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31 records – page 1 of 4.

Ambient temperature and neck EMG with +Gz loading on a trampoline.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature162975
Source
Aviat Space Environ Med. 2007 Jun;78(6):574-8
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-2007
Author
Roope Sovelius
Juha Oksa
Harri Rintala
Heini Huhtala
Simo Siitonen
Author Affiliation
Training Air Wing, P.O. Box 5, FIN-62201 Kauhava, Finland. roope.sovelius@mil.fi
Source
Aviat Space Environ Med. 2007 Jun;78(6):574-8
Date
Jun-2007
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Aerospace Medicine
Cold Temperature - adverse effects
Electromyography
Female
Finland
Humans
Hypergravity
Male
Military Personnel
Muscle Tonus - physiology
Neck Muscles - injuries - physiopathology
Seasons
Skin Temperature - physiology
Abstract
Fighter pilots who are frequently exposed to severe cold ambient temperatures experience neck pain disabilities and occupational disorders more often than those who are not so exposed. We hypothesized that a cold-induced increase in muscle strain might lead to in-flight neck injuries. The aims of this study were to measure the level of cooling before takeoff and to determine muscle strain under Gz loading (0 to +4 Gz) at different temperatures.
Test subjects' (n = 14) skin temperature (T(skin)) over the trapezoids was measured before the walk to the aircraft and again in the cockpit (air temperature -14 degrees C). The subjects then performed trampoline exercises in two different ambient temperatures (-2 degrees C and +21 degrees C) after a 30-min period at the respective temperatures. EMG activity of the sternocleidomastoid (SCM), cervical erector spinae (CES), trapezoid (TRA), thoracic erector spinae (TES) muscles, and Tskin of the SCM and TRA were measured.
Tskin over the trapezoids decreased from 30.1 +/- 1.7 degrees C to 27.8 +/- 2.6 degrees C (p
PubMed ID
17571657 View in PubMed
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Back pain and isometric back muscle strength of workers in a Danish factory.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature252852
Source
Scand J Rehabil Med. 1975;7(3):125-8
Publication Type
Article
Date
1975
Author
O. Find Pedersen
R. Petersen
E. Schack Staffeldt
Source
Scand J Rehabil Med. 1975;7(3):125-8
Date
1975
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Age Factors
Back - physiology
Back Pain - epidemiology
Body Height
Body Weight
Denmark
Female
Humans
Male
Muscle Tonus
Obesity
Occupational Diseases - epidemiology
Sex Factors
Work Capacity Evaluation
Abstract
105 factory workers (38 females and 67 males) have been questioned about their frequency of back pain. 60% of the females and 61% of the males have previously experienced episodes of back pain. 21% of the females and 37% of the males have been absent from work due to back pain. The incidence of back pain is not related to age, height, sort of work, or isometric muscle strength of the back (IS). For the males the incidence rises with increasing weight, i.e. combination of height and obesity, but is not related to any two single factors. For the females there is no correlation between the incidence of pain and weight. IS is correlated to height and age in the males but not in the females. Standards for IS are presented and suggested as a guide to evaluation of the working capabilities of individual subjects with back pain.
PubMed ID
126491 View in PubMed
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Behavior of single motor units during pre-shivering tone and shivering tremor.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature301844
Source
American Journal of Physical Medicine. 51(2):16-22
Publication Type
Article
Date
February 1972
Author
Petajan, Jack H.
Williams, Darrell D.
Author Affiliation
Arctic Health Research Center
Source
American Journal of Physical Medicine. 51(2):16-22
Date
February 1972
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Action Potentials
Humans
Motor Neurons
Physiology
Muscle Contraction
Muscle Tonus
Shivering
Tremor
PubMed ID
5025266 View in PubMed
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Comparison of muscle strength and bone mineral density in healthy postmenopausal women. A cross-sectional population study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature227183
Source
Scand J Rehabil Med. 1991;23(3):153-7
Publication Type
Article
Date
1991
Author
E S Kyllönen
H K Väänänen
J E Heikkinen
E. Kurttila-Matero
V. Martikkala
J H Vanharanta
Author Affiliation
Department of Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation, University Central Hospital of Oulu, Finland.
Source
Scand J Rehabil Med. 1991;23(3):153-7
Date
1991
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Absorptiometry, Photon
Age Factors
Back
Body Weight
Bone Density
Cross-Sectional Studies
Female
Femur Neck - chemistry - radiography
Finland
Humans
Lumbar Vertebrae - chemistry - radiography
Menopause
Middle Aged
Muscle Tonus
Predictive value of tests
Abstract
In this cross-sectional population study with 78 healthy 0.5-5 years postmenopausal, 49-55 year old females a significant simple linear correlation between lumbar spine LII-LIV bone mineral density and adjacent back extensor and flexor isometric muscle strength was found. With the stepwise multiple linear regression analyses the most significant predictors for lumbar spine LII-LIV and femoral neck bone mineral density were weight (partial R2) (R2 = 0.197, p = 0.0001; R2 = 0.157, p = 0.0009) and age (R2 = 0.056, p = 0.0205; R2 = 0.036, p = 0.0708). Height and isometric muscle strength and endurance of muscles were not significant predictors. Weight and age were the most significant predictors also for isometric muscle strength. The mobility of spine, body fat content and anaerobic threshold had no correlation on bone mineral density.
PubMed ID
1962158 View in PubMed
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Developmental differences in childhood motor coordination predict adult alcohol dependence: proposed role for the cerebellum in alcoholism.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature9266
Source
Alcohol Clin Exp Res. 2005 Mar;29(3):353-7
Publication Type
Article
Date
Mar-2005
Author
Ann M Manzardo
Elizabeth C Penick
Joachim Knop
Elizabeth J Nickel
Sandra Hall
Per Jensen
William F Gabrielli
Author Affiliation
Department of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences, University of Kansas Medical Center, 1040C Sudler, MS 4015, 3901 Rainbow Boulevard, Kansas City, KS 66160, USA. amanzardo@kumc.edu
Source
Alcohol Clin Exp Res. 2005 Mar;29(3):353-7
Date
Mar-2005
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Alcoholism - diagnosis - physiopathology
Cerebellum - physiopathology
Child Development
Databases, Factual
Denmark
Female
Humans
Infant
Infant, Newborn
Longitudinal Studies
Male
Muscle Development - physiology
Muscle Tonus - physiology
Predictive value of tests
Prenatal Diagnosis
Psychiatric Status Rating Scales
Psychomotor Performance - physiology
Research Support, N.I.H., Extramural
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Research Support, U.S. Gov't, P.H.S.
Walking - physiology
Abstract
BACKGROUND: The Danish Longitudinal Study of Alcoholism has identified a number of early biological indicators that predicted alcohol dependence 30 years later. In light of recent evidence linking deficits of the cerebellum to certain neuropsychiatric disorders often comorbid with alcoholism, we hypothesized that developmental deficits in the cerebellar vermis may also play a role in the initiation of adult alcohol dependence. The present study evaluated whether measures of motor development in the first year of life predict alcohol dependence three decades later. METHODS: A total of 241 subjects of the original 330 infants who were entered into this study completed the 30-year follow-up (12 had died). The subjects were men who were drawn from a large birth cohort born in Copenhagen, Denmark, from 1959 to 1961. A comprehensive series of measures were obtained on each subject before, during, and shortly after birth as well as at 1 year of age. Muscle tone at birth and day 5 as well as 1-year measures of motor coordination--age to sitting, standing, and walking--were examined. A DSM-III-R diagnosis of alcohol dependence and a measure of lifetime problem drinking served as the 30-year outcome variables. RESULTS: Several measures of childhood motor development significantly predicted alcohol dependence at 30 years of age. These included deficits in muscle tone 5 days after birth, delays in the age to sitting, and delays in the age to walking. CONCLUSIONS: Relationships found between adult alcoholism and early delays in motor development offer support for the theory that cerebellar deficits may play a causal role in the addiction process.
PubMed ID
15770110 View in PubMed
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The effect of bupivacaine paracervical block on the neurobehavioural responses of newborn infants.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature60015
Source
Acta Anaesthesiol Scand. 1988 Oct;32(7):566-70
Publication Type
Article
Date
Oct-1988
Author
T. Kangas-Saarela
R. Jouppila
J. Puolakka
P. Jouppila
A. Hollmén
M. Puukka
Author Affiliation
Department of Anaesthesiology, University of Oulu, Finland.
Source
Acta Anaesthesiol Scand. 1988 Oct;32(7):566-70
Date
Oct-1988
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Anesthesia, Obstetrical
Autonomic Nerve Block
Bupivacaine
Female
Habituation (Psychophysiology) - physiology
Humans
Infant, Newborn - physiology - psychology
Muscle Tonus
Orientation - physiology
Pregnancy
Reflex - physiology
Abstract
The effects of maternal bupivacaine paracervical block on neonatal neurobehavioural responses were studied at the ages of 3 h, 1 day, 2 days and 4-5 days. Subjects were healthy, term neonates born vaginally to 10 mothers with paracervical block and to 12 mothers without analgesia. No statistically significant differences were found in the responses between the groups. It is concluded that paracervical block with a small dose of bupivacaine, applied by experienced obstetricians to non-risk parturients with healthy foetuses, has no detrimental effects on newborn behaviour or neurological recovery.
PubMed ID
3188827 View in PubMed
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Effects of an eight-day space flight on microvibration and physiological tremor.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature208040
Source
Am J Physiol. 1997 Jul;273(1 Pt 2):R86-92
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jul-1997
Author
E. Gallasch
M. Moser
I B Kozlovskaya
T. Kenner
A. Noordergraaf
Author Affiliation
Physiologisches Institut, Universität Graz, Austria.
Source
Am J Physiol. 1997 Jul;273(1 Pt 2):R86-92
Date
Jul-1997
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Cardiovascular Physiological Phenomena
Electrocardiography
Hand
Humans
Isometric Contraction
Male
Motor Activity - physiology
Movement - physiology
Muscle Tonus
Muscle, Skeletal - physiology - physiopathology
Posture
Russia
Space Flight
Time Factors
Tremor - physiopathology
Vibration
Weightlessness
Abstract
Microgravity was used to study accelerometrically recorded microvibration (MV) and postural tremor (PT) at reduced muscle tone on one cosmonaut before, during, and after an 8-day space flight on the Russian Mir station. MV of the relaxed forearm in the 1 g environment showed the typical 7- to 13-Hz resonance oscillations triggered by the heart beat. In 0 g, these pulsations shifted to below 5 Hz and the waveform became similar to an ultralow frequency acceleration ballistocardiogram. PT of the arm stretched forward showed an irregular waveform in 1 g. In 0 g, the higher-frequency components were reduced and again an ultralow frequency ballistocardiogram emerged. As a control, hand force tremor was recorded as well; it was not affected by the gravity condition. A second-order analog with muscle stiffness (C) as parameter was used to evaluate the measurements. For MV it could be shown that cardiac impacts produce damped resonance oscillations when C is high enough (1 g). At low C (0 g), this resonance phenomenon is essentially filtered out. For PT both neuromuscular and cardiovascular forces produce an irregular output; when C is lowered (0 g) the higher-frequency content is strongly reduced. It is concluded that both MV and PT waveforms are sensitive to musculoskeletal stiffness, such that at the lowest stiffness achieved the cardiac impact dominates. In 1 g, the cosmonaut's data were not significantly different from the results in a control group (n = 6).
PubMed ID
9249536 View in PubMed
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[Histological structure of the scar of the uterus after cesarean section]

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature66760
Source
Pediatr Akus Ginekol. 1969;31(6):45-7
Publication Type
Article
Date
1969
Author
Z S Klimenko
G I Gitman
Source
Pediatr Akus Ginekol. 1969;31(6):45-7
Date
1969
Language
Ukrainian
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Cesarean Section
Cicatrix
Female
Humans
Muscle Tonus
Pregnancy
Regeneration
Uterus - cytology
PubMed ID
5407338 View in PubMed
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31 records – page 1 of 4.