Skip header and navigation

Refine By

5 records – page 1 of 1.

Assessment of arm movements during gait in stroke - the Arm Posture Score.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature258787
Source
Gait Posture. 2014 Sep;40(4):549-55
Publication Type
Article
Date
Sep-2014
Author
Gudrun M Johansson
Gunilla E Frykberg
Helena Grip
Eva W Broström
Charlotte K Häger
Source
Gait Posture. 2014 Sep;40(4):549-55
Date
Sep-2014
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aged
Arm - physiopathology
Biomechanical Phenomena
Case-Control Studies
Cross-Sectional Studies
Disability Evaluation
Female
Gait Disorders, Neurologic - physiopathology
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Movement - physiology
Muscle Spasticity - physiopathology
Posture - physiology
Rotation
Stroke - physiopathology
Sweden
Abstract
The purpose of the study was to apply the Arm Posture Score (APS) to a stroke population, since comprehensive measures to quantify arm swing in the affected and non-affected arms during gait are lacking. A further aim was to investigate how gait speed and upper limb function estimated by clinical measures are related to the APS in the stroke group. The APS is the summarized root mean square deviation (RMSD) from normal, based on kinematics. Four arm movements (sagittal and frontal planes) as well as six arm movements (incorporating transversal plane) were included in the calculation of APS, referred to as APS4 and APS6, respectively. The study population consisted of 25 persons with stroke and 25 age- and gender-matched controls. The APS measures were significantly different between the affected and non-affected arms, as well as between the affected arm and the non-dominant arm of the controls (p=0.001). Spasticity significantly influenced both APS measures, while speed only had a significant effect on the APS4. The APS measures correlated significantly to clinical measures of upper limb function. Both APS measures seem to be useful indices to quantify and discriminate between impaired and normal arm swing during gait after stroke. The variability of rotational arm movements needs to be studied further before considering the additional value of the APS6 over the APS4. When interpreting the APS, complementary kinematics should be taken into account, as the single value of the APS gives no information about the direction of the deviation.
PubMed ID
25065628 View in PubMed
Less detail

[Development and function of sex organs in adolescent girls with central spastic paralysis]

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature44376
Source
Pediatr Akus Ginekol. 1969;31(6):33-6
Publication Type
Article
Date
1969

Development of spasticity with age in a total population of children with cerebral palsy.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature91346
Source
BMC Musculoskelet Disord. 2008;9:150
Publication Type
Article
Date
2008
Author
Hägglund Gunnar
Wagner Philippe
Author Affiliation
Department of Orthopaedics, Lund University Hospital, S-221 85 Lund, Sweden. gunnar.hagglund@med.lu.se
Source
BMC Musculoskelet Disord. 2008;9:150
Date
2008
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Aging - physiology
Cerebral Palsy - physiopathology
Child
Child, Preschool
Health Status Indicators
Humans
Infant
Muscle Spasticity - physiopathology
Muscle, Skeletal - physiopathology
Range of Motion, Articular
Severity of Illness Index
Sweden - epidemiology
Abstract
BACKGROUND: The development of spasticity with age in children with cerebral palsy (CP) has, to our knowledge, not been studied before. In 1994, a register and a health care program for children with CP in southern Sweden were initiated. In the programme the child's muscle tone according to the modified Ashworth scale is measured twice a year until six years of age, then once a year. We have used this data to analyse the development of spasticity with age in a total population of children with cerebral palsy. METHODS: All measurements of muscle tone in the gastrocnemius-soleus muscle in all children with CP from 0 to 15 years during the period 1995-2006 were analysed. The CP subtypes were classified according to the Surveillance of Cerebral Palsy in Europe network system. Using these criteria, the study was based on 6218 examinations in 547 children. For the statistical analysis the Ashworth scale was dichotomized. The levels 0-1 were gathered in one category and levels 2-4 in the other. The pattern of development with age was evaluated using piecewise logistic regression in combination with Akaike's An Information Criterion. RESULTS: In the total sample the degree of muscle tone increased up to 4 years of age. After 4 years of age the muscle tone decreased each year up to 12 years of age. A similar development was seen when excluding the children operated with selective dorsal rhizotomy, intrathecal baclofen pump or tendo Achilles lengthening. At 4 years of age about 47% of the children had spasticity in their gastro-soleus muscle graded as Ashworth 2-4. After 12 years of age 23% of the children had that level of spasticity. The CP subtypes spastic bilateral and spastic unilateral CP showed the same pattern as the total sample. Children with dyskinetic type of CP showed an increasing muscle tone up to age 6, followed by a decreasing pattern up to age 15. CONCLUSION: In children with CP, the muscle tone as measured with the Ashworth scale increases up to 4 years of age and then decreases up to 12 years of age. The same tendency is seen in all spastic subtypes. The findings may have implications both for clinical judgement and for research studies on spasticity treatment.
PubMed ID
18990204 View in PubMed
Less detail

Hand function in cerebral palsy. Report of 367 children in a population-based longitudinal health care program.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature91603
Source
J Hand Surg Am. 2008 Oct;33(8):1337-47
Publication Type
Article
Date
Oct-2008
Author
Arner Marianne
Eliasson A-C
Nicklasson S.
Sommerstein K.
Hägglund G.
Author Affiliation
Department of Hand Surgery, Stockholm South Hospital, Stockholm, Sweden. marianne.arner@sodersjukhuset.se
Source
J Hand Surg Am. 2008 Oct;33(8):1337-47
Date
Oct-2008
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Age Factors
Cerebral Palsy - classification - complications - rehabilitation
Child
Child, Preschool
Delivery of Health Care - organization & administration
Disability Evaluation
Female
Follow-Up Studies
Hand Deformities, Congenital - etiology - rehabilitation
Hand Joints - physiopathology
Hand Strength
Humans
Infant
Longitudinal Studies
Male
Motor Skills
Muscle Spasticity - physiopathology
Population Surveillance
Range of Motion, Articular
Registries
Risk assessment
Sweden
Task Performance and Analysis
Abstract
PURPOSE: To describe aspects of hand function in a total population of children with cerebral palsy (CP). METHODS: Upper extremity data were collected for 367 children who were born between 1992 and 2001 and were registered in a population-based health care program for children with CP. Hand function was classified according to the Manual Ability Classification System (MACS), the House functional classification, and the Zancolli classification. The type of spastic thumb-in-palm deformity was evaluated according to House. RESULTS: In the total population of children with CP aged 4 to 14 years, 60% had more than minor problems with hand function (>MACS I). Independence in age-relevant, daily manual activities (MACS I-II) was noted in 87% of children with spastic unilateral CP and in 63% of children with spastic bilateral CP, but in only 20% of children with dyskinetic CP. According to the House functional classification, both hands were spontaneously and independently used in 55% of children (House 7-8), whereas 5% did not use either of their hands (House 0). Minor increase of flexor muscle tone (Zancolli level 1) was found in 69% of all children. Only 2% were in level 3 in both hands. Spastic thumb-in-palm deformity in 1 hand was found in 25% and in both hands in another 15%. CONCLUSIONS: Limitations in hand function are common in all types of CP, but characteristics of the disability vary considerably between different CP subtypes. The MACS classification is useful to evaluate how well children can handle objects in daily activities. The House functional classification describes grip function in each hand separately; the Zancolli classification of finger and wrist extension and the classification of thumb-in-palm deformity according to House give an estimate of dynamic spasticity. All these classifications were shown to be useful in a population-based health care program, but further studies of the psychometric properties are required.
PubMed ID
18929198 View in PubMed
Less detail

[The effect of electromyostimulation on the clinico-electroencephalographic indices in the rehabilitation of patients with spastic forms of infantile cerebral palsy]

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature33470
Source
Lik Sprava. 1998 Oct-Nov;(7):150-2
Publication Type
Article
Author
O L Pelekh
Source
Lik Sprava. 1998 Oct-Nov;(7):150-2
Language
Ukrainian
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Brain - physiopathology
Cerebral Palsy - physiopathology - rehabilitation
Child
Child, Preschool
Electric Stimulation Therapy - instrumentation - methods
Electroencephalography
Electrophysiology
English Abstract
Humans
Muscle Spasticity - physiopathology - rehabilitation
Muscle, Skeletal - physiopathology
Abstract
In a series of paediatric patient population, thirty children presenting with spastic forms of cerebral palsy demonstrated certain differences in the brain bioelectrical activity. In hemiparesis patients, there was an unusual frequency of alpha-rhythm and slow-wave activity as per EEG recordings. Following applied electrical stimulation an increase was noted in brain electrogenesis rate as was improvement of corticosubcortical relationships. In patients presenting with hemiparetic form, changes in brain electrogenesis were believed to suggest activation of cortical mechanisms against the background of reduction in the activity in subcortical structures.
PubMed ID
10050489 View in PubMed
Less detail