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127 records – page 1 of 13.

Adaptations to Short, Frequent Sessions of Endurance and Strength Training Are Similar to Longer, Less Frequent Exercise Sessions When the Total Volume Is the Same.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature274072
Source
J Strength Cond Res. 2015 Nov;29 Suppl 11:S46-51
Publication Type
Article
Date
Nov-2015
Author
Anders Kilen
Line B Hjelvang
Niels Dall
Nanna L Kruse
Nikolai B Nordsborg
Source
J Strength Cond Res. 2015 Nov;29 Suppl 11:S46-51
Date
Nov-2015
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adaptation, physiological - physiology
Adult
Denmark
Exercise - physiology
Female
Humans
Male
Military Personnel
Muscle Strength - physiology
Muscle, Skeletal - physiology
Oxygen Consumption - physiology
Physical Conditioning, Human - methods
Resistance Training - methods
Abstract
The hypothesis that the distribution of weekly training across several short sessions, as opposed to fewer longer sessions, enhances maximal strength gain without compromising maximal oxygen uptake was evaluated. Twenty-nine subjects completed an 8-week controlled parallel-group training intervention. One group ("micro training" [MI]: n = 21) performed nine 15-minute training sessions weekly, whereas a second group ("classical training" [CL]: n = 8) completed exactly the same training on a weekly basis but as three 45-minute sessions. For each group, each session comprised exclusively strength, high-intensity cardiovascular training or muscle endurance training. Both groups increased shuttle run performance (MI: 1,373 ± 133 m vs. 1,498 ± 126 m, p = 0.05; CL: 1,074 ± 213 m vs. 1,451 ± 202 m, p
PubMed ID
26506198 View in PubMed
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Affective responses to changes in day length in Siberian hamsters (Phodopus sungorus).

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature45723
Source
Psychoneuroendocrinology. 2005 Jun;30(5):438-52
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-2005
Author
Brian J Prendergast
Randy J Nelson
Author Affiliation
Department of Psychology, University of Chicago, Chicago, IL 60637, USA. prendergast@uchicago.edu
Source
Psychoneuroendocrinology. 2005 Jun;30(5):438-52
Date
Jun-2005
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Animals
Anxiety - psychology
Attention - physiology
Behavior, Animal - physiology
Body Weight - physiology
Conflict (Psychology)
Cricetinae
Depression - psychology
Emotions - physiology
Exploratory Behavior - physiology
Female
Light
Motor Activity - physiology
Muscle, Skeletal - physiology
Phodopus
Photoperiod
Research Support, U.S. Gov't, Non-P.H.S.
Research Support, U.S. Gov't, P.H.S.
Smell - physiology
Startle Reaction - physiology
Swimming - psychology
Abstract
The goal of these experiments was to test the hypothesis that day length influences anxious- and depressive-like behaviors in reproductively photoperiodic rodents. Male and female Siberian hamsters (Phodopus sungorus) were exposed to long (16 h light/day; LD) or short (8 h light/day; SD) photoperiods beginning at the time of weaning (day 18). Two weeks later hamsters were subjected to a series of behavioral tests to quantify anxiety-and depressive-like behaviors. In an elevated plus maze, SD males exhibited longer latencies to enter an open arm, entered fewer open arms, and spent less time exploring open arms relative to LD hamsters. SD males were likewise slower to enter either of the distal arms of a completely enclosed T-maze, and in a hunger-motivated exploratory paradigm SD males were slower to enter an open arena for food as compared to LD males. In a forced-swimming model of behavioral despair, SD males exhibited immobility sooner, more often, and for a greater total amount of time relative to LD males. Total activity levels, aversiveness to light, olfactory function, and limb strength were unaffected by SD, suggesting that the behavioral changes consequent to SD are not attributable to sensory or motor deficits, but rather may arise from changes in general affective state. The anxiogenic and depressive effects of SD were largely absent in female hamsters. Together the results indicate that adaptation to short photoperiods is associated with increased expression of anxiety- and depressive-like behaviors relative to those observed under LD photoperiod conditions.
PubMed ID
15721056 View in PubMed
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Altered knee joint neuromuscular control during landing from a jump in 10-15 year old children with Generalised Joint Hypermobility. A substudy of the CHAMPS-study Denmark.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature268916
Source
J Electromyogr Kinesiol. 2015 Jun;25(3):501-7
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-2015
Author
Tina Junge
Niels Wedderkopp
Jonas Bloch Thorlund
Karen Søgaard
Birgit Juul-Kristensen
Source
J Electromyogr Kinesiol. 2015 Jun;25(3):501-7
Date
Jun-2015
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Child
Cohort Studies
Denmark - epidemiology
Female
Humans
Joint Instability - diagnosis - epidemiology - physiopathology
Knee Joint - physiology - physiopathology
Longitudinal Studies
Male
Motor Activity - physiology
Muscle Contraction - physiology
Muscle, Skeletal - physiology - physiopathology
Quadriceps Muscle - physiology - physiopathology
Abstract
Generalised Joint Hypermobility (GJH) is considered an intrinsic risk factor for knee injuries. Knee neuromuscular control during landing may be altered in GJH due to reduced passive stability. The aim was to identify differences in knee neuromuscular control during landing of the Single-Leg-Hop-for-Distance test (SLHD) in 25 children with GJH compared to 29 children without GJH (controls), all 10-15years. Inclusion criteria for GJH: Beighton score?5/9 and minimum one hypermobile knee. EMG was recorded from the quadriceps, the hamstring and the calf muscles, presented relative to Maximum Voluntary Electrical activity (MVE). There was no difference in jump length between groups. Before landing, GJH had 33% lower Semitendinosus, but 32% higher Gastrocnemius Medialis activity and 39% higher co contraction of the lateral knee muscles, than controls. After landing, GJH had 36% lower Semitendinosus activity than controls, all significant findings. Although the groups performed equally in SLHD, GJH had a Gastrocnemius Medialis dominated neuromuscular strategy before landing, plausibly caused by reduced Semitendinosus activity. Reduced Semitendinosus activity was seen in GJH after landing, but with no compensatory Gastrocnemius Medialis activity. Reduced pre and post-activation of the Semitendinosus may present a risk factor for traumatic knee injuries as ACL ruptures in GJH with knee hypermobility.
PubMed ID
25801907 View in PubMed
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Anaerobic power and muscle strength characteristics of 11 years old elite and non-elite boys and girls from gymnastics, team handball, tennis and swimming.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature31454
Source
Scand J Med Sci Sports. 2002 Jun;12(3):171-8
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-2002
Author
J. Bencke
R. Damsgaard
A. Saekmose
P. Jørgensen
K. Jørgensen
K. Klausen
Author Affiliation
The Copenhagen Study Group of Children in SportsInstitute of Exercise and Sports Sciences, Department of Human Physiology, University of Copenhagen, Denmark.
Source
Scand J Med Sci Sports. 2002 Jun;12(3):171-8
Date
Jun-2002
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Anaerobic Threshold
Analysis of Variance
Anthropometry
Child
Comparative Study
Female
Gymnastics - physiology
Humans
Male
Muscle, Skeletal - physiology
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Sports - physiology
Statistics, nonparametric
Swimming - physiology
Tennis - physiology
Abstract
The aim of the present investigation was to study the possible effects of specificity of training on muscle strength and anaerobic power in children from different sports and at different performance levels in relation to growth and maturation status. Hundred and eighty-four children of both gender participating either in swimming, tennis, team handball or gymnastics were recruited from the best clubs in Denmark. Within each sport, the coach had divided the children into an elite (E) and non-elite (NE) group according to performance level and talent. Tanner stage assessment and body weight and height measurements were performed by a physician. The anaerobic performances were assessed by Wingate tests and jumping performance in squat jump (SJ), countermovement jump (CMJ) and drop jump (DJ) from two heights. Most of the differences between groups in Wingate performance disappeared when the data were normalised to body mass. The gymnasts were the best jumpers and their superiority were increased in the more complex motor coordination tasks like DJ. The results may indicate some influence of training specificity, especially on the more complex motor tasks as DJ and there may be an effect of training before puberty. The performance in the less complex motor tasks like cycling and SJ and CMJ may also be influenced by specific training, but not to the same extent, and heritance may be an important factor for performance in these anaerobic tasks.
PubMed ID
12135450 View in PubMed
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An exploration of the drive for muscularity in adolescent boys and girls.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature198139
Source
J Am Coll Health. 2000 May;48(6):297-304
Publication Type
Article
Date
May-2000
Author
D R McCreary
D K Sasse
Author Affiliation
Regina Health District in Regina, Saskatchewan, Canada.
Source
J Am Coll Health. 2000 May;48(6):297-304
Date
May-2000
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adolescent Behavior
Adult
Body Image
Canada
Drive
Female
Humans
Male
Muscle, Skeletal - physiology
Questionnaires
Self Concept
Sensitivity and specificity
Sex Factors
Weight Lifting
Abstract
Much of the existing research on disordered eating has centered on the drive for thinness, which is most commonly observed in girls and women. The male standard of bodily attractiveness, however, is bigger, bulkier, and more muscular. Are boys and men motivated to be big and muscular in the same way that girls and women are motivated to be thin? The authors constructed a 15-item survey and administered it to 197 adolescents. The findings showed that the drive for muscularity measure displayed good reliability; that individuals high in the drive were more likely to be boys who were trying to gain both weight and muscle mass; that the drive was related to poor self-esteem and higher levels of depression among boys, but not among girls; and that the drive for muscularity was relatively unrelated to the drive for thinness.
PubMed ID
10863873 View in PubMed
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Animals and spaceflight: from survival to understanding.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature164368
Source
J Musculoskelet Neuronal Interact. 2007 Jan-Mar;7(1):17-25
Publication Type
Article
Author
E R Morey-Holton
E L Hill
K A Souza
Author Affiliation
NASA Ames Research Center, Moffet Field, CA 94035-1000, USA. eholton@mail.arc.nasa.gov
Source
J Musculoskelet Neuronal Interact. 2007 Jan-Mar;7(1):17-25
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Animals
Animals, Laboratory
Fractures, Bone - pathology
History, 20th Century
Humans
Larva - physiology
Muscle, Skeletal - physiology
Musculoskeletal Physiological Phenomena
Quail
Rats
Russia
Space Flight - history
United States
Weightlessness - adverse effects
Abstract
Animals have been a critical component of the spaceflight program since its inception. The Russians orbited a dog one month after the Sputnik satellite was launched. The dog mission spurred U.S. interest in animal flights. The animal missions proved that individuals aboard a spacecraft not only could survive, but also could carry out tasks during launch, near-weightlessness, and re-entry; humans were launched into space only after the early animal flights demonstrated that spaceflight was safe and survivable. After these humble beginnings when animals preceded humans in space as pioneers, a dynamic research program was begun using animals as human surrogates aboard manned and unmanned space platforms to understand how the unique environment of space alters life. In this review article, the following questions have been addressed: How did animal research in space evolve? What happened to animal development when gravity decreased? How have animal experiments in space contributed to our understanding of musculoskeletal changes and fracture repair during exposure to reduced gravity?
PubMed ID
17396002 View in PubMed
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Assessment of peak power and short-term work capacity.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature49768
Source
Eur J Appl Physiol. 2003 Feb;88(6):572-9
Publication Type
Article
Date
Feb-2003
Author
Brian R MacIntosh
Peter Rishaug
Krista Svedahl
Author Affiliation
Human Performance Laboratory, Faculty of Kinesiology, University of Calgary, Alberta, Canada, T2N 1N4. brian@kin.ucalgary.ca
Source
Eur J Appl Physiol. 2003 Feb;88(6):572-9
Date
Feb-2003
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Energy Metabolism - physiology
Exercise - physiology
Exercise Test - instrumentation - methods - standards
Exertion - physiology
Female
Friction
Humans
Leg - physiology
Male
Muscle Fatigue - physiology
Muscle, Skeletal - physiology
Psychomotor Performance - physiology
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Stress, mechanical
Weight-Bearing - physiology
Abstract
The purpose of this study was to evaluate conditions for conducting a 30 s Wingate test such as load selection, and the method of starting the test (stationary or flying start). Nine male and four female athletes volunteered to be tested on four laboratory visits. Tests were performed on a modified Monark cycle ergometer (Varberg, Sweden) equipped with force transducers on the friction belt and an optical encoder for velocity measurement. Power was calculated with the moment of inertia (I) of the flywheel taken into consideration. One laboratory visit was used to determine individualized optimal resistance conditions. The other three visits were for performance of one of three Wingate tests: a flying start with 0.834 N x kg(-1) [85 g x kg(-1) body weight (BW)] resistance (FLY-0.8); a stationary start with 0.834 N x kg(-1) BW resistance (ST-0.8), or a stationary start with optimal resistance (ST-OPT). FLY-0.8 gave a lower (P
PubMed ID
12560957 View in PubMed
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Association between 25-hydroxy vitamin D levels, physical activity, muscle strength and fractures in the prospective population-based OPRA Study of Elderly Women.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature175928
Source
Osteoporos Int. 2005 Nov;16(11):1425-31
Publication Type
Article
Date
Nov-2005
Author
P. Gerdhem
K A M Ringsberg
K J Obrant
K. Akesson
Author Affiliation
Department of Orthopedics, Malmö University Hospital, Lund University, Malmö, Sweden. paul.gerdhem@skane.se
Source
Osteoporos Int. 2005 Nov;16(11):1425-31
Date
Nov-2005
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Accidental Falls
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Bone Density
Calcifediol - blood
Cohort Studies
Female
Fractures, Bone - epidemiology
Humans
Motor Activity
Muscle, Skeletal - physiology
Predictive value of tests
Risk factors
Sweden - epidemiology
Vitamin D - analogs & derivatives - blood
Abstract
Vitamin D supplements have been used to prevent fractures. The effect may be mediated through increased bone mass, but also through reduced falling propensity. The aim of this study was to evaluate the association between 25-hydroxy vitamin D levels (25OHD), fall-associated variables (including tests of functional performance), and fracture in ambulatory women. At baseline 25OHD was measured in 986 women. Fall-associated variables were investigated at baseline. Fractures were recorded during a 3-year follow-up. Four percent of the women had 25OHD levels below 20 ng/ml (50 nmol/l), and 26% had 25OHD levels below 30 ng/ml (75 nmol/l). 25OHD correlated with gait speed (r =0.17, P
PubMed ID
15744449 View in PubMed
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The association between physical activity and forearm bone mineral density in healthy premenopausal women.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature49682
Source
J Womens Health (Larchmt). 2004 Apr;13(3):301-13
Publication Type
Article
Date
Apr-2004
Author
Liv Berit Augestad
Berit Schei
Siri Forsmo
Arnulf Langhammer
W Dana Flanders
Author Affiliation
Program for Sport Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences and Technology Management, Norwegian University of Science and Technology (NTNU), Trondheim, Norway. liv.berit.augestad@svt.ntnu.no
Source
J Womens Health (Larchmt). 2004 Apr;13(3):301-13
Date
Apr-2004
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Analysis of Variance
Bone Density
Chi-Square Distribution
Comparative Study
Exercise - physiology
Female
Forearm
Humans
Motor Activity
Muscle, Skeletal - physiology
Norway - epidemiology
Osteoporosis, Postmenopausal - epidemiology - physiopathology - prevention & control
Physical Fitness
Premenopause
Questionnaires
Radius - physiology
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Risk factors
Time Factors
Abstract
PURPOSE: To analyze the association between recreational and occupational physical activity and forearm bone mineral density (BMD) in healthy premenopausal women. METHODS: During 1984-1986, a population-based health survey (HUNT 1) was conducted among women and men aged >19 years in Nord-Trøndelag county in Norway. The second, follow-up survey (HUNT 2) was conducted during 1995-1997. The subjects in this study consist of healthy premenopausal women (n = 1396)
PubMed ID
15130259 View in PubMed
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Association of body size and muscle strength with incidence of coronary heart disease and cerebrovascular diseases: a population-based cohort study of one million Swedish men.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature91095
Source
Int J Epidemiol. 2009 Feb;38(1):110-8
Publication Type
Article
Date
Feb-2009
Author
Silventoinen Karri
Magnusson Patrik K E
Tynelius Per
Batty G David
Rasmussen Finn
Author Affiliation
Department of Public Health, University of Helsinki, Finland.
Source
Int J Epidemiol. 2009 Feb;38(1):110-8
Date
Feb-2009
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Anthropometry
Body Size
Cerebrovascular Disorders - epidemiology - etiology
Coronary Disease - epidemiology - etiology
Educational Status
Epidemiologic Methods
Humans
Male
Muscle strength
Muscle, Skeletal - physiology
Obesity - complications - epidemiology
Social Class
Sweden - epidemiology
Thinness - complications - epidemiology
Young Adult
Abstract
BACKGROUND: Muscle strength and body size may be associated with coronary heart disease (CHD) and stroke risk. However, perhaps because of a low number of cases, existing evidence is inconsistent. METHODS: Height, weight, systolic (SBP) and diastolic blood pressure (DBP), elbow flexion, hand grip and knee extension strength were measured in young adulthood in 1 145 467 Swedish men born between 1951 and 1976. Information on own and parental social position was derived from censuses. During the register-based follow-up until the end of 2006, 12 323 CHD and 8865 stroke cases emerged, including 1431 intracerebral haemorrhage, 1316 subarachoid haemorrhage and 2944 intracerebral infarction cases. Hazard ratios (HR) per 1 SD in the exposures of interest were computed using Cox proportional hazard model. RESULTS: Body mass index (BMI, kg/m(2)) showed increased risk with CHD and intracerebral infarction, whereas for intracerebral and subarachoid haemorrhage both under- and overweight was associated with increased risk. Height was inversely associated with CHD and all types of stroke. After adjustment for height, BMI, SBP, DBP and social position, all strength indicators were inversely associated with disease risk. For CHD and intracerebral infarction, grip strength showed the strongest association (HR = 0.89 and 0.91, respectively) whereas for intracerebral and subarachoid haemorrhage, knee extension strength was the best predictor (HR = 0.88 and 0.92, respectively). CONCLUSION: Body size and muscle strength in young adulthood are important predictors of risk of CHD and stroke in later life. In addition to adiposity, underweight needs attention since it may predispose to cerebrovascular complications.
PubMed ID
19033357 View in PubMed
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127 records – page 1 of 13.