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Ambient temperature and neck EMG with +Gz loading on a trampoline.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature162975
Source
Aviat Space Environ Med. 2007 Jun;78(6):574-8
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-2007
Author
Roope Sovelius
Juha Oksa
Harri Rintala
Heini Huhtala
Simo Siitonen
Author Affiliation
Training Air Wing, P.O. Box 5, FIN-62201 Kauhava, Finland. roope.sovelius@mil.fi
Source
Aviat Space Environ Med. 2007 Jun;78(6):574-8
Date
Jun-2007
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Aerospace Medicine
Cold Temperature - adverse effects
Electromyography
Female
Finland
Humans
Hypergravity
Male
Military Personnel
Muscle Tonus - physiology
Neck Muscles - injuries - physiopathology
Seasons
Skin Temperature - physiology
Abstract
Fighter pilots who are frequently exposed to severe cold ambient temperatures experience neck pain disabilities and occupational disorders more often than those who are not so exposed. We hypothesized that a cold-induced increase in muscle strain might lead to in-flight neck injuries. The aims of this study were to measure the level of cooling before takeoff and to determine muscle strain under Gz loading (0 to +4 Gz) at different temperatures.
Test subjects' (n = 14) skin temperature (T(skin)) over the trapezoids was measured before the walk to the aircraft and again in the cockpit (air temperature -14 degrees C). The subjects then performed trampoline exercises in two different ambient temperatures (-2 degrees C and +21 degrees C) after a 30-min period at the respective temperatures. EMG activity of the sternocleidomastoid (SCM), cervical erector spinae (CES), trapezoid (TRA), thoracic erector spinae (TES) muscles, and Tskin of the SCM and TRA were measured.
Tskin over the trapezoids decreased from 30.1 +/- 1.7 degrees C to 27.8 +/- 2.6 degrees C (p
PubMed ID
17571657 View in PubMed
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Feasibility of an 18 months' physical training program for middle-aged men and its effect on physical fitness.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature253513
Source
Am J Public Health. 1974 May;64(5):459-65
Publication Type
Article
Date
May-1974
Author
P. Oja
P. Teräslinna
T. Partanen
R. Kärävä
Source
Am J Public Health. 1974 May;64(5):459-65
Date
May-1974
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Attitude
Coronary Disease - prevention & control
Finland
Gymnastics
Humans
Leg Injuries - epidemiology
Male
Middle Aged
Muscles - injuries
Oxygen consumption
Patient Dropouts
Physical Education and Training
Physical Fitness
Seasons
Sports
Time Factors
Notes
Cites: Med Serv J Can. 1965 Sep;21(8):533-445322264
Cites: J Gerontol. 1966 Apr;21(2):182-915930512
Cites: J Appl Physiol. 1966 Mar;21(2):513-55934456
Cites: Can Med Assoc J. 1967 Mar 25;96(12):895-9006020894
Cites: J Appl Physiol. 1968 Apr;24(4):518-284230646
Cites: Int Z Angew Physiol. 1967;24(1):18-235592858
Cites: Scand J Clin Lab Invest. 1969 Dec;24(4):315-225383326
Cites: Scand J Clin Lab Invest. 1969 Dec;24(4):323-345383327
Cites: J Sports Med Phys Fitness. 1969 Dec;9(4):224-95377146
Cites: J Sports Med Phys Fitness. 1970 Sep;10(3):138-445531908
Cites: Soc Sci Med. 1971 Jun;5(3):243-505093119
Cites: Am J Med. 1969 Jan;46(1):12-274951420
Cites: Arbeitsphysiologie. 1952;14(6):499-50414953193
Cites: J Sports Med Phys Fitness. 1964 Jun;30:87-9314180744
Cites: JAMA. 1965 Jan 11;191:103-414233225
PubMed ID
4818085 View in PubMed
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Groin and abdominal strain injuries in the National Hockey League.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature200673
Source
Clin J Sport Med. 1999 Jul;9(3):151-6
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jul-1999
Author
C A Emery
W H Meeuwisse
J W Powell
Author Affiliation
Department of Community Health Sciences, Faculty of Medicine, and Sport Medicine Centre, University of Calgary, Alberta, Canada.
Source
Clin J Sport Med. 1999 Jul;9(3):151-6
Date
Jul-1999
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Abdominal Muscles - injuries
Adolescent
Adult
Age Distribution
Canada - epidemiology
Groin - injuries
Hockey - injuries
Humans
Incidence
Injury Severity Score
Male
Retrospective Studies
Risk factors
Sampling Studies
Sprains and Strains - epidemiology - etiology
Abstract
To analyze groin and abdominal strain injuries retrospectively among elite male hockey players in the National Hockey League (NHL) over six seasons of play (1991/92 to 1996/97).
Retrospective case series design.
The NHL.
The NHL participants were an inclusive sample of 7,050 NHL hockey players who played in the NHL from the 1991/92 to the 1996/97 seasons. A subset of 2,600 NHL hockey players who played from the 1995/96 to the 1996/97 seasons was further analyzed.
The injury definition for groin/abdominal strain injury included any injury recorded as a muscle strain injury involving a muscle in any of the abdominal, hip flexor, or hip adductor muscle groups. Femoral, abdominal, and inguinal hernias were also included. Cumulative incidence rates over six seasons of play in the NHL and incidence densities over two seasons of play in the NHL are reported. Specific injury parameters examined included muscle region, time in season, type of session, reinjury, time period in session, position of play, player's experience, mechanism of injury, and time loss.
A total of 617 groin/abdominal strain injuries were reported in the NHL over six seasons of play. The cumulative incidence rate in the NHL increased over 6 years of play from 12.99 injuries/100 players/year in the 1991/92 season to 19.87 injuries/100 players/year in the 1996/97 season. The rate of increase was 1.32 (95% confidence interval -0.58, 3.21) injuries/100 players/year. The incidence density of groin/abdominal injury during NHL training camp was five times that during the regular season and 20 times that during the postseason. The incidence density in the NHL during games was six times that during practice. The majority of injuries reported were adductor groin muscle strains. The proportion of injuries reported that were recurrent was 23.5%. There was no significant difference in proportion of injuries reported by time period within a session. The mechanism of injury recorded was noncontact in nature in >90% of injuries reported. Mean time loss due to injury was significantly greater for abdominal injuries (10.59 sessions) than for groin injuries (6.59 sessions). A conservative estimate of the impact of groin/abdominal injury on each NHL team is a game loss of 25 player games/year.
The impact of groin and abdominal strain injury at an elite level of play in hockey is significant and increasing. Future research in this area is needed to identify risk factors and potentially implement prevention strategies to reduce groin and abdominal strain injury at all levels of play.
PubMed ID
10512343 View in PubMed
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(Mis)perceptions about intimate partner violence in women presenting for orthopaedic care: a survey of Canadian orthopaedic surgeons.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature156372
Source
J Bone Joint Surg Am. 2008 Jul;90(7):1590-7
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jul-2008
Author
Mohit Bhandari
Sheila Sprague
Paul Tornetta
Valerie D'Aurora
Emil Schemitsch
Heather Shearer
Ole Brink
David Mathews
Sonia Dosanjh
Author Affiliation
Division of Orthopaedic Surgery, Department of Clinical Epidemiology and Biostatistics, McMaster University, 6 North, 237 Barton Street East, Hamilton, ON L8L 2X2, Canada. bhandam@mcmaster.ca
Source
J Bone Joint Surg Am. 2008 Jul;90(7):1590-7
Date
Jul-2008
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Attitude of Health Personnel
Bone and Bones - injuries
Canada
Data Collection
Domestic Violence
Female
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Muscles - injuries
Orthopedics
Physicians
Questionnaires
Abstract
Domestic violence is the most common cause of nonfatal injury to women in North America. In a review of 144 such injuries, the second most common manifestation of intimate partner violence was musculoskeletal injuries (28%). The American Academy of Orthopaedic Surgeons is explicit that orthopaedic surgeons should play a role in the screening and appropriate identification of victims. We aimed to identify the perceptions, attitudes, and knowledge of Canadian orthopaedic surgeons with regard to intimate partner violence.
We surveyed members of the Canadian Orthopaedic Association to identify attitudes toward intimate partner violence. With use of a systematic random sample, 362 surgeons were mailed questionnaires. The questionnaire consisted of three sections: (1) the general attitude of the orthopaedic surgeon toward intimate partner violence, (2) the attitude of the orthopaedic surgeon toward victims and batterers, and (3) the clinical relevance of intimate partner violence in orthopaedic surgery. Up to three follow-up mailings were performed to enhance response rates.
A total of 186 orthopaedic surgeons responded (a response rate of 51%), and 167 (91%) of them were men. Most orthopaedic surgeons (95%) estimated that
PubMed ID
18594110 View in PubMed
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Orthopedic diseases and trauma in Finland. Trends in consumption of health services 1970-1985.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature227482
Source
Acta Orthop Scand Suppl. 1991;241:13-6
Publication Type
Article
Date
1991
Author
P. Slätis
A. Ruusinen
Author Affiliation
Orthopedic Hospital, Invalid Foundation, Helsinki, Finland.
Source
Acta Orthop Scand Suppl. 1991;241:13-6
Date
1991
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Absenteeism
Adolescent
Adult
Aged
Bone Diseases - epidemiology
Bone and Bones - injuries
Child
Finland - epidemiology
Health Services - utilization
Humans
Joint Diseases - epidemiology
Length of Stay
Middle Aged
Muscles - injuries
Muscular Diseases - epidemiology
Patient Admission
Population Surveillance
Workers' Compensation
Wounds and Injuries - epidemiology
Abstract
From 1970 to 1985, the total number of hospital admissions in Finland increased by 36 per cent, the number of admissions due to musculoskeletal disorders by 121 percent, and the admissions due to trauma by 38 percent. The combined share of musculoskeletal disorders and trauma in hospitals will grow to an estimated 18 percent of all the admissions by the year 2000. Of all the early pensions granted by the Social Insurance Institution, the share of musculoskeletal disorders as the main cause increased from 16 percent in 1970 to 25 percent in 1985.
PubMed ID
1826586 View in PubMed
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Preventing disability from occupational musculoskeletal injuries in an urban, acute and tertiary care hospital: results from a prevention and early active return-to-work safely program.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature177017
Source
J Occup Environ Med. 2004 Dec;46(12):1253-62
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-2004
Author
Philip Mark Davis
Maziar Badii
Annalee Yassi
Author Affiliation
Occupational Health and Safety Agency for Healthcare, 301-1195 West Broadway, Vancouver, British Columbia V6H 3X5, Canada.
Source
J Occup Environ Med. 2004 Dec;46(12):1253-62
Date
Dec-2004
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Absenteeism
British Columbia - epidemiology
Hospitals, Urban - organization & administration - statistics & numerical data
Humans
Incidence
Joints - injuries
Maintenance and Engineering, Hospital - statistics & numerical data
Muscles - injuries
Nurses - statistics & numerical data
Occupational Diseases - epidemiology - prevention & control
Occupational Health Services - organization & administration - statistics & numerical data
Organizational Culture
Personnel, Hospital - statistics & numerical data
Program Evaluation
Sprains and Strains - epidemiology - prevention & control
Work Capacity Evaluation
Workers' Compensation - statistics & numerical data
Abstract
Healthcare workers are at high risk for musculoskeletal injuries. A program was developed to decrease the incidence of musculoskeletal injuries and the duration of associated time loss.
A program combining primary prevention and on-site early intervention was implemented at a large, urban hospital. Incidence rates were compared using Poisson regression. Cox regression was used to analyze the time to return to regular duties.
Although there was no reduction in incidence, the program was effective in returning injured employees to work more promptly for registered nurses and health science professionals (therapists, technicians), although not for facility support staff.
Overall savings in time loss and compensation payments were realized. However, better integration of prevention and follow-up efforts are needed, and greater attention to the sociopolitical environment is required to improve outcomes for facility support staff.
PubMed ID
15591977 View in PubMed
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Sensory and electromyographic mapping during delayed-onset muscle soreness.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature93747
Source
Med Sci Sports Exerc. 2008 Feb;40(2):326-34
Publication Type
Article
Date
Feb-2008
Author
Hedayatpour Nosratollah
Falla Deborah
Arendt-Nielsen Lars
Farina Dario
Author Affiliation
Centre for Sensory-Motor Interaction (SMI), Department of Health Science and Technology, Aalborg University, Fredrik Bajers Vej 7 D-3, Aalborg, Denmark.
Source
Med Sci Sports Exerc. 2008 Feb;40(2):326-34
Date
Feb-2008
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Denmark
Electromyography - methods
Exercise Test - methods
Humans
Isometric Contraction - physiology
Male
Pain - physiopathology
Pain Threshold - physiology
Quadriceps Muscle - injuries
Abstract
PURPOSE: The aim of this human study was to apply novel topographical mapping techniques to investigate sensory and EMG manifestations of delayed-onset muscle soreness (DOMS) in multiple locations of the quadriceps. METHODS: Bipolar surface EMG signals were recorded from 11 healthy men with 15 pairs of electrodes located at 10, 20, 30, 40, and 50% of the distance from the medial, superior, and lateral border of the patella to the anterior superior iliac spine. Subjects performed sustained isometric knee extensions at 40% of the maximal force (MVC) until task failure before, 24 h, and 48 h after eccentric exercise. Pressure-pain thresholds (PPT) were assessed at the 15 locations where the EMG was recorded. RESULTS: Time to task failure was reduced after the eccentric exercise (mean +/- SD, 56.6 +/- 23 s before the eccentric exercise; 34.3 +/- 18.9 s at 24 h after exercise; and 34.3 +/- 14.4 s at 48 h after exercise). During the postexercise sustained contractions, EMG average rectified value (ARV) significantly decreased over time (P
PubMed ID
18202568 View in PubMed
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A sport-physiological perspective on bird migration: evidence for flight-induced muscle damage.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature5287
Source
J Exp Biol. 2001 Aug;204(Pt 15):2683-90
Publication Type
Article
Date
Aug-2001
Author
C G Guglielmo
T. Piersma
T D Williams
Author Affiliation
Centre for Wildlife Ecology and Behavioural Ecology Research Group, Department of Biological Sciences, Simon Fraser University, Burnaby, BC, V5A 1S6 Canada. cgugliel@selway.umt.edu
Source
J Exp Biol. 2001 Aug;204(Pt 15):2683-90
Date
Aug-2001
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aging
Animals
Behavior, Animal - physiology
Birds - physiology
Creatine Kinase - blood
Flight, Animal
Muscles - injuries
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Seasons
Abstract
Exercise-induced muscle damage is a well-described consequence of strenuous exercise, but its potential importance in the evolution of animal activity patterns is unknown. We used plasma creatine kinase (CK) activity as an indicator of muscle damage to investigate whether the high intensity, long-duration flights of two migratory shorebird species cause muscle damage that must be repaired during stopover. In two years of study, plasma CK activity was significantly higher in migrating western sandpipers (a non-synchronous, short-hop migrant), than in non-migrants. Similarly, in the bar-tailed godwit (a synchronous, long-jump migrant), plasma CK activity was highest immediately after arrival from a 4000-5000km flight from West Africa to The Netherlands, and declined before departure for the arctic breeding areas. Late-arriving godwits had higher plasma CK activity than birds that had been at the stopover site longer. Juvenile western sandpipers making their first southward migration had higher plasma CK activity than adults. These results indicate that muscle damage occurs during migration, and that it is exacerbated in young, relatively untrained birds. However, the magnitude of the increases in plasma CK activity associated with migratory flight were relatively small, suggesting that the level of muscle damage is moderate. Migrants may avoid damage behaviourally, or have efficient biochemical and physiological defences against muscle injury.
PubMed ID
11533118 View in PubMed
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Sports-related injuries in elderly men still active in sports.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature218781
Source
Br J Sports Med. 1994 Mar;28(1):52-5
Publication Type
Article
Date
Mar-1994
Author
M. Kallinen
M. Alén
Author Affiliation
LIKES-Research Centre for Physical Culture and Health, Jyväskylä, Finland.
Source
Br J Sports Med. 1994 Mar;28(1):52-5
Date
Mar-1994
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Accidental Falls - statistics & numerical data
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Ankle Injuries - epidemiology
Athletic Injuries - epidemiology - etiology
Cumulative Trauma Disorders - epidemiology
Finland - epidemiology
Foot Injuries
Humans
Joints - injuries
Knee Injuries - epidemiology
Male
Muscles - injuries - physiology
Oxygen Consumption - physiology
Physical Endurance - physiology
Skiing - physiology
Sports - physiology
Sprains and Strains - epidemiology
Track and Field - physiology
Abstract
By means of a questionnaire with a complementary interview and physical examination, the site and nature of sports injuries were investigated over a 10-year period (1977-1987) in 97 elderly athletes (age range 70-81 years). The athletes were still active in training and competition with a mean competition background of 15 years. Of the subjects studied 30 were strength/power athletes and the remaining 67 endurance athletes. Altogether we found 273 sports-related injuries (169 acute and 104 overuse injuries). Of the injuries 75% had occurred in the lower extremities. The most commonly injured part of the body was the knee (20% of all cases). Sprains of the thigh and knee were the most frequent types of acute injury. In most cases the treatment prescribed was rest and physiotherapy. Surgery had been necessary in ten cases (3.7% of all injuries). Mean withdrawal from normal sporting activity had, in general, been 2-3 weeks. Of the injuries, one in five had, however, lasted over several years causing some disability during sporting activities.
Notes
Cites: Ann N Y Acad Sci. 1977;301:656-70270945
Cites: Age Ageing. 1989 Jul;18(4):263-702816560
Cites: Acta Physiol Scand. 1980 Mar;108(3):263-87376921
Cites: Am J Sports Med. 1986 May-Jun;14(3):218-243752362
Cites: Am J Sports Med. 1989 Mar-Apr;17(2):187-962667376
PubMed ID
7913857 View in PubMed
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12 records – page 1 of 2.