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1H-MRS Measured Ectopic Fat in Liver and Muscle in Danish Lean and Obese Children and Adolescents.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature273208
Source
PLoS One. 2015;10(8):e0135018
Publication Type
Article
Date
2015
Author
Cilius Esmann Fonvig
Elizaveta Chabanova
Ehm Astrid Andersson
Johanne Dam Ohrt
Oluf Pedersen
Torben Hansen
Henrik S Thomsen
Jens-Christian Holm
Source
PLoS One. 2015;10(8):e0135018
Date
2015
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Anthropometry
Blood Glucose - analysis
Blood pressure
Body mass index
Body Weight
Cardiovascular Diseases - physiopathology
Child
Cross-Sectional Studies
Denmark
Dyslipidemias - blood
Fatty Liver - pathology
Female
Humans
Insulin - blood
Insulin Resistance
Intra-Abdominal Fat - pathology
Linear Models
Lipids - blood
Liver - metabolism - pathology
Male
Muscles - pathology
Overweight
Pediatric Obesity - blood - pathology
Proton Magnetic Resonance Spectroscopy
Puberty
Sex Factors
Subcutaneous Fat - pathology
Abstract
This cross sectional study aims to investigate the associations between ectopic lipid accumulation in liver and skeletal muscle and biochemical measures, estimates of insulin resistance, anthropometry, and blood pressure in lean and overweight/obese children.
Fasting plasma glucose, serum lipids, serum insulin, and expressions of insulin resistance, anthropometry, blood pressure, and magnetic resonance spectroscopy of liver and muscle fat were obtained in 327 Danish children and adolescents aged 8-18 years.
In 287 overweight/obese children, the prevalences of hepatic and muscular steatosis were 31% and 68%, respectively, whereas the prevalences in 40 lean children were 3% and 10%, respectively. A multiple regression analysis adjusted for age, sex, body mass index z-score (BMI SDS), and pubertal development showed that the OR of exhibiting dyslipidemia was 4.2 (95%CI: [1.8; 10.2], p = 0.0009) when hepatic steatosis was present. Comparing the simultaneous presence of hepatic and muscular steatosis with no presence of steatosis, the OR of exhibiting dyslipidemia was 5.8 (95%CI: [2.0; 18.6], p = 0.002). No significant associations between muscle fat and dyslipidemia, impaired fasting glucose, or blood pressure were observed. Liver and muscle fat, adjusted for age, sex, BMI SDS, and pubertal development, associated to BMI SDS and glycosylated hemoglobin, while only liver fat associated to visceral and subcutaneous adipose tissue and intramyocellular lipid associated inversely to high density lipoprotein cholesterol.
Hepatic steatosis is associated with dyslipidemia and liver and muscle fat depositions are linked to obesity-related metabolic dysfunctions, especially glycosylated hemoglobin, in children and adolescents, which suggest an increased cardiovascular disease risk.
Notes
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PubMed ID
26252778 View in PubMed
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Acquired equine polyneuropathy of Nordic horses: A conspicuous inclusion body schwannopathy.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature292620
Source
Neuromuscul Disord. 2017 Oct; 27(10):931-941
Publication Type
Journal Article
Date
Oct-2017
Author
S Hanche-Olsen
K Matiasek
J Molín
M Rosati
C Hahn
K Hultin Jäderlund
G Gröndahl
Author Affiliation
Department of Companion Animal Clinical Sciences, Norwegian University of Life Sciences, Ullevålsvn 72, 0454 Oslo, Norway. Electronic address: siv.hanche-olsen@nmbu.no.
Source
Neuromuscul Disord. 2017 Oct; 27(10):931-941
Date
Oct-2017
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Keywords
Animals
Female
Horse Diseases - pathology
Horses
Male
Muscles - pathology
Norway
Polyneuropathies - etiology - pathology - veterinary
Schwann Cells - pathology
Sweden
Abstract
Acquired equine polyneuropathy (AEP), formerly also known as Scandinavian knuckling syndrome, is one of the most prevalent polyneuropathies in equids in Norway and Sweden, with more than 400 cases registered since first observations in 1995. Despite geographical clustering and an association to forage feeding, its aetiology remains unknown. Clinically AEP is characterized by knuckling due to dysfunction of metatarsophalangeal extensor muscles. This neuropathological study aimed to gain further insights in the pathobiology of AEP and its underlying aetiopathogenesis. We thereby confirmed that all affected horses suffered from similar large fibre neuropathy, exhibiting conspicuous Schwann cell inclusions in most samples, suggestive of a primary disruption of Schwann cell metabolism leading to inclusion body schwannopathy with secondary inflammatory changes. The degree of nerve pathology was not predictive of clinical outcome.
PubMed ID
28694072 View in PubMed
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Age trajectories of grip strength: cross-sectional and longitudinal data among 8,342 Danes aged 46 to 102.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature82925
Source
Ann Epidemiol. 2006 Jul;16(7):554-62
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jul-2006
Author
Frederiksen Henrik
Hjelmborg Jacob
Mortensen Jakob
McGue Matt
Vaupel James W
Christensen Kaare
Author Affiliation
Epidemiology, Institute of Public Health, University of Southern Denmark, Odense, Denmark. hfrederiksen@health.sdu.dk
Source
Ann Epidemiol. 2006 Jul;16(7):554-62
Date
Jul-2006
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Aging - pathology - physiology
Cross-Sectional Studies
Denmark - epidemiology
Female
Follow-Up Studies
Forearm - pathology
Hand
Hand Strength - physiology
Humans
Longitudinal Studies
Male
Middle Aged
Muscle Contraction
Muscles - pathology
Reference Values
Abstract
PURPOSE: The purpose is to study the age trajectory of hand-grip strength after the age of 45 years. METHODS: In this study, we use data from three large nationwide population-based surveys of Danes aged 45 to 102 years with a total of 8342 participants with grip-strength measurements and up to 4 years of follow-up. Grip strength was measured by using a portable hand dynamometer. RESULTS: Grip strength declines throughout life for both males and females, but among the oldest women, the longitudinal curve reaches a horizontal plateau. The course of the decline is estimated by using full information in the longitudinal data and is found to be almost linear in the age span of 50 to 85 years. In this age span, mean annual grip-strength loss is estimated to be 0.59 (0.02) (SE) kg for men and 0.31 (0.01) kg for women. CONCLUSION: This study confirms the previously reported grip-strength decline with increasing age. Estimates were obtained by using full-information methods from large population-representative studies. Equations of expected grip strength, as well as tables with sex-, age-, and height-stratified reference data, provide an opportunity to include grip-strength measurement in clinical care in similar populations.
PubMed ID
16406245 View in PubMed
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An evaluation of the TNM classification in cancer of the breast.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature254507
Source
Int J Cancer. 1973 Jul 15;12(1):301-8
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jul-15-1973

Are young female gymnasts malnourished? An anthropometric, electrophysiological, and histological study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature62367
Source
Eur J Appl Physiol Occup Physiol. 1984;52(4):457-62
Publication Type
Article
Date
1984
Author
C F Lindboe
M. Slettebø
Source
Eur J Appl Physiol Occup Physiol. 1984;52(4):457-62
Date
1984
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Anthropometry
Body Weight
Comparative Study
Electrophysiology
Female
Gymnastics
Humans
Muscles - pathology - physiology
Nutrition Disorders - diagnosis - pathology
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Abstract
Competitive rhythmic sportive gymnastics have been accused of promoting an unphysiologic weight reduction which may progress to manifest anorexia nervosa. In this study, eight young female gymnasts who represented Norway in the European Championships in Rhythmic Sportive Gymnastics 1982 were examined for evidence of malnutrition. Ten girls, matched for age and height, served as controls. The examination included registration of anthropometric data (height, weight, and body-mass index), motor and sensory neurography and biopsies of the vastus lateralis muscle with exact measurements of muscle fibre areas on sections stained for myofibrillar ATPase activity. The mean body weight of the gymnasts did not differ from that of the control group or of a large series of age matched Norwegian females. This finding excludes the possibility of general malnutrition among the examined gymnasts. Muscle fibres of both types 1 and 2 were found to be smaller in the gymnasts than in the controls, with values of 3,404 microns2 vs 3,811 microns2 for type-1 fibres and 2,985 microns2 vs 3,942 microns2 for type-2 fibres respectively. Although contradictory to most previous reports, this finding suggests that the reduction in fibre size among the gymnasts might be an effect of physical training. There were some differences in neurographic parameters between the groups, but the mean values were all within normal ranges. The motor nerve conduction velocity in the proximal segments of the median and ulnar nerves was significantly slower in the gymnasts and, as a possible consequence of smaller muscle fibres, the motor responses were generally less in this group.
PubMed ID
6540676 View in PubMed
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Association Between Clinical Signs of Temporomandibular Disorders and Psychological Distress Among an Adult Finnish Population.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature269758
Source
J Oral Facial Pain Headache. 2015;29(4):370-7
Publication Type
Article
Date
2015
Author
Lauri Tuuliainen
Kirsi Sipilä
Pirjo Mäki
Mauno Könönen
Anna Liisa Suominen
Source
J Oral Facial Pain Headache. 2015;29(4):370-7
Date
2015
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Age Factors
Aged
Confounding Factors (Epidemiology)
Facial Pain - epidemiology
Female
Finland - epidemiology
Humans
Male
Masticatory Muscles - pathology
Middle Aged
Myalgia - epidemiology
Palpation
Population Surveillance
Prevalence
Sex Factors
Stress, Psychological - epidemiology
Temporomandibular Joint Disorders - epidemiology
Abstract
To evaluate the association between signs of temporomandibular disorders (TMD) and psychological distress in a general population-based sample of Finnish adults.
The Health 2000 Survey was conducted in 2000-2001 by the National Institute for Health and Welfare in Finland. Of the sample of adults aged 30 or over (n=8,028), 79% participated in a clinical oral health examination, which included examination of TMD signs. The participants (n=6,155) also completed questionnaires, including the 12-item General Health Questionnaire (GHQ-12), which measured psychological distress. Associations between TMD signs and psychological distress measured by the GHQ-12 were examined in both genders. Statistical measures included chi-square tests, t tests, and logistic regression analyses.
The prevalence of the TMD signs (limited opening, clicking, crepitation, temporomandibular joint [TMJ] palpation pain, and muscle palpation pain) was 11.2%, 17.6%, 10.5%, 5.1%, and 18.9% in women, and 6.1%, 12.9%, 5.3%, 2.4%, and 7.2% in men, respectively. High GHQ-12 scores, measured as continuous variables and in quartiles by distress level, were significantly associated with masticatory muscle pain on palpation in both genders (P
PubMed ID
26485384 View in PubMed
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Brief communication: state of preservation of tissues from ancient human remains found in a glacier in Canada.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature156280
Source
Am J Phys Anthropol. 2008 Nov;137(3):348-55
Publication Type
Article
Date
Nov-2008
Author
Maria Victoria Monsalve
Elaine Humphrey
David C Walker
Claudia Cheung
Wayne Vogl
Mike Nimmo
Author Affiliation
Department of Pathology and Laboratory Medicine, University of British Columbia, Vancouver, British Columbia V6T 1Z3, Canada. vmonsalve@pathology.ubc.ca
Source
Am J Phys Anthropol. 2008 Nov;137(3):348-55
Date
Nov-2008
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Bone and Bones - pathology - ultrastructure
Canada
Collagen - analysis - ultrastructure
DNA, Mitochondrial - chemistry
Epithelium - pathology - ultrastructure
Humans
Ice Cover
Mummies - pathology
Muscles - pathology - ultrastructure
Peripheral Nerves - pathology - ultrastructure
Sequence Analysis, DNA
Abstract
Ancient remains preserved in glaciers present a unique opportunity for us to advance our knowledge of human origins, diversity, and health, a central focus of anthropological studies. Cellular components of hard and soft tissue from frozen human remains dated between 1670 to 1850 cal AD recovered from a glacier in Canada were studied. Despite the expected ice crystal damage in some samples, regions of recognizable structure and ultrastructure were observed. We found that the state of preservation was tissue specific and that in some tissues the organelles were better preserved than in others. Skeletal, connective, nervous, and epithelial tissues were recognizable in some of the samples. DNA had been previously extracted from these remains and this study illustrates that the ability to successfully extract DNA may correlate with good preservation of histology.
PubMed ID
18609593 View in PubMed
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Changes in the main masticatory muscles in CT after mandibular condyle fracture.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature228127
Source
Rofo. 1990 Nov;153(5):501-4
Publication Type
Article
Date
Nov-1990
Author
A M Raustia
K S Oikarinen
J. Pyhtinen
Author Affiliation
Department of Prosthodontics, University of Oulu, Finland.
Source
Rofo. 1990 Nov;153(5):501-4
Date
Nov-1990
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Finland - epidemiology
Follow-Up Studies
Humans
Mandibular Condyle - injuries
Mandibular Fractures - complications - epidemiology
Masticatory Muscles - pathology - radiography
Middle Aged
Tomography, X-Ray Computed
Abstract
The aim was to study changes in the main masticatory muscles after mandibular condyle fracture as seen by CT, comparing the densities and sizes of the masseter, medial pterygoid and lateral pterygoid muscles on the fractured side with those on the non-fractured side. More or less permanent muscular changes are detectable several years after the accident, especially in the lateral pterygoid muscle, which is attached to the condylar head. This muscle was statistically significantly smaller (p less than 0.001) on the fractured side. Examination of the masticatory muscles immediately after the fracture and at intervals afterwards could reveal more about the pathogenesis of the changes in these muscles.
PubMed ID
2173052 View in PubMed
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Childhood encephalopathies and myopathies: a prospective study in a defined population to assess the frequency of mitochondrial disorders.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature32917
Source
Pediatrics. 2000 Mar;105(3 Pt 1):598-603
Publication Type
Article
Date
Mar-2000
Author
J. Uusimaa
A M Remes
H. Rantala
L. Vainionpää
R. Herva
K. Vuopala
M. Nuutinen
K. Majamaa
I E Hassinen
Author Affiliation
Departments of Medical Biochemistry, University of Oulu, Finland.
Source
Pediatrics. 2000 Mar;105(3 Pt 1):598-603
Date
Mar-2000
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Biopsy
Child
Child, Preschool
Cross-Sectional Studies
DNA, Mitochondrial - genetics
Female
Finland - epidemiology
Gene Frequency - genetics
Genetics, Population
Humans
Infant
MELAS Syndrome - epidemiology - genetics - pathology
Male
Microscopy, Electron
Mitochondria, Muscle - pathology
Mitochondrial Encephalomyopathies - epidemiology - genetics - pathology
Muscle, Skeletal - pathology
Prospective Studies
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Abstract
OBJECTIVES: To assess the frequency of mitochondrial abnormalities in muscle histology, defects in respiratory chain enzyme activities, and mutations in mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) in children with unexplained psychomotor retardation in the population of Northern Finland. BACKGROUND: The frequency of mitochondrial diseases among patients with childhood encephalopathies and myopathies is not known. Frequencies are difficult to estimate because the clinical presentation of these disorders is variable. METHODS: A total of 116 consecutive patients with undefined encephalopathies and myopathies were enrolled during a 7-year period in a hospital serving as the only neurologic unit for a pediatric population of 97 609 and as the only tertiary level neurologic unit for a pediatric population of 48 873. Biochemical and morphologic investigations were performed on muscle biopsy material, including oximetric and spectrophotometric analyses of oxidative phosphorylation, histochemistry, electron microscopy, and molecular analysis of mtDNA. RESULTS: Ultrastructural changes in the mitochondria were the most common finding in the muscle biopsies (71%). Ragged-red fibers were found in 4 cases. An oxidative phosphorylation defect was found in 26 children (28%), complex I (n = 15) and complex IV (n = 13) defects being the most common. Fifteen percent of patients (n = 17/116) with unexplained encephalomyopathy or myopathy had a probable mitochondrial disease. Common pathogenic mutations were found in the mtDNA of only 1 patient (.9%). CONCLUSIONS: The common known mutations in mtDNA are rarely causes of childhood encephalomyopathies, which is in contrast to the considerable frequency of the common MELAS mutation observed among adults in the same geographical area. Biochemically and morphologically verified mitochondrial disorders were nevertheless common among the children, making the analysis of a muscle biopsy very important for clinical diagnostic purposes.
PubMed ID
10699115 View in PubMed
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A comparison of physical characteristics between patients seeking treatment for neck pain and age-matched healthy people.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature72685
Source
J Manipulative Physiol Ther. 1997 Sep;20(7):468-75
Publication Type
Article
Date
Sep-1997
Author
A. Jordan
J. Mehlsen
K. Ostergaard
Author Affiliation
Department of Clinical Physiology, Frederiksberg Hospital, Denmark.
Source
J Manipulative Physiol Ther. 1997 Sep;20(7):468-75
Date
Sep-1997
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Case-Control Studies
Female
Humans
Isometric Contraction
Male
Middle Aged
Neck Muscles - pathology - physiopathology
Neck Pain - pathology - physiopathology
Patient Acceptance of Health Care
Physical Endurance
Range of Motion, Articular
Reproducibility of Results
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Torque
Abstract
OBJECTIVE: To compare physical characteristics of the cervical musculature, including maximal isometric strength of the flexors and extensors, relative isometric endurance of the extensors and the active range of motion (ROM) in extension in a group of patients seeking treatment for chronic neck pain and a group of age-matched healthy people. SETTING: Department of Medical Orthopedics, National University Hospital, Denmark. METHODS: One hundred and nineteen chronic neck-pain patients underwent physical testing for active ROM in extension, maximal isometric torque in extension and flexion and relative isometric endurance in extension before entering a clinical controlled trial studying the treatment of chronic neck pain. Their results were then compared with those of 80 age-matched healthy people. RESULTS: The reliability study demonstrated good within-day and day-to-day reproducibility for active ROM. Active ROM was significantly reduced in female patients, but not in all male age groups. Patients exhibited clinically and statistically significant reductions in maximal isometric torque in both the flexors and extensors of the cervical spine, with the greatest reduction seen in the extensor muscle group. Most patient groups demonstrated a significant reduction in relative isometric endurance of the extensors. CONCLUSIONS: In agreement with most low-back comparisons between patients and age-matched healthy people, the greatest relative muscular deficiencies seem to be in the extensor muscle group. Additionally, most patients exhibit a significant decrease in active ROM during extension. The clinical utility of physical measurements has not been firmly established.
PubMed ID
9310902 View in PubMed
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48 records – page 1 of 5.