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98 records – page 1 of 10.

A 10-week randomized trial comparing eccentric vs. concentric hamstring strength training in well-trained soccer players.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature49656
Source
Scand J Med Sci Sports. 2004 Oct;14(5):311-7
Publication Type
Article
Date
Oct-2004
Author
Roald Mjølsnes
Arni Arnason
Tor Østhagen
Truls Raastad
Roald Bahr
Author Affiliation
Oslo Sports Trauma Research Center, Norwegian University of Sport and Physical Education, Oslo, Norway.
Source
Scand J Med Sci Sports. 2004 Oct;14(5):311-7
Date
Oct-2004
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Comparative Study
Humans
Knee - physiology
Male
Muscles - physiology
Physical Education and Training - methods
Physical Fitness
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Soccer
Time Factors
Abstract
PURPOSE: To compare the effects of a 10-week training program with two different exercises -- traditional hamstring curl (HC) and Nordic hamstrings (NH), a partner exercise focusing the eccentric phase -- on muscle strength among male soccer players. METHODS: Subjects were 21 well-trained players who were randomized to NH training (n = 11) or HC training (n = 10). The programs were similar, with a gradual increase in the number of repetitions from two sets of six reps to three sets of eight to 12 reps over 4 weeks, and then increasing load during the final 6 weeks of training. Strength was measured as maximal torque on a Cybex dynamometer before and after the training period. RESULTS: In the NH group, there was an 11% increase in eccentric hamstring torque measured at 60 degrees s(-1), as well as a 7% increase in isometric hamstring strength at 90 degrees, 60 degrees and 30 degrees of knee flexion. Since there was no effect on concentric quadriceps strength, there was a significant increase in the hamstrings:quadriceps ratio from 0.89 +/- 0.12 to 0.98 +/- 0.17 (11%) in the NH group. No changes were observed in the HC group. CONCLUSION: NH training for 10 weeks more effectively develops maximal eccentric hamstring strength in well-trained soccer players than a comparable program based on traditional HC.
PubMed ID
15387805 View in PubMed
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Activity of the positive and negative reinforcement motivation systems and baseline arterial blood pressure in humans.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature91971
Source
Neurosci Behav Physiol. 2008 Oct;38(8):799-806
Publication Type
Article
Date
Oct-2008
Author
Aftanas L I
Sidorova P V
Pavlov S V
Makhnev V P
Korenek V V
Reva N V
Amstislavskaya T G
Author Affiliation
Psychophysiology Laboratory, State Research Institute of Physiology, Siberian Branch, Russian Academy of Medical Sciences, 4 Timakov Street, 630117, Novosibirsk, Russia.
Source
Neurosci Behav Physiol. 2008 Oct;38(8):799-806
Date
Oct-2008
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Blood Pressure - physiology
Electromyography
Emotions - physiology
Galvanic Skin Response - physiology
Heart Rate - physiology
Hemodynamics - physiology
Humans
Male
Motivation
Muscle Contraction - physiology
Oculomotor Muscles - physiology
Photic Stimulation
Reinforcement (Psychology)
Smoking - physiopathology
Startle Reaction - physiology
Young Adult
Abstract
The aim of the present work was to identify possible associations between individual balances in the activity of the positive and negative reinforcement motivation systems using a method based on emotional modulation of the startle reaction (EMSR) by motivationally significant emotionally positive and negative contextual visual stimuli and measures of cardiovascular system activity. Studies were performed using healthy males (mean age 30.29 +/- 9.8 years) with normal and first-episode excessive increases in arterial blood pressure (systolic blood pressure to greater than 140 mmHg, diastolic to greater than 90 mmHg). Cluster analysis of EMSR data identified groups of individuals with different activity profiles for the positive and negative reinforcement systems. Groups of subjects with changes in the balance of activity towards a lower level of positive reinforcement system activity (smaller startle reflexes to positive contextual stimuli) or a higher level of negative reinforcement system activity (larger startle reactions to threatening contextual stimuli) showed significantly greater baseline SBP and DBP. The possible mechanisms of the modulatory influences of the balance of system activities on autonomic vascular regulatory processes are discussed.
PubMed ID
18802770 View in PubMed
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Adaptation of pharyngeal wall adduction after pharyngeal flap surgery.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature33381
Source
Cleft Palate Craniofac J. 1999 Mar;36(2):166-72
Publication Type
Article
Date
Mar-1999
Author
J. Karling
G. Henningsson
O. Larson
A. Isberg
Author Affiliation
Department of Logopedics and Phoniatrics, Karolinska Hospital, Stockholm, Sweden. jkng@ent.ks.se
Source
Cleft Palate Craniofac J. 1999 Mar;36(2):166-72
Date
Mar-1999
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adaptation, Physiological
Adolescent
Adult
Child
Child, Preschool
Endoscopy
Female
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Movement
Pharyngeal Muscles - physiology
Pharynx - physiopathology - radiography - surgery
Prospective Studies
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Statistics, nonparametric
Surgical Flaps
Treatment Outcome
Velopharyngeal Insufficiency - physiopathology - surgery
Video Recording
Voice Disorders - surgery
Abstract
OBJECTIVE: The purpose of this investigation was to study lateral pharyngeal wall adduction relative to pharyngeal flaps of different widths. The hypothesis to be tested was that pharyngeal wall adduction does not increase postoperatively but may decrease due to the mechanical hindrance of a wide flap. DESIGN: In this prospective study, adaptation of lateral pharyngeal wall adduction during speech was studied relative to pharyngeal flaps of different widths utilizing videoradiography. Flap width was determined nasopharyngoscopically. SETTING: All patients were treated by the Stockholm Cleft Palate Team, Sweden. PATIENTS: Fifty-three patients were strictly selected by discarding conditions known to exert uncontrolled influence on velopharyngeal sphincter function. RESULTS: The results revealed a potential for adaptation of pharyngeal wall adduction to different flap widths. The magnitude and character (increase or decrease) of change in adduction was significantly correlated with the degree of preoperative adduction and with the width of the flap. In patients with limited preoperative adduction, pharyngeal wall activity increased, more in the presence of a narrow flap while less if the flap was wide. When preoperative adduction was pronounced, the postoperative activity decreased because of mechanical hindrance by the flap, and the degree of impediment was correlated to the width of the flap. CONCLUSION: A potential for increased lateral pharyngeal wall adduction after pharyngeal flap surgery was verified, but the result cannot be interpreted as generally applicable because of the strict selection of patients.
PubMed ID
10213063 View in PubMed
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Additional evidence for the psychometric soundness of the Drive for Muscularity Attitudes Questionnaire (DMAQ).

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature172600
Source
J Soc Psychol. 2005 Oct;145(5):618-20
Publication Type
Article
Date
Oct-2005
Author
Todd G Morrison
Rebecca L Harriman
Author Affiliation
Department of Psychology, National University of Ireland, Galway, Republic of Ireland. Todd.Morrison@nuigalway.ie
Source
J Soc Psychol. 2005 Oct;145(5):618-20
Date
Oct-2005
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Attitude
Body Image
Humans
Male
Muscles - physiology
Psychology, Social - instrumentation
Psychometrics - instrumentation
Questionnaires
Saskatchewan
Social Desirability
Students - psychology
PubMed ID
16201682 View in PubMed
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ADL-reduction and need for technical aids among 70-year-olds. From the population study of 70-year-olds in Göteborg.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature8637
Source
Compr Gerontol [B]. 1988 Apr;2(1):16-23
Publication Type
Article
Date
Apr-1988
Author
G. Gosman-Hedström
A. Aniansson
G B Persson
Author Affiliation
Dept. of Rehabilitation Medicine, Sahlgren's Hospital, Göteborg, Sweden.
Source
Compr Gerontol [B]. 1988 Apr;2(1):16-23
Date
Apr-1988
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Activities of Daily Living
Aged
Exercise
Female
Home Care Services
Homemaker Services
Humans
Locomotion
Male
Movement
Muscles - physiology
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Self-Help Devices
Sweden
Walkers
Abstract
Six hundred and nineteen persons from the population study of 70-year-olds "The intervention study of the elderly in Göteborg" (IVEG) were examined. They were interviewed in their home environment concerning their ability to manage activities of daily living (ADL), and the definition "ADL-reduction" is based on seven of these ADL-measurements. One third of the 70-year-old population had reduced ADL-capability, some only slightly. Joint disorders, paresis and congestive heart failure were the most common problems among the ADL-reduced subjects. Forty-three per cent of the ADL-reduced subjects (19% of total) received help with their personal care and/or housekeeping. One third had technical aid, mostly quite simple and inexpensive. Half were provided with new technical aids. The need for technical aids and home help service was noted and intervention undertaken as and when necessary. The needs were correlated to physical activity and performance in functional tests. The results do not illustrate the occurrence of handicap but are aimed at illustrating the special needs that elderly people may have in their normal surroundings.
PubMed ID
3180153 View in PubMed
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The adolescent back. A field survey of 370 Finnish schoolchildren.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature241274
Source
Acta Paediatr Scand Suppl. 1984;315:1-122
Publication Type
Article
Date
1984
Author
J J Salminen
Source
Acta Paediatr Scand Suppl. 1984;315:1-122
Date
1984
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Age Factors
Back - anatomy & histology - physiology
Back Pain - diagnosis - etiology - prevention & control
Child
Female
Finland
Humans
Male
Muscles - anatomy & histology - physiology
Neck Muscles - physiology
Physical Examination
Posture
School Health Services
Spine - anatomy & histology - physiology
Abstract
In this study, dealing with the early diagnosis and prevention of back pains, adolescent postural faults especially in the sagittal plane were examined with a standardized physical examination technique suitable for use in schools; the strength and flexibility of muscles affecting the back were investigated; neck and/or back symptoms were screened; and the association of background factors and the findings of the physical examination with symptoms was evaluated. The material consisted of a total of 370 11, 13, 15 and 17-year-old comprehensive and senior secondary school pupils from a small suburban municipality, selected by random sampling. The subjects were quite evenly distributed in terms of different age and sex groups. The physical examination of the back, with evaluation of symptoms, took place in the autumn of 1981 in the premises of school health care, and 58 of the examined subjects were referred on the basis of symptoms and/or findings to an X-ray examination of the thoracic and/or lumbar spine. The X-rays were taken in the spring of 1982. 1 Back pain history. Relation between present neck and/or back symptoms, background variables and findings in physical examination. 7.6% of the subjects reported previous neck and/or back symptoms that had interfered with their school work or leisure activities. Present, mainly mild neck and/or back symptoms were reported by 19.7%. Girls reported symptoms more often than boys (p less than 0.05), and the occurrence of symptoms increased with age (p less than 0.001). Roughly one third of the subjects had frequent symptoms. Pains were most often localized in the low back (p less than 0.001) and were most frequently associated with sitting or physical activities. Most subjects who had suffered from previous symptoms also reported symptoms at the time of the study. These more chronically symptomatic subjects accounted for 6.2% of the total material. 2.9% of siblings under 11 years, 8.0% of siblings 11-17 years, and 13.7% of siblings over 17 years of age had at some time prior to the study complained of recurrent neck and/or back symptoms. Of mothers, 19.0% and of fathers, 15.4% reported neck and/or back symptoms that were continual and/or reduced working ability. The mother (p less than 0.01) and/or the father (p less than 0.05) of a subject reporting frequent symptoms, also reported neck and/or back symptoms.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 400 WORDS)
PubMed ID
6241979 View in PubMed
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[Age-related variation of adductor weight in the japanese scallop Mizuhopecten yessoensis (Jay) depending on cultivation technique]

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature91486
Source
Izv Akad Nauk Ser Biol. 2008 Sep-Oct;(5):631-4
Publication Type
Article
Author
Pravdukhina O Iu
Kodolova O P
Source
Izv Akad Nauk Ser Biol. 2008 Sep-Oct;(5):631-4
Language
Russian
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aging - physiology
Animals
Muscles - physiology
Oceans and Seas
Organ Size - physiology
Pectinidae - growth & development
Siberia
Abstract
Age-related variation in the absolute and relative adductor weight has been studied for 8 years in six samples of Japanese scallops Mizuhopecten yessoensis (Jay) of different generations from a shellfish farm in Alekseev Bight, Sea of Japan. The test character has proved to vary widely within the samples, with variation in shell size being relatively low. It has been shown that the dependence of adductor weight on the age of the scallop is not absolute: even-aged samples from different generations may differ significantly in this character. It is assumed that this effect is due to the influence of environmental factors on the development of scallops at early stages, which is especially strong under conditions of dense spat planting in the course of cultivation.
PubMed ID
18956743 View in PubMed
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Altered knee joint neuromuscular control during landing from a jump in 10-15 year old children with Generalised Joint Hypermobility. A substudy of the CHAMPS-study Denmark.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature268916
Source
J Electromyogr Kinesiol. 2015 Jun;25(3):501-7
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-2015
Author
Tina Junge
Niels Wedderkopp
Jonas Bloch Thorlund
Karen Søgaard
Birgit Juul-Kristensen
Source
J Electromyogr Kinesiol. 2015 Jun;25(3):501-7
Date
Jun-2015
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Child
Cohort Studies
Denmark - epidemiology
Female
Humans
Joint Instability - diagnosis - epidemiology - physiopathology
Knee Joint - physiology - physiopathology
Longitudinal Studies
Male
Motor Activity - physiology
Muscle Contraction - physiology
Muscle, Skeletal - physiology - physiopathology
Quadriceps Muscle - physiology - physiopathology
Abstract
Generalised Joint Hypermobility (GJH) is considered an intrinsic risk factor for knee injuries. Knee neuromuscular control during landing may be altered in GJH due to reduced passive stability. The aim was to identify differences in knee neuromuscular control during landing of the Single-Leg-Hop-for-Distance test (SLHD) in 25 children with GJH compared to 29 children without GJH (controls), all 10-15years. Inclusion criteria for GJH: Beighton score?5/9 and minimum one hypermobile knee. EMG was recorded from the quadriceps, the hamstring and the calf muscles, presented relative to Maximum Voluntary Electrical activity (MVE). There was no difference in jump length between groups. Before landing, GJH had 33% lower Semitendinosus, but 32% higher Gastrocnemius Medialis activity and 39% higher co contraction of the lateral knee muscles, than controls. After landing, GJH had 36% lower Semitendinosus activity than controls, all significant findings. Although the groups performed equally in SLHD, GJH had a Gastrocnemius Medialis dominated neuromuscular strategy before landing, plausibly caused by reduced Semitendinosus activity. Reduced Semitendinosus activity was seen in GJH after landing, but with no compensatory Gastrocnemius Medialis activity. Reduced pre and post-activation of the Semitendinosus may present a risk factor for traumatic knee injuries as ACL ruptures in GJH with knee hypermobility.
PubMed ID
25801907 View in PubMed
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[Assessment of influence of breath holding and hyperventilation on human postural stability with spectral analysis of stabilographic signal].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature257302
Source
Fiziol Cheloveka. 2014 Jan-Feb;40(1):90-5
Publication Type
Article
Author
M V Malakhov
E A Makarenkova
A A Mel'nikov
A D Vikulov
Source
Fiziol Cheloveka. 2014 Jan-Feb;40(1):90-5
Language
Russian
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Breath Holding
Female
Humans
Hyperventilation
Male
Posture - physiology
Respiratory Muscles - physiology
Russia
Abstract
The influence of breath holding and voluntary hyperventilation on the classic stabilometric parameters and the frequency characteristic of stabilographic signal were studied. We measured the stabilometric parameters on the force platform ("Ritm", Russia) on the healthy volunteers (n = 107) during quiet breath, voluntary hyperventilation (20 seconds) and maximal inspiratory breath holding (20 seconds). Respiratory frequency, respiratory amplitude and ventilation were estimated with strain gauge. We found that antero-posterior and medio-lateral sway amplitude and velocity as well as sway surface at breath-holding and at quiet breathing were the same, so breath holding didn't influence the postural stability. However the spectral parameters shifted to the high frequency range due to alteration of the respiratory muscles contractions during breath-holding versus quiet breath. Voluntary hyperventilation caused significant increase of all stabilographic indices that implied an impairment of postural stability, which was due to the increase of respiration frequency and amplitude. We also found that the spectral indices moved toward the high-frequency range with more pronounced degree of this shift versus breath holding. Besides, amplitudes of spectral peaks also increased. Perhaps such change of spectral indices was due to distortion of proprioceptive information because of increased excitability of nerve fibers during hyperventilation. Maximal inspiration breath holding causes strain of the postural control mechanisms that is reflected as elevation of postural sway frequency with no postural stability changes. Hyperventilation leads to the most prominent strain of balance function and decrease of steadiness that is manifested as increase of center of pressure oscillations amplitude and frequency.
PubMed ID
25272773 View in PubMed
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Association between serum 25(OH)D concentrations and bone stress fractures in Finnish young men.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature167707
Source
J Bone Miner Res. 2006 Sep;21(9):1483-8
Publication Type
Article
Date
Sep-2006
Author
Juha-Petri Ruohola
Ilkka Laaksi
Timo Ylikomi
Riina Haataja
Ville M Mattila
Timo Sahi
Pentti Tuohimaa
Harri Pihlajamäki
Author Affiliation
Research Institute of Military Medicine, Helsinki, Finland. j-p.ruohola@pp.inet.fi
Source
J Bone Miner Res. 2006 Sep;21(9):1483-8
Date
Sep-2006
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Body Height
Body mass index
Body Weight
Calcifediol - blood
Finland - epidemiology
Follow-Up Studies
Fractures, Bone - epidemiology - etiology
Humans
Incidence
Male
Military Personnel - statistics & numerical data
Muscles - physiology
Prospective Studies
Statistics as Topic
Stress, mechanical
Tensile Strength
Abstract
Low vitamin D level may predict rickets, osteomalacia, or osteoporosis. We examined serum 25(OH)D concentration as a predisposing factor for bone stress fracture in 756 military recruits. The average serum 25(OH)D concentration was significantly lower in the group with fracture, suggesting a relationship between vitamin D and fatigue bone stress fracture.
Low vitamin D level may predict rickets, osteomalacia, or osteoporosis. Fatigue bone stress fracture is one of the most frequently seen types of overuse injuries in athletes and military recruits. An association was recently shown between vitamin D and BMC. A correlation has also been found between low femoral BMD and stress fractures. We measured serum 25(OH)D concentration in a population sample of military recruits to determine if vitamin D is a predisposing factor for fatigue bone stress fracture.
We prospectively followed 800 randomly selected, healthy Finnish military recruits with a mean age of 19 years for developing stress fractures in homogenous circumstances. Blood for serum 25(OH)D concentration was drawn at entry into military service, and the weight, height, body mass index (BMI), muscle strength, and 12-minute running were measured for all subjects. Serum 25(OH)D concentrations were measured with enzyme immunoassay. At end of the 90-day follow-up, 756 subjects completed the study. Subjects without fracture constituted controls.
Twenty-two recruits with stress fracture were identified (2.9%), the incidence being 11.6 (95% CI: 6.8-16.5) per 100 person-years. In the final multivariate analysis, the significant risk factor for stress fracture in conscripts was a below median serum 25(OH)D level (75.8 nM), OR being 3.6 (95% CI: 1.2-11.1). No significant associations between BMI (p = 0.255), age (p = 0.216), or smoking (p = 0.851) and bone stress fracture were found in this study population.
A lower level of serum 25(OH)D concentration may be a generally predisposing element for bone stress fractures. Considering the obvious need of additional vitamin D in prevention of stress fractures, the effects of vitamin D fortification of foods and supplementation will be subjects of interest for future research.
PubMed ID
16939407 View in PubMed
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98 records – page 1 of 10.