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Adults with complex congenital heart disease have impaired skeletal muscle function and reduced confidence in performing exercise training.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature275846
Source
Eur J Prev Cardiol. 2015 Dec;22(12):1523-30
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-2015
Author
Camilla Sandberg
Ulf Thilén
Karin Wadell
Bengt Johansson
Source
Eur J Prev Cardiol. 2015 Dec;22(12):1523-30
Date
Dec-2015
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Aged
Case-Control Studies
Cross-Sectional Studies
Exercise Test
Exercise Tolerance
Female
Health Behavior
Health Knowledge, Attitudes, Practice
Heart Defects, Congenital - diagnosis - physiopathology - psychology
Humans
Isotonic Contraction
Male
Middle Aged
Muscle, Skeletal - physiopathology
Pressure
Respiration
Respiratory Muscles - physiopathology
Self Efficacy
Sweden
Young Adult
Abstract
Adults with congenital heart disease (ACHD) usually have reduced aerobic exercise capacity compared with controls. However, their skeletal muscle function is less studied.
In this cross-sectional study, unilateral isotonic shoulder flexion, unilateral isotonic heel-lift, maximum inspiratory pressure (MIP) and maximum expiratory pressure (MEP) were tested in 85 patients with ACHD (35 women, mean age 36.8?±?14.8 years), classed as either 'complex' (n?=?43) or 'simple' (n?=?42), and 42 age and gender matched controls (16 women, mean age 36.9?±?14.9). Maximum number of shoulder flexions and heel-lifts were measured. MIP/MEP was tested using a handheld respiratory pressure meter. Exercise self-efficacy, measuring confidence in performing exercise training, was evaluated.
Adults with complex lesions performed fewer shoulder flexions compared with controls and patients with simple lesions (28.2?±?11.1 vs. 63.6?±?40.4, p?
PubMed ID
25038081 View in PubMed
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Ambulant children with spastic cerebral palsy and their parents' perceptions and expectations prior to multilevel surgery.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature97734
Source
Dev Neurorehabil. 2010;13(2):80-7
Publication Type
Article
Date
2010
Author
Hilde Capjon
Ida Torunn Bjørk
Author Affiliation
Rikshospitalet, Oslo University Hospital, Department of Child Neurology, Oslo, Norway. hilde.capjon@rikshopitalet.no
Source
Dev Neurorehabil. 2010;13(2):80-7
Date
2010
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Cerebral Palsy - physiopathology - rehabilitation - surgery
Child
Disabled Children - psychology - rehabilitation
Fatigue - prevention & control
Female
Humans
Male
Muscle Contraction
Muscle, Skeletal - physiopathology
Norway
Pain - prevention & control
Parents - psychology
Quality of Life
Questionnaires
Severity of Illness Index
Walking
Abstract
PURPOSE: This study explores the pre-operative situation of children accepted for multilevel surgery for cerebral palsy (CP) and their parents. METHODS: Eight ambulatory children with varied severity of spastic CP and their parents were included. Qualitative, semi-structured interviews were carried out separately with the children and parents. RESULTS: Everyday life of the children and their parents was vulnerable. The degree to which children strived for social acceptance and normality increased their pain. Deteriorating physical capacity resulted in pain and fatigue and was the parents' and children's main motivation for the operation. Although the parents were ambivalent to the operation they mediated hope and cautious optimism about a better life for their children. CONCLUSION: Parents' and children's experiences imply the need for improvements to ensure facilitation for disabled children in schools and all levels of the health service, equality of communication and awareness-raising in the pre-operative phase of multilevel surgery.
PubMed ID
20222768 View in PubMed
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Are perceived muscle tension, electromyographic hyperactivity and personality traits correlated in the fibromyalgia syndrome?

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature190165
Source
J Rehabil Med. 2002 Mar;34(2):73-9
Publication Type
Article
Date
Mar-2002
Author
Sally Aspegren Kendall
Jessica Elert
Lisa Ekselius
Björn Gerdle
Author Affiliation
Department of Rehabilitation Medicine, Faculty of Health Sciences, Linköping, Sweden. sally.a.kendall@inr.liu.se
Source
J Rehabil Med. 2002 Mar;34(2):73-9
Date
Mar-2002
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Electromyography
Female
Fibromyalgia - diagnosis - physiopathology - psychology
Humans
Middle Aged
Muscle Contraction - physiology
Muscle, Skeletal - physiopathology
Pain Measurement
Personality
Personality Assessment
Prognosis
Prospective Studies
Range of Motion, Articular - physiology
Risk assessment
Sampling Studies
Sensitivity and specificity
Severity of Illness Index
Shoulder Joint
Sweden
Syndrome
Abstract
The study was performed to investigate the relationship between perceived muscle tension and electromyographic hyperactivity and to what extent electromyographic (EMG) hyperactivity relates to personality traits in fibromyalgics. Thirty-six females with fibromyalgia performed isokinetic maximal forward flexions of the shoulder combined with surface EMG recordings of the trapezius and infraspinatus muscles. Signal amplitude ratio and peak torque were calculated in the initial and endurance test phases. Pain intensity, perceived general and local shoulder muscle tension, and personality traits using the Karolinska Scales of Personality were assessed pre-test. Neither perceived muscle tension nor muscular tension personality trait correlated with EMG muscle hyperactivity. Perceived general muscle tension correlated with aspects of anxiety proneness (including muscle tension) of the Karolinska Scales of Personality. Pain intensity interacted with many of the variables. We propose that when patients with fibromyalgia report muscle tension that they may be expressing something other than physiological muscle tension.
PubMed ID
12019583 View in PubMed
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Assessing the effect of high-repetitive single limb exercises (HRSLE) on exercise capacity and quality of life in patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD): study protocol for randomized controlled trial.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature122375
Source
Trials. 2012;13:114
Publication Type
Article
Date
2012
Author
Andre Nyberg
Britta Lindström
Karin Wadell
Author Affiliation
Department of Community Medicine and Rehabilitation, Physiotherapy, Umeå University, Umeå 90187, Sweden. andre.nyberg@physiother.umu.se
Source
Trials. 2012;13:114
Date
2012
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Anxiety - etiology
Depression - etiology
Exercise Test
Exercise Tolerance
Female
Humans
Lower Extremity
Male
Muscle strength
Muscle, Skeletal - physiopathology
Physical Endurance
Prospective Studies
Pulmonary Disease, Chronic Obstructive - diagnosis - physiopathology - psychology - therapy
Quality of Life
Questionnaires
Research Design
Resistance Training
Sweden
Time Factors
Treatment Outcome
Upper Extremity
Abstract
Single-limb knee extension exercises have been found to be effective at improving lower extremity exercise capacity in patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD). Since the positive local physiological effects of exercise training only occur in the engaged muscle(s), should upper extremity muscles also be included to determine the effect of single limb exercises in COPD patients.
a prospective, assessor-blind, block randomized controlled, parallel-group multicenter trial.
stage II-IV COPD patients, > 40?years of age, ex-smokers, with stable medical treatment will be included starting May 2011. Recruitment at three locations in Sweden.
1) high-repetitive single limb exercise (HRSLE) training with elastic bands, 60 minutes, three times/week for 8?weeks combined with four sessions of 60 minutes patient education, or 2) the same patient education alone.
Primary: determine the effects of HRSLE on local muscle endurance capacity (measured as meters walked during 6-minute walk test and rings moved on 6-minute ring and pegboard test) and quality of life (measured as change on the Swedish version of the Chronic Respiratory Disease Questionnaire). Secondary: effects on maximal strength, muscular endurance, dyspnea, self-efficacy, anxiety and depression. The relationship between changes in health-related variables and changes in exercise capacity, sex-related differences in training effects, feasibility of the program, strategies to determine adequate starting resistance and provide accurate resistance for each involved movement and the relationship between muscle fatigue and dyspnea in the different exercise tests will also be analyzed. Randomization: performed by a person independent of the recruitment process and using a computer random number generator. Stratification by center and gender with a 1:1 allocation to the intervention or control using random block sizes. Blinding: all outcome assessors will be blinded to group assignment.
The results of this project will contribute to increase the body of knowledge regarding COPD and HRSLE.
Notes
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PubMed ID
22823966 View in PubMed
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The associations of physical activity with fracture risk--a 7-year prospective controlled intervention study in 3534 children.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature278550
Source
Osteoporos Int. 2016 Mar;27(3):915-22
Publication Type
Article
Date
Mar-2016
Author
J. Fritz
M E Cöster
J-Å Nilsson
B E Rosengren
M. Dencker
M K Karlsson
Source
Osteoporos Int. 2016 Mar;27(3):915-22
Date
Mar-2016
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Absorptiometry, Photon - methods
Bone Density - physiology
Child
Curriculum
Exercise - physiology
Female
Femur Neck - physiopathology
Follow-Up Studies
Fractures, Bone - epidemiology - physiopathology
Humans
Incidence
Life Style
Male
Muscle Strength - physiology
Muscle, Skeletal - physiopathology
Physical Education and Training - methods
Prospective Studies
Risk Assessment - methods
Spine - physiopathology
Sweden - epidemiology
Abstract
This is the first study indicating an association between gradually diminished risk of fractures and years of increased physical activity. Our results could imply great benefits not only for the individual but also for the healthcare burden and cost of society.
Physical activity (PA) in childhood is associated with high bone mass and beneficial neuromuscular function. We investigate if increased PA also is associated with fracture risk.
We registered fractures in 3534 children aged 6 to 8 years at study start for up to 7 years; 1339 with 40 min of moderate PA every school day (intervention) and 2195 with the Swedish standard curriculum of 60 min of PA per school week (controls). In a subsample of 264 children, we measured areal bone mineral density (aBMD; g/cm(2)) with dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry (femoral neck and total spine) and muscle strength (peak torque for knee extension and flexion; Nm) with computerized dynamometer at baseline and after 7 years. We estimated annual fracture incidence rate ratios (IRR) in the intervention group compared to the control group as well as changes in bone mass and muscle strength. Data is given as mean (95% CI).
The IRR of fractures decreased with each year of the PA intervention (r?=?-0.79; p?=?0.04). During the seventh year, IRR was almost halved [IRR 0.52 (0.27, 1.01)]. The intervention group had a statistically significant greater gain in total spine aBMD with a mean group difference of 0.03 (0.00, 0.05) g/cm(2) and peak flexion torque 180° with a mean group difference of 5.0 (1.5, 8.6) Nm.
Increased PA is associated with decreased fracture risk, probably in part due to beneficial gains in aBMD and muscle strength.
PubMed ID
26359184 View in PubMed
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Central adaptation of pain perception in response to rehabilitation of musculoskeletal pain: randomized controlled trial.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature120497
Source
Pain Physician. 2012 Sep-Oct;15(5):385-94
Publication Type
Article
Author
Lars L Andersen
Christoffer H Andersen
Emil Sundstrup
Markus D Jakobsen
Ole S Mortensen
Mette K Zebis
Author Affiliation
National Research Centre for the Working Environment, Copenhagen, Denmark. lla74@outlook.com
Source
Pain Physician. 2012 Sep-Oct;15(5):385-94
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adaptation, physiological - physiology
Adult
Denmark
Double-Blind Method
Exercise Therapy - methods
Female
Follow-Up Studies
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Muscle, Skeletal - physiopathology
Musculoskeletal Pain - physiopathology - psychology - rehabilitation
Pain Measurement
Pain Perception - physiology
Pain Threshold - physiology
Shoulder - physiopathology
Time Factors
Abstract
Understanding the mechanisms of long-standing musculoskeletal pain and adaptations in response to physical rehabilitation is important for developing optimal treatment strategies. The influence of central adaptations of pain perception in response to rehabilitation of musculoskeletal pain remains unclear.
To investigate the effect of neck/shoulder resistance training on pressure pain threshold (PPT) of the painful neck/shoulder muscles (upper trapezius) and a non-painful reference muscle of the leg (tibialis anterior) in adults with neck/shoulder pain.
Examiner-blinded, parallel-group randomized controlled trial with allocation concealment.
ISRCTN60264809 SETTING: Office workplaces in the capital of Denmark.
The study contained 198 adults with frequent neck/shoulder pain (174 women and 24 men, mean: age 43 years, duration of pain 186 days during the previous year, computer use 93% of work time) were randomly allocated to 10 weeks of specific resistance training for the neck/shoulder muscles for 2 or 12 minutes per day 5 times a week, or weekly information on general health (control group). Primary outcomes were changes in PPT of the painful neck/shoulder muscles (upper trapezius) and a distant non-painful reference muscle (tibialis anterior) at 10 weeks.
PPT of both the trained painful trapezius and the non-trained reference muscle of the leg increased more in the training groups compared with the control group (P
PubMed ID
22996850 View in PubMed
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Characteristics of children with hip displacement in cerebral palsy.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature87624
Source
BMC Musculoskelet Disord. 2007;8:101
Publication Type
Article
Date
2007
Author
Hägglund Gunnar
Lauge-Pedersen Henrik
Wagner Philippe
Author Affiliation
Department of Orthopaedics, Lund University Hospital, S-221 85 Lund, Sweden. gunnar.hagglund@med.lu.se
Source
BMC Musculoskelet Disord. 2007;8:101
Date
2007
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Age Distribution
Cerebral Palsy - epidemiology - physiopathology
Child
Child, Preschool
Cohort Studies
Comorbidity
Disease Progression
Female
Hip Dislocation - epidemiology - physiopathology - radiography
Humans
Incidence
Longitudinal Studies
Male
Mass Screening
Muscle, Skeletal - physiopathology
Predictive value of tests
Prognosis
Quadriplegia - epidemiology - physiopathology
Radiography - standards
Registries
Risk factors
Sweden - epidemiology
Abstract
BACKGROUND: Hip dislocation in children with cerebral palsy (CP) is a common and severe problem. The dislocation can be avoided, by screening and preventive treatment of children with hips at risk. The aim of this study was to analyse the characteristics of children with CP who develop hip displacement, in order to optimise a hip surveillance programme. METHODS: In a total population of children with CP a standardised clinical and radiological follow-up of the hips was carried out as a part of a hip prevention programme. The present study is based on 212 children followed until 9-16 years of age. RESULTS: Of the 212 children, 38 (18%) developed displacement with Migration Percentage (MP) >40% and further 19 (9%) MP between 33 and 39%. Mean age at first registration of hip displacement was 4 years, but some hips showed MP > 40% already at two years of age. The passive range of hip motion at the time of first registration of hip displacement did not differ significantly from the findings in hips without displacement.The risk of hip displacement varied according to CP-subtype, from 0% in children with pure ataxia to 79% in children with spastic tetraplegia. The risk of displacement (MP > 40%) was directly related to the level of gross motor function, classified according to the gross motor function classification system, GMFCS, from 0% in children in GMFCS level I to 64% in GMFCS level V. CONCLUSION: Hip displacement in CP often occurs already at 2-3 years of age. Range of motion is a poor indicator of hips at risk. Thus early identification and early radiographic examination of children at risk is of great importance. The risk of hip displacement varies according to both CP-subtype and GMFCS. It is sometimes not possible to determine subtype before 4 years of age, and at present several definitions and classification systems are used. GMFCS is valid and reliable from 2 years of age, and it is internationally accepted.We recommend a hip surveillance programme for children with CP with radiographic examinations based on the child's age and GMFCS level.
PubMed ID
17963501 View in PubMed
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Characteristics of the leg extensors in male volleyball players with jumper's knee.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature212034
Source
Am J Sports Med. 1996 May-Jun;24(3):380-5
Publication Type
Article
Author
O. Lian
L. Engebretsen
R V Ovrebø
R. Bahr
Author Affiliation
Norwegian Volleyball Federation, Rud, Norway.
Source
Am J Sports Med. 1996 May-Jun;24(3):380-5
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Athletic Injuries - physiopathology
Biomechanical Phenomena
Case-Control Studies
Cumulative Trauma Disorders - physiopathology
Humans
Knee Injuries - physiopathology
Knee Joint - physiopathology
Leg
Male
Muscle Contraction
Muscle, Skeletal - physiopathology
Norway
Patellar Ligament - injuries - physiopathology
Posture
Psychomotor Performance
Range of Motion, Articular
Stress, mechanical
Weight-Bearing
Abstract
The aim of the present study was to characterize the performance ability of the leg extensor apparatus in a group of athletes with jumper's knee and to compare the results with those of a matched control group without knee symptoms. Patient and control groups (12 players in each) were selected from a population of 141 well-trained male Norwegian volleyball players, of which 55 (39%) satisfied the diagnostic criteria for jumper's knee. The testing program consisted of a standing jump, a countermovement jump, a 15-second rebound jump test, a standing jump with a 20-kg load, and a standing jump with a load corresponding to one-half of the subject's body weight. Jump height and power were measured using a contact mat connected to an electronic timer. The test results of the patient group were significantly higher than those of the control group for the countermovement jump (15% increase), power during rebound jump (41%), work done in standing jump (12%) and countermovement jump (22%), and the difference between countermovement jump and standing jump (effect of adding eccentric component). Athletes with jumper's knee demonstrated better performance in jump tests than uninjured athletes, particularly in ballistic jumps involving eccentric force generation.
PubMed ID
8734892 View in PubMed
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Clinical signs of temporomandibular disorders and various pain conditions among children 6 to 8 years of age: the PANIC study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature127471
Source
J Orofac Pain. 2012;26(1):17-25
Publication Type
Article
Date
2012
Author
Anu Vierola
Anna Liisa Suominen
Tiina Ikavalko
Niina Lintu
Virpi Lindi
Hanna-Maaria Lakka
Jari Kellokoski
Matti Narhi
Timo A Lakka
Author Affiliation
University of Eastern Finland, Finland.
Source
J Orofac Pain. 2012;26(1):17-25
Date
2012
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Activities of Daily Living
Analgesics - therapeutic use
Back Pain - epidemiology
Child
Facial Pain - epidemiology
Female
Finland - epidemiology
Headache - epidemiology
Humans
Lower Extremity - physiopathology
Male
Mandible - physiopathology
Masticatory Muscles - physiopathology
Muscle, Skeletal - physiopathology
Musculoskeletal Pain - epidemiology
Neck Pain - epidemiology
Office visits - statistics & numerical data
Pain Measurement
Population Surveillance
Prevalence
Range of Motion, Articular - physiology
Risk assessment
Sex Factors
Shoulder Pain - epidemiology
Sound
Temporomandibular Joint Disorders - epidemiology
Abstract
To examine the prevalence and significance of clinically determined signs of temporomandibular disorders (TMD) and pain in different parts of the body as well as the frequency, intensity, and other features of pain in children.
The subjects were a population-based sample of children 6 to 8 years of age. Complete data on clinical signs of TMD were available for 483 children. Data on pain during the past 3 months, assessed by a questionnaire administered by parents, were available for 424 children. Differences between the prevalence of at least one sign of TMD and the location or frequency of pain were evaluated using the chi-square test, as well as the associations between the prevalence, frequency, and location of pain and gender, the use of medication, and visits to a physician. The relationship of various pain conditions with the risk of having clinical signs of TMD was analyzed using logistic regression.
Of the 483 children, 171 (35%) had at least one clinical sign of TMD. Of the 424 children, 226 (53%) had experienced pain during the past 3 months. Pain was most prevalent in the lower limbs (35%) and head (32%). Of the 226 children with pain, 119 (53%) had experienced frequent pain (= once a week). No gender differences were found. The risk of having at least one clinical sign of TMD was 3.0 (95% confidence intervals [CI]: 1.1-8.5, P
PubMed ID
22292136 View in PubMed
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Current and maintained health-enhancing physical activity in rheumatoid arthritis: a cross-sectional study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature117092
Source
Arthritis Care Res (Hoboken). 2013 Jul;65(7):1166-76
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jul-2013
Author
Ingrid Demmelmaier
Patrick Bergman
Birgitta Nordgren
Irene Jensen
Christina H Opava
Author Affiliation
Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden. ingrid.demmelmaier@ki.se
Source
Arthritis Care Res (Hoboken). 2013 Jul;65(7):1166-76
Date
Jul-2013
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Arthritis, Rheumatoid - diagnosis - physiopathology - psychology
Chi-Square Distribution
Cross-Sectional Studies
Exercise
Female
Health Behavior
Health Knowledge, Attitudes, Practice
Health status
Health Status Indicators
Humans
Logistic Models
Male
Middle Aged
Motor Activity
Multivariate Analysis
Muscle strength
Muscle, Skeletal - physiopathology
Odds Ratio
Questionnaires
Registries
Resistance Training
Self Efficacy
Social Support
Sweden
Time Factors
Young Adult
Abstract
To describe and identify the explanatory factors of variation in current and maintained health-enhancing physical activity (HEPA) in persons with rheumatoid arthritis (RA).
In this cross-sectional study, current HEPA was assessed with the International Physical Activity Questionnaire and maintained HEPA with the Exercise Stage Assessment Instrument, the latter explicitly focusing on both aerobic physical activity and muscle strength training. Sociodemographic, disease-related, and psychosocial data were retrieved from the Swedish Rheumatology Quality (SRQ) registers and a postal questionnaire. The explained variations in the respective HEPA behaviors were analyzed with logistic regression.
In all, 3,152 (58.5%) of 5,391 persons identified as eligible from the SRQ registers responded to the questionnaire. Current HEPA was reported by 69%, and maintained HEPA by 11% of the respondents. The most salient and consistent factors explaining variation in both current and maintained HEPA were self-efficacy, social support, and outcome expectations related to physical activity.
To our knowledge, this is the first study exploring maintained physical activity in a large well-defined sample of persons with RA. Our results indicate that a minority perform maintained HEPA, including both aerobic physical activity and muscle strength training, and that psychosocial factors are the most salient and consistent in the explanation of HEPA variation.
PubMed ID
23335505 View in PubMed
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57 records – page 1 of 6.