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Adaptations to Short, Frequent Sessions of Endurance and Strength Training Are Similar to Longer, Less Frequent Exercise Sessions When the Total Volume Is the Same.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature274072
Source
J Strength Cond Res. 2015 Nov;29 Suppl 11:S46-51
Publication Type
Article
Date
Nov-2015
Author
Anders Kilen
Line B Hjelvang
Niels Dall
Nanna L Kruse
Nikolai B Nordsborg
Source
J Strength Cond Res. 2015 Nov;29 Suppl 11:S46-51
Date
Nov-2015
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adaptation, physiological - physiology
Adult
Denmark
Exercise - physiology
Female
Humans
Male
Military Personnel
Muscle Strength - physiology
Muscle, Skeletal - physiology
Oxygen Consumption - physiology
Physical Conditioning, Human - methods
Resistance Training - methods
Abstract
The hypothesis that the distribution of weekly training across several short sessions, as opposed to fewer longer sessions, enhances maximal strength gain without compromising maximal oxygen uptake was evaluated. Twenty-nine subjects completed an 8-week controlled parallel-group training intervention. One group ("micro training" [MI]: n = 21) performed nine 15-minute training sessions weekly, whereas a second group ("classical training" [CL]: n = 8) completed exactly the same training on a weekly basis but as three 45-minute sessions. For each group, each session comprised exclusively strength, high-intensity cardiovascular training or muscle endurance training. Both groups increased shuttle run performance (MI: 1,373 ± 133 m vs. 1,498 ± 126 m, p = 0.05; CL: 1,074 ± 213 m vs. 1,451 ± 202 m, p
PubMed ID
26506198 View in PubMed
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Adiposity, aerobic fitness, muscle fitness, and markers of inflammation in children.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature119134
Source
Med Sci Sports Exerc. 2013 Apr;45(4):714-21
Publication Type
Article
Date
Apr-2013
Author
Jostein Steene-Johannessen
Elin Kolle
Lars Bo Andersen
Sigmund A Anderssen
Author Affiliation
Department of Sports, Faculty of Teacher Education and Sports, Sogn og Fjordane University College, Sogndal, Norway. jostsj@hisf.no
Source
Med Sci Sports Exerc. 2013 Apr;45(4):714-21
Date
Apr-2013
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adiposity - physiology
Biological Markers - blood
Child
Exercise Test
Female
Humans
Inflammation - blood - diagnosis
Inflammation Mediators - blood
Male
Muscle Strength - physiology
Norway
Physical Fitness - physiology
Regression Analysis
Sex Distribution
Abstract
The purpose of this study was to describe levels of inflammation markers in Norwegian children and to examine the associations of adiposity, aerobic fitness, and muscle fitness with markers of inflammation.
In 2005-2006, 1467 nine-year-olds were randomly selected from all regions in Norway. The participation rate was 89%. The inflammatory markers evaluated included C-reactive protein (CRP), leptin, adiponectin, plasminogen activator inhibitor-1, tumor necrosis factor-a, hepatocyte growth factor, resistin, and interleukin-6. We assessed muscular strength by measuring explosive, isometric, and endurance strength. Aerobic fitness was measured directly during a maximal cycle ergometer test. Adiposity was expressed as waist circumference (WC).
The girls had significantly higher levels of CRP, leptin, adiponectin, and resistin and lower levels of tumor necrosis factor-a compared with the boys. We observed a graded association of CRP and leptin levels across quintiles of WC, aerobic fitness, and muscle fitness (P = 0.001 for all participants). The regression analyses revealed that WC, aerobic fitness, and muscle fitness were independently associated with the CRP (WC ß = 0.158, P
PubMed ID
23135365 View in PubMed
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Alterations in molecular muscle mass regulators after 8 days immobilizing Special Forces mission.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature268604
Source
Scand J Med Sci Sports. 2015 Apr;25(2):175-83
Publication Type
Article
Date
Apr-2015
Author
J G Jespersen
U R Mikkelsen
A. Nedergaard
J B Thorlund
P. Schjerling
C. Suetta
P A Christensen
P. Aagaard
Source
Scand J Med Sci Sports. 2015 Apr;25(2):175-83
Date
Apr-2015
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Blotting, Western
Denmark
Humans
Immobilization - physiology
Male
Military Personnel
Muscle Proteins - metabolism
Muscle Strength - physiology
Muscular Atrophy - metabolism
Occupational Diseases - metabolism
Prone Position - physiology
Quadriceps Muscle - metabolism
Reverse Transcriptase Polymerase Chain Reaction
Abstract
In military operations, declined physical capacity can endanger the life of soldiers. During special support and reconnaissance (SSR) missions, Special Forces soldiers sustain 1-2 weeks full-body horizontal immobilization, which impairs muscle strength and performance. Adequate muscle mass and strength are necessary in combat or evacuation situations, which prompt for improved understanding of muscle mass modulation during SSR missions. To explore the molecular regulation of myofiber size during a simulated SSR operation, nine male Special Forces soldiers were biopsied in m. vastus lateralis pre and post 8 days immobilizing restricted prone position. After immobilization, total mammalian target of rapamycin protein was reduced by 42% (P?
PubMed ID
24422600 View in PubMed
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Anoctamin 5 muscular dystrophy in Denmark: prevalence, genotypes, phenotypes, cardiac findings, and muscle protein expression.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature113931
Source
J Neurol. 2013 Aug;260(8):2084-93
Publication Type
Article
Date
Aug-2013
Author
Nanna Witting
Morten Duno
Helle Petri
Thomas Krag
Henning Bundgaard
Lars Kober
John Vissing
Author Affiliation
Neuromuscular Research Unit and Department of Neurology, Rigshospitalet, University of Copenhagen, Copenhagen, Denmark. nanna.witting@regionh.dk
Source
J Neurol. 2013 Aug;260(8):2084-93
Date
Aug-2013
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Age of Onset
Aged
Biopsy
Blotting, Western
Cardiomyopathies - epidemiology - genetics - pathology
Chloride Channels - genetics - physiology
Cohort Studies
Creatine Kinase - metabolism
DNA - genetics
Denmark - epidemiology
Electrocardiography
Female
Genotype
Humans
Magnetic Resonance Imaging
Male
Middle Aged
Muscle Proteins - biosynthesis
Muscle Strength - physiology
Muscular Dystrophies - epidemiology - genetics - pathology
Mutation - genetics
Phenotype
Prevalence
Respiratory Function Tests
Young Adult
Abstract
Since the initial description in 2010 of anoctamin 5 deficiency as a cause of muscular dystrophy, a handful of papers have described this disease in cases of mixed populations. We report the first large regional study and present data on new aspects of prevalence, muscular and cardiac phenotypic characteristics, and muscle protein expression. All patients in our neuromuscular unit with genetically unclassified, recessive limb girdle muscular dystrophy (LGMD2), Miyoshi-type distal myopathy (MMD) or persistent asymptomatic hyperCK-emia (PACK) were assessed for mutations in the ANO5 gene. Genetically confirmed patients were evaluated with muscular and cardiopulmonary examination. Among 40 unclassified patients (28 LGMD2, 5 MMD, 7 PACK), 20 were homozygous or compound heterozygous for ANO5 mutations, (13 LGMD2, 5 MMD, 2 PACK). Prevalence of ANO5 deficiency in Denmark was estimated at 1:100.000 and ANO5 mutations caused 11 % of our total cohort of LGMD2 cases making it the second most common LGMD2 etiology in Denmark. Eight patients complained of dysphagia and 3 dated symptoms of onset in childhood. Cardiac examinations revealed increased frequency of premature ventricular contractions. Four novel putative pathogenic mutations were discovered. Total prevalence and distribution of phenotypes of ANO5 disease in a representative regional cohort are described for the first time. A high prevalence of ANO5 deficiency was found among patients with unclassified LGMD2 (46 %) and MMD (100 %). The high incidence of reported dysphagia is a new phenotypic feature not previously reported, and cardiac investigations revealed that ANO5-patients may have an increased risk of ventricular arrhythmia.
PubMed ID
23670307 View in PubMed
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Association between changes in global femoral offset after total hip arthroplasty and function, quality of life, and abductor muscle strength. A prospective cohort study of 222 patients.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature272483
Source
Acta Orthop. 2016 Feb;87(1):36-41
Publication Type
Article
Date
Feb-2016
Author
Sarwar S Mahmood
Sebastian S Mukka
Sead Crnalic
Per Wretenberg
Arkan S Sayed-Noor
Source
Acta Orthop. 2016 Feb;87(1):36-41
Date
Feb-2016
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Arthroplasty, Replacement, Hip - adverse effects - methods - psychology
Cohort Studies
Female
Femur - physiopathology - radiography
Femur Head - physiopathology - radiography
Follow-Up Studies
Hip Joint - physiopathology - radiography
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Muscle Strength - physiology
Osteoarthritis, Hip - pathology - radiography - surgery
Postoperative Complications - physiopathology - radiography
Prospective Studies
Quality of Life
Range of Motion, Articular - physiology
Recovery of Function
Risk assessment
Sweden
Treatment Outcome
Abstract
There is no consensus on the association between global femoral offset (FO) and outcome after total hip arthroplasty (THA). We assessed the association between FO and patients' reported hip function, quality of life, and abductor muscle strength.
We included 250 patients with unilateral hip osteoarthritis who underwent a THA. Before the operation, the patient's reported hip function was evaluated with the Western Ontario and McMaster Universities Osteoarthritis (WOMAC) index and quality of life was evaluated with EQ-5D. At 1-year follow-up, the same scores and also hip abductor muscle strength were measured. 222 patients were available for follow-up. These patients were divided into 3 groups according to the postoperative global FO of the operated hip compared to the contralateral hip, as measured on plain radiographs: the decreased FO group (more than 5 mm reduction), the restored FO group (within 5 mm restoration), and the increased FO group (more than 5 mm increment).
All 3 groups improved (p?
PubMed ID
26471772 View in PubMed
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Association between changes in habitual physical activity and changes in bone density, muscle strength, and functional performance in elderly men and women.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature91213
Source
J Am Geriatr Soc. 2008 Dec;56(12):2252-60
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-2008
Author
Daly Robin M
Ahlborg Henrik G
Ringsberg Karin
Gardsell Per
Sernbo Ingemar
Karlsson Magnus K
Author Affiliation
Department of Medicine, University of Melbourne, Western Hospital, Footscray, Melbourne, Australia. rdaly@unimelb.edu.au
Source
J Am Geriatr Soc. 2008 Dec;56(12):2252-60
Date
Dec-2008
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Bone Density - physiology
Female
Follow-Up Studies
Fractures, Bone - epidemiology
Gait
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Motor Activity - physiology
Muscle Strength - physiology
Postural Balance
Prospective Studies
Abstract
OBJECTIVES: To investigate the long-term effects of habitual physical activity on changes in musculoskeletal health, functional performance, and fracture risk in elderly men and women. DESIGN: Ten-year prospective population-based study. SETTING: Malmö-Sjöbo Prospective Study, Sweden. PARTICIPANTS: Participants were 152 men and 206 women aged 50, 60, 70, and 80 who were followed for 10 years. MEASUREMENTS: Distal radius bone mineral density (BMD) (single photon absorptiometry), upper limb muscle (grip) strength, balance, gait velocity, occupational and leisure-time activity, and fractures (interview-administered questionnaire) were reassessed after 10 years. Annual changes for all measures were compared between participants with varying habitual physical activity histories at baseline and follow-up: inactive-inactive (n=202), active-inactive (n=47), inactive-active (n=49), and active-active (n=60). Data for men and women were pooled, because there were no sex-by-activity group interactions. To detect possible differences in fracture incidence between the varying habitual activity groups, participants were classified into two activity groups based on their activity classification at baseline and follow-up: inactive:less active versus active:more active. RESULTS: The annual rate of bone loss was 0.6% per year less in individuals classified as active at both time points than in those classified as inactive at both time points (P
PubMed ID
19016934 View in PubMed
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Association between obesity history and hand grip strength in older adults--exploring the roles of inflammation and insulin resistance as mediating factors.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature137143
Source
J Gerontol A Biol Sci Med Sci. 2011 Mar;66(3):341-8
Publication Type
Article
Date
Mar-2011
Author
Sari Stenholm
Janne Sallinen
Annemarie Koster
Taina Rantanen
Päivi Sainio
Markku Heliövaara
Seppo Koskinen
Author Affiliation
Department of Health, Functional Capacity and Welfare, National Institute for Health and Welfare, Peltolantie 3, FI-20720 Turku, Finland. sari.stenholm@thl.fi
Source
J Gerontol A Biol Sci Med Sci. 2011 Mar;66(3):341-8
Date
Mar-2011
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aged
Body Height
Body mass index
C-Reactive Protein
Female
Finland
Hand Strength
Humans
Inflammation - complications
Insulin Resistance
Male
Middle Aged
Muscle Strength - physiology
Obesity - complications
Risk factors
Abstract
To examine the association between obesity history and hand grip strength, and whether the association is partly explained by subclinical inflammation and insulin resistance.
Data are from 2,021 men and women aged 55 years and older participating in the representative population-based Health 2000 Survey in Finland. Body mass and body height, maximal hand grip strength, C-reactive protein, and insulin resistance based on homeostasis model assessment (HOMA-IR) were measured in a health examination. Recalled weight at 20, 30, 40, and 50 years of age were recorded to obtain a hierarchical classification of obesity history. Obesity was defined as body mass index = 30 kg/m².
Earlier onset of obesity was associated with lower hand grip strength (p
Notes
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PubMed ID
21310808 View in PubMed
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Associations between biopsychosocial factors and chronic upper limb pain among slaughterhouse workers: cross sectional study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature277294
Source
BMC Musculoskelet Disord. 2016 Feb 27;17:104
Publication Type
Article
Date
Feb-27-2016
Author
Emil Sundstrup
Markus D Jakobsen
Mikkel Brandt
Kenneth Jay
Per Aagaard
Lars L Andersen
Source
BMC Musculoskelet Disord. 2016 Feb 27;17:104
Date
Feb-27-2016
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Abattoirs
Adult
Chronic Pain - diagnosis - etiology - psychology
Cross-Sectional Studies
Denmark - epidemiology
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Muscle Strength - physiology
Occupational Exposure - adverse effects
Pain Measurement - methods - psychology
Psychology
Upper Extremity - pathology
Abstract
Knowledge of factors associated with chronic pain is necessary for preventive strategies. The present study investigates biopsychosocial differences, with specific focus on rate of force development (RFD) and work ability, between workers with and without chronic upper limb pain.
Eighty-two male slaughterhouse workers, 49 with chronic upper limb pain and 33 pain-free controls participated in the study. Maximal muscle strength, RFD, and muscle activity was determined from fast and forceful maximal voluntary contractions for the shoulder and hand. Participants filled out a questionnaire on work ability (work ability index), work disability (Work module of DASH questionnaire), fear avoidance, and self-rated health. Additionally, pressure pain threshold (PPT) was measured in muscles of the arm, shoulder and lower leg.
Muscle strength and RFD (determined within time intervals of 30, 50, 100, and 200 ms relative to onset of contraction) was 28 % and 58-78 % lower, respectively, in workers with chronic pain compared with pain-free controls, and paralleled by reduced muscle activity (all p 0.4).
Chronic upper limb pain was paralleled by reduced neuromuscular function of the shoulder and hand along with impaired work ability, work disability and general health. Future studies on chronic pain management at the workplace should carefully consider the biopsychosocial nature of pain when designing and implementing preventive strategies.
Notes
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PubMed ID
26919829 View in PubMed
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Associations of Leukocyte Telomere Length With Aerobic and Muscular Fitness in Young Adults.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature282036
Source
Am J Epidemiol. 2017 Apr 01;185(7):529-537
Publication Type
Article
Date
Apr-01-2017
Author
Dylan M Williams
Jessica L Buxton
Marko T Kantomaa
Tuija H Tammelin
Alexandra I F Blakemore
Marjo-Riitta Järvelin
Source
Am J Epidemiol. 2017 Apr 01;185(7):529-537
Date
Apr-01-2017
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Age Factors
Body mass index
Cross-Sectional Studies
Female
Finland
Hand Strength - physiology
Humans
Leukocytes - physiology
Male
Muscle Strength - physiology
Physical Endurance - physiology
Physical Fitness - physiology
Sex Factors
Telomere Homeostasis - physiology
Abstract
Decline in both telomere length and physical fitness over the life course may contribute to increased risk of several chronic diseases. The relationship between telomere length and aerobic and muscular fitness is not well characterized. We examined whether there are cross-sectional associations of mean relative leukocyte telomere length (LTL) with objective measures of aerobic fitness, muscle strength, and muscle endurance, using data on 31-year-old participants of the Northern Finland Birth Cohort 1966 (n = 4,952-5,205, varying by exposure-outcome analysis). Aerobic fitness was assessed by means of heart rate measurement following a standardized submaximal step test; muscular fitness was assessed by means of a maximal isometric handgrip strength test and a test of lower-back trunk muscle endurance. Longer LTL was associated with higher aerobic fitness and better trunk muscle endurance in models including adjustment for age, sex, body mass index, socioeconomic position, diet, smoking, alcohol consumption, physical activity level, and C-reactive protein. In a sex-stratified analysis, LTL was not associated with handgrip strength in either men or women. LTL may relate to aspects of physical fitness in young adulthood, but replication of these findings is required, along with further studies to help assess directions and causality in these associations.
PubMed ID
28338837 View in PubMed
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The associations of physical activity with fracture risk--a 7-year prospective controlled intervention study in 3534 children.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature278550
Source
Osteoporos Int. 2016 Mar;27(3):915-22
Publication Type
Article
Date
Mar-2016
Author
J. Fritz
M E Cöster
J-Å Nilsson
B E Rosengren
M. Dencker
M K Karlsson
Source
Osteoporos Int. 2016 Mar;27(3):915-22
Date
Mar-2016
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Absorptiometry, Photon - methods
Bone Density - physiology
Child
Curriculum
Exercise - physiology
Female
Femur Neck - physiopathology
Follow-Up Studies
Fractures, Bone - epidemiology - physiopathology
Humans
Incidence
Life Style
Male
Muscle Strength - physiology
Muscle, Skeletal - physiopathology
Physical Education and Training - methods
Prospective Studies
Risk Assessment - methods
Spine - physiopathology
Sweden - epidemiology
Abstract
This is the first study indicating an association between gradually diminished risk of fractures and years of increased physical activity. Our results could imply great benefits not only for the individual but also for the healthcare burden and cost of society.
Physical activity (PA) in childhood is associated with high bone mass and beneficial neuromuscular function. We investigate if increased PA also is associated with fracture risk.
We registered fractures in 3534 children aged 6 to 8 years at study start for up to 7 years; 1339 with 40 min of moderate PA every school day (intervention) and 2195 with the Swedish standard curriculum of 60 min of PA per school week (controls). In a subsample of 264 children, we measured areal bone mineral density (aBMD; g/cm(2)) with dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry (femoral neck and total spine) and muscle strength (peak torque for knee extension and flexion; Nm) with computerized dynamometer at baseline and after 7 years. We estimated annual fracture incidence rate ratios (IRR) in the intervention group compared to the control group as well as changes in bone mass and muscle strength. Data is given as mean (95% CI).
The IRR of fractures decreased with each year of the PA intervention (r?=?-0.79; p?=?0.04). During the seventh year, IRR was almost halved [IRR 0.52 (0.27, 1.01)]. The intervention group had a statistically significant greater gain in total spine aBMD with a mean group difference of 0.03 (0.00, 0.05) g/cm(2) and peak flexion torque 180° with a mean group difference of 5.0 (1.5, 8.6) Nm.
Increased PA is associated with decreased fracture risk, probably in part due to beneficial gains in aBMD and muscle strength.
PubMed ID
26359184 View in PubMed
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107 records – page 1 of 11.