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283 records – page 1 of 29.

Acculturation and the biology of aging.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature2334
Source
Pages 45-48 in R. Fortuine, ed. Circumpolar Health 84. Proceedings of the International Symposium on Circumpolar Health, 6th, Anchorage, 13-18 May, 1984. University of Washington Press, Seattle.
Publication Type
Article
Date
1985
clearly established and recorded, both in the disc lists and in the parish registers of the Catholic and Anglican churches. Cross-sectional studies of the aging of aerobic power, body composition and muscle strength were undertaken on the majority of people over the age of 9 years (some 75% of men
  1 document  
Author
Shephard, R.J.
Rode, A.
Author Affiliation
University of Toronto
Source
Pages 45-48 in R. Fortuine, ed. Circumpolar Health 84. Proceedings of the International Symposium on Circumpolar Health, 6th, Anchorage, 13-18 May, 1984. University of Washington Press, Seattle.
Date
1985
Geographic Location
Canada
Publication Type
Article
Digital File Format
Text - PDF
Physical Holding
Alaska Medical Library
Keywords
Acculturation
Aerobic power
Aging
Body fat
Igloolik
Maximum oxygen intake
Muscle strength
Notes
From: Fortuine, Robert et al. 1993. The Health of the Inuit of North America: A Bibliography from the Earliest Times through 1990. University of Alaska Anchorage. Citation number 985.
Documents
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Adaptations to Short, Frequent Sessions of Endurance and Strength Training Are Similar to Longer, Less Frequent Exercise Sessions When the Total Volume Is the Same.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature274072
Source
J Strength Cond Res. 2015 Nov;29 Suppl 11:S46-51
Publication Type
Article
Date
Nov-2015
Author
Anders Kilen
Line B Hjelvang
Niels Dall
Nanna L Kruse
Nikolai B Nordsborg
Source
J Strength Cond Res. 2015 Nov;29 Suppl 11:S46-51
Date
Nov-2015
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adaptation, physiological - physiology
Adult
Denmark
Exercise - physiology
Female
Humans
Male
Military Personnel
Muscle Strength - physiology
Muscle, Skeletal - physiology
Oxygen Consumption - physiology
Physical Conditioning, Human - methods
Resistance Training - methods
Abstract
The hypothesis that the distribution of weekly training across several short sessions, as opposed to fewer longer sessions, enhances maximal strength gain without compromising maximal oxygen uptake was evaluated. Twenty-nine subjects completed an 8-week controlled parallel-group training intervention. One group ("micro training" [MI]: n = 21) performed nine 15-minute training sessions weekly, whereas a second group ("classical training" [CL]: n = 8) completed exactly the same training on a weekly basis but as three 45-minute sessions. For each group, each session comprised exclusively strength, high-intensity cardiovascular training or muscle endurance training. Both groups increased shuttle run performance (MI: 1,373 ± 133 m vs. 1,498 ± 126 m, p = 0.05; CL: 1,074 ± 213 m vs. 1,451 ± 202 m, p
PubMed ID
26506198 View in PubMed
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Adductor canal block versus femoral nerve block for analgesia after total knee arthroplasty: a randomized, double-blind study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature106722
Source
Reg Anesth Pain Med. 2013 Nov-Dec;38(6):526-32
Publication Type
Article
Author
Pia Jæger
Dusanka Zaric
Jonna S Fomsgaard
Karen Lisa Hilsted
Jens Bjerregaard
Jens Gyrn
Ole Mathiesen
Tommy K Larsen
Jørgen B Dahl
Author Affiliation
From the *Department of Anaesthesia, Centre of Head and Orthopaedics, Copenhagen University Hospital, Rigshospitalet, Copenhagen; ‚ĆDepartment of Anaesthesia, Frederiksberg Hospital, Copenhagen University Hospital, Frederiksberg; ‚Ä°Department of Anaesthesia, Glostrup Hospital, Copenhagen University Hospital, Glostrup; §Section of Acute Pain Management, Department of Anaesthesia, Centre of Head and Orthopaedics, Copenhagen University Hospital, Rigshospitalet, Copenhagen; and ?Department of Surgery, Glostrup Hospital, Copenhagen University Hospital, Glostrup, Denmark.
Source
Reg Anesth Pain Med. 2013 Nov-Dec;38(6):526-32
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aged
Amides - administration & dosage
Analgesics, Opioid - therapeutic use
Anesthesia, Spinal
Anesthetics, Local - administration & dosage
Arthroplasty, Replacement, Knee - adverse effects
Denmark
Double-Blind Method
Female
Femoral Nerve
Humans
Infusions, Parenteral
Male
Middle Aged
Morphine - therapeutic use
Muscle strength
Muscle Weakness - etiology - physiopathology
Nerve Block - adverse effects - methods
Pain, Postoperative - diagnosis - etiology - prevention & control
Prospective Studies
Quadriceps Muscle - innervation
Recovery of Function
Time Factors
Treatment Outcome
Abstract
Femoral nerve block (FNB), a commonly used postoperative pain treatment after total knee arthroplasty (TKA), reduces quadriceps muscle strength essential for mobilization. In contrast, adductor canal block (ACB) is predominately a sensory nerve block. We hypothesized that ACB preserves quadriceps muscle strength as compared with FNB (primary end point) in patients after TKA. Secondary end points were effects on morphine consumption, pain, adductor muscle strength, morphine-related complications, and mobilization ability.
We performed a double-blind, randomized, controlled study of patients scheduled for TKA with spinal anesthesia. The patients were randomized to receive either a continuous ACB or an FNB via a catheter (30-mL 0.5% ropivacaine given initially, followed by a continuous infusion of 0.2% ropivacaine, 8 mL/h for 24 hours). Muscle strength was assessed with a handheld dynamometer, and we used the percentile change from baseline for comparisons. The trial was registered at clinicaltrials.gov (Identifier: NCT01470391).
We enrolled 54 patients, of which 48 were analyzed. Quadriceps strength as a percentage of baseline was significantly higher in the ACB group compared with the FNB group: (median [range]) 52% [31-71] versus 18% [4-48], (95% confidence interval, 8-41; P = 0.004). There was no difference between the groups regarding morphine consumption (P = 0.94), pain at rest (P = 0.21), pain during flexion of the knee (P = 0.16), or adductor muscle strength (P = 0.39); neither was there a difference in morphine-related adverse effects or mobilization ability (P > 0.05).
Adductor canal block preserved quadriceps muscle strength better than FNB, without a significant difference in postoperative pain.
Notes
Comment In: Reg Anesth Pain Med. 2014 May-Jun;39(3):253-424747312
Comment In: Reg Anesth Pain Med. 2014 May-Jun;39(3):263-424747322
Comment In: Reg Anesth Pain Med. 2014 May-Jun;39(3):254-524747313
Comment In: Reg Anesth Pain Med. 2014 May-Jun;39(3):26424747323
PubMed ID
24121608 View in PubMed
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Adiposity, aerobic fitness, muscle fitness, and markers of inflammation in children.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature119134
Source
Med Sci Sports Exerc. 2013 Apr;45(4):714-21
Publication Type
Article
Date
Apr-2013
Author
Jostein Steene-Johannessen
Elin Kolle
Lars Bo Andersen
Sigmund A Anderssen
Author Affiliation
Department of Sports, Faculty of Teacher Education and Sports, Sogn og Fjordane University College, Sogndal, Norway. jostsj@hisf.no
Source
Med Sci Sports Exerc. 2013 Apr;45(4):714-21
Date
Apr-2013
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adiposity - physiology
Biological Markers - blood
Child
Exercise Test
Female
Humans
Inflammation - blood - diagnosis
Inflammation Mediators - blood
Male
Muscle Strength - physiology
Norway
Physical Fitness - physiology
Regression Analysis
Sex Distribution
Abstract
The purpose of this study was to describe levels of inflammation markers in Norwegian children and to examine the associations of adiposity, aerobic fitness, and muscle fitness with markers of inflammation.
In 2005-2006, 1467 nine-year-olds were randomly selected from all regions in Norway. The participation rate was 89%. The inflammatory markers evaluated included C-reactive protein (CRP), leptin, adiponectin, plasminogen activator inhibitor-1, tumor necrosis factor-a, hepatocyte growth factor, resistin, and interleukin-6. We assessed muscular strength by measuring explosive, isometric, and endurance strength. Aerobic fitness was measured directly during a maximal cycle ergometer test. Adiposity was expressed as waist circumference (WC).
The girls had significantly higher levels of CRP, leptin, adiponectin, and resistin and lower levels of tumor necrosis factor-a compared with the boys. We observed a graded association of CRP and leptin levels across quintiles of WC, aerobic fitness, and muscle fitness (P = 0.001 for all participants). The regression analyses revealed that WC, aerobic fitness, and muscle fitness were independently associated with the CRP (WC ß = 0.158, P
PubMed ID
23135365 View in PubMed
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Aerobic fitness in late adolescence and the risk of early death: a prospective cohort study of 1.3 million Swedish men.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature288108
Source
Int J Epidemiol. 2016 08;45(4):1159-1168
Publication Type
Article
Date
08-2016
Author
Gabriel Högström
Anna Nordström
Peter Nordström
Source
Int J Epidemiol. 2016 08;45(4):1159-1168
Date
08-2016
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Body mass index
Cardiorespiratory fitness
Follow-Up Studies
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Mortality
Multivariate Analysis
Muscle strength
Obesity - epidemiology
Proportional Hazards Models
Prospective Studies
Registries
Risk factors
Sweden - epidemiology
Young Adult
Abstract
Fitness level and obesity have been associated with death in older populations. We investigated the relationship between aerobic fitness in late adolescence and early death, and whether a high fitness level can compensate the risk of being obese.
The cohort comprised 1 317 713 Swedish men (mean age, 18 years) that conscripted between 1969 and 1996. Aerobic fitness was assessed by an electrically braked cycle test. All-cause and specific causes of death were tracked using national registers. Multivariable adjusted associations were tested using Cox regression models.
During a mean follow-up period of 29 years, 44 301 subjects died. Individuals in the highest fifth of aerobic fitness were at lower risk of death from any cause [hazard ratio (HR), 0.49; 95% confidence interval (CI), 0.47-0.51] in comparison with individuals in the lowest fifth, with the strongest association seen for death related to alcohol and narcotics abuse (HR, 0.20; 95% CI, 0.15-0.26). Similar risks were found for weight-adjusted aerobic fitness. Aerobic fitness was associated with a reduced risk of death from any cause in normal-weight and overweight individuals, whereas the benefits were reduced in obese individuals (P
PubMed ID
26686843 View in PubMed
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Aerobic fitness is associated with low cardiovascular disease risk: the impact of lifestyle on early risk factors for atherosclerosis in young healthy Swedish individuals - the Lifestyle, Biomarker, and Atherosclerosis study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature284719
Source
Vasc Health Risk Manag. 2017;13:91-99
Publication Type
Article
Date
2017
Author
Maria Fernström
Ulrika Fernberg
Gabriella Eliason
Anita Hurtig-Wennlöf
Source
Vasc Health Risk Manag. 2017;13:91-99
Date
2017
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Age Factors
Biomarkers - blood
Cardiorespiratory fitness
Carotid Artery Diseases - blood - diagnostic imaging - epidemiology - prevention & control
Carotid Intima-Media Thickness
Cross-Sectional Studies
Dyslipidemias - blood - epidemiology - prevention & control
Exercise Test
Feeding Behavior
Hand Strength
Healthy Diet
Healthy Volunteers
Humans
Insulin Resistance
Muscle strength
Prevalence
Prognosis
Protective factors
Risk assessment
Risk factors
Risk Reduction Behavior
Surveys and Questionnaires
Sweden - epidemiology
Time Factors
Young Adult
Abstract
The progression of cardiovascular disease (CVD) and atherosclerosis is slow and develops over decades. In the cross-sectional Swedish Lifestyle, Biomarker, and Atherosclerosis study, 834 young, self-reported healthy adults aged 18.0-25.9 years have been studied to identify early risk factors for atherosclerosis.
The aims of this study were to 1) assess selected cardiometabolic biomarkers, carotid intima-media thickness (cIMT) as a marker of subclinical atherosclerosis, and lifestyle-related indicators (food habits, handgrip strength, and oxygen uptake, VO2 max); 2) analyze the associations between cIMT and lifestyle factors; and 3) identify subjects at risk of CVD using a risk score and to compare the characteristics of subjects with and without risk of CVD.
Blood samples were taken in a fasting state, and food habits were reported through a questionnaire. cIMT was measured by ultrasound, and VO2 max was measured by ergometer bike test. The risk score was calculated according to Wildman.
cIMT (mean ± standard deviation) was 0.50±0.06 mm, and VO2 max values were 37.8±8.5 and 42.9±9.9 mL/kg/min, in women and men, respectively. No correlation was found between aerobic fitness expressed as VO2 max (mL/kg/min) and cIMT. Using Wildman's definition, 12% of the subjects were classified as being at risk of CVD, and 15% had homeostasis model assessment of insulin resistance. A total of 35% of women and 25% of men had lower high-density lipoprotein cholesterol than recommended. Food habits did not differ between those at risk and those not at risk. However, aerobic fitness measured as VO2 max (mL/kg/min) differed; 47% of the subjects at risk had low aerobic fitness compared to 23% of the nonrisk subjects (P
Notes
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PubMed ID
28352184 View in PubMed
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[Age dynamics of functional parameters in men in the Polar region].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature117718
Source
Adv Gerontol. 2013;26(4):647-51
Publication Type
Article
Date
2013
Author
Iu G Solonin
E R Boiko
A L Markov
Source
Adv Gerontol. 2013;26(4):647-51
Date
2013
Language
Russian
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adrenocorticotropic Hormone - analysis
Adult
Age Factors
Aged
Aging - physiology
Body mass index
Cold Climate - adverse effects
Health Status Indicators
Health Surveys
Heart Function Tests - methods
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Muscle strength
Population Dynamics
Postural Balance
Psychomotor Performance
Russia - epidemiology
Testosterone - analysis
Work Capacity Evaluation
Abstract
In order to test the hypothesis about rapid involution of functional parameters in residents in the Polar region, the functional parameters in men of 20-69 years have been compared in cross-sectional study. There is a tendency to a steady decrease of height, strength indices, parameter of muscle working capacity, balancing of the body when standing on one leg, vital capacity, cardiac output, tolerance to hypoxemia, level of physical health, adrenocorticotropic hormone and testosterone levels and an increase of body mass index, index of coordination (impairment of motor coordination), time of visual-motor response, systolic and diastolic blood pressure, index of functional changes, insulin level. More pronounced decline of functions is observed in men after 50 years.
PubMed ID
24738254 View in PubMed
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Ageing and physical activity: evidence to develop exercise recommendations for older adults.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature159207
Source
Can J Public Health. 2007;98 Suppl 2:S69-108
Publication Type
Article
Date
2007
Author
Donald H Paterson
Gareth R Jones
Charles L Rice
Author Affiliation
Canadian Centre for Activity and Aging, University of Western Ontario, 1490 Richmond Street N., London, Ontario, Canada. dpaterso@uwo.ca
Source
Can J Public Health. 2007;98 Suppl 2:S69-108
Date
2007
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Age Factors
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Aging
Canada
Evidence-Based Medicine
Exercise - physiology
Female
Geriatric Assessment
Guidelines as Topic
Health Planning Guidelines
Humans
Internationality
Male
Middle Aged
Motor Activity
Muscle Contraction
Muscle strength
Muscle, Skeletal
Physical Fitness
Program Development
Abstract
An abundance of epidemiological research confirms the benefits of physical activity in reducing risk of various age-related morbidities and all-cause mortality. Analysis of the literature focusing on key exercise variables (e.g., intensity, type, and volume) suggests that the requisite beneficial amount of activity is that which engenders improved cardiorespiratory fitness, strength, power, and, indirectly, balance. Age-related declines in these components are such that physical limitations impinge on functional activities of daily living. However, an exercise programme can minimize declines, thus preventing older adults (age 65+ years) from crossing functional thresholds of inability. Cross-sectional and longitudinal data demonstrate that cardiorespiratory fitness is associated with functional capacity and independence; strength and, importantly, power are related to performance and activities of daily living; and balance-mobility in combination with power are important factors in preventing falls. Exercise interventions have documented that older adults can adapt physiologically to exercise training, with gains in functional capacities. The few studies that have explored minimal or optimal activity requirements suggest that a threshold (intensity) within the moderately vigorous domain is needed to achieve and preserve related health benefits. Thus, physical activity and (or) exercise prescriptions should emphasize activities of the specificity and type to improve components related to the maintenance of functional capacity and independence; these will also delay morbidity and mortality. An appropriate recommendation for older adults includes moderately vigorous cardiorespiratory activities (e.g., brisk walking), strength and (or) power training for maintenance of muscle mass and specific muscle-group performance, as well as "balance-mobility practice" and flexibility (stretching) exercise as needed.
PubMed ID
18213941 View in PubMed
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Alterations in molecular muscle mass regulators after 8 days immobilizing Special Forces mission.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature268604
Source
Scand J Med Sci Sports. 2015 Apr;25(2):175-83
Publication Type
Article
Date
Apr-2015
Author
J G Jespersen
U R Mikkelsen
A. Nedergaard
J B Thorlund
P. Schjerling
C. Suetta
P A Christensen
P. Aagaard
Source
Scand J Med Sci Sports. 2015 Apr;25(2):175-83
Date
Apr-2015
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Blotting, Western
Denmark
Humans
Immobilization - physiology
Male
Military Personnel
Muscle Proteins - metabolism
Muscle Strength - physiology
Muscular Atrophy - metabolism
Occupational Diseases - metabolism
Prone Position - physiology
Quadriceps Muscle - metabolism
Reverse Transcriptase Polymerase Chain Reaction
Abstract
In military operations, declined physical capacity can endanger the life of soldiers. During special support and reconnaissance (SSR) missions, Special Forces soldiers sustain 1-2 weeks full-body horizontal immobilization, which impairs muscle strength and performance. Adequate muscle mass and strength are necessary in combat or evacuation situations, which prompt for improved understanding of muscle mass modulation during SSR missions. To explore the molecular regulation of myofiber size during a simulated SSR operation, nine male Special Forces soldiers were biopsied in m. vastus lateralis pre and post 8 days immobilizing restricted prone position. After immobilization, total mammalian target of rapamycin protein was reduced by 42% (P?
PubMed ID
24422600 View in PubMed
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An enhanced-recovery protocol improves outcome after colorectal resection already during the first year: a single-center experience in 168 consecutive patients.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature88788
Source
Dis Colon Rectum. 2009 May;52(5):978-85
Publication Type
Article
Date
May-2009
Author
Nygren Jonas
Soop Mattias
Thorell Anders
Hausel Jonatan
Ljungqvist Olle
Author Affiliation
Center of Gastrointestinal Disease, Ersta Hospital and Karolinska Institutet, Institution of Clinical Sciences at Danderyds Hospital, Stockholm, Sweden. jonas.nygren@erstadiakoni.se
Source
Dis Colon Rectum. 2009 May;52(5):978-85
Date
May-2009
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aged
Body Composition
Clinical Protocols
Colonic Diseases - rehabilitation - surgery
Defecation
Energy intake
Female
Forced expiratory volume
Humans
Length of Stay - statistics & numerical data
Male
Muscle strength
Outcome and Process Assessment (Health Care)
Patient Readmission - statistics & numerical data
Perioperative Care - methods
Postoperative Complications
Prospective Studies
Recovery of Function
Rectal Diseases - rehabilitation - surgery
Sweden
Walking
Abstract
PURPOSE: This study was designed to investigate the clinical outcome and recovery before and immediately after implementation of the enhanced recovery after surgery enhanced recovery after surgery protocol in colonic and rectal resection. METHODS: One hundred and sixty-eight consecutive patients in a single center underwent colorectal surgery before (traditional, n = 69) and immediately after implementing enhanced recovery after surgery (n = 99). Rectal surgery was performed in 77 patients. Postoperative food and fluid intake, mobilization, physiologic function, and clinical outcome were measured prospectively. RESULTS: Resumption of oral diet was achieved on postoperative day postoperative day 1 in the enhanced recovery after surgery group. In the enhanced recovery after surgery group, mobilization more than 6 hours daily was achieved on postoperative day 2 to 3 and passage of stool occurred on postoperative day 2 vs. postoperative day 5 in the traditional group (P
PubMed ID
19502866 View in PubMed
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283 records – page 1 of 29.