compared to the subjects with NGT (p = 0.028) and the tendency was similar for undiagnosed diabetes. As a majority of the abnormal findings in this study were made among the previously diagnosed diabetic patients, the long duration of hyperglycemia probably contributes to the development of these disturbances. Therefore, early detection and active treatment of hyperglycemia might prevent or at least delay the development of signs of diabetic neuropathy among elderly subjects.
PubMed ID
11243584 View in PubMed
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Effects of balance training in elderly people with nonperipheral vertigo and unsteadiness.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature49854
Source
Clin Rehabil. 2001 Oct;15(5):463-70
Publication Type
Article
Date
Oct-2001
Author
A S Kammerlind
J K Håkansson
M C Skogsberg
Author Affiliation
Department of Neuroscience and Locomotion, Linköping University, Sweden. anngu@inr.liu.se
Source
Clin Rehabil. 2001 Oct;15(5):463-70
Date
Oct-2001
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aged
Exercise Therapy
Female
Humans
Male
Musculoskeletal Equilibrium
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Sensation Disorders - diagnosis - therapy
Vertigo - diagnosis - therapy
Abstract
OBJECTIVE: To evaluate the effect of balance training in group in elderly people with nonperipheral vertigo and unsteadiness. DESIGN: Randomized controlled study. SETTING: Ear-, nose- and throat department, University Hospital, Sweden. SUBJECTS: Twenty-three elderly subjects with nonperipheral vertigo and/or unsteadiness randomized into training group and control group. INTERVENTION: The training group attended balance training in group twice a week for eight weeks. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES: Timed static balance tests, walking tests and six sensory organization tests on EquiTest dynamic posturography were performed before and after the training period. Besides, the patients estimated their vertigo and unsteadiness on a visual analogue scale (VAS) before and after the training period. RESULTS: The training group improved significantly in standing on one leg with eyes open, walking forward on a line, walking speed, in three out of six tests on dynamic posturography and estimated less vertigo and unsteadiness measured with VAS. No changes were seen in the control group. CONCLUSION: Balance training in elderly people with nonperipheral vertigo and unsteadiness seems to improve both objective and perceived balance.
PubMed ID
11594636 View in PubMed
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44 records – page 1 of 5.