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An assessment of mumps vaccine effectiveness by dose during an outbreak in Canada.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature134463
Source
CMAJ. 2011 Jun 14;183(9):1014-20
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-14-2011
Author
Shelley L Deeks
Gillian H Lim
Mary Anne Simpson
Louise Gagné
Jonathan Gubbay
Erik Kristjanson
Cecilia Fung
Natasha S Crowcroft
Author Affiliation
Ontario Agency for Health Protection and Promotion, Toronto, Ontario. shelley.deeks@oahpp.ca
Source
CMAJ. 2011 Jun 14;183(9):1014-20
Date
Jun-14-2011
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Aged
Antibodies, Viral - blood
Child
DNA, Viral
Disease Outbreaks
Female
Humans
Immunization Schedule
Immunoglobulin G - blood
Male
Measles-Mumps-Rubella Vaccine - administration & dosage - immunology
Middle Aged
Mumps - epidemiology - prevention & control
Mumps Vaccine - immunology
Mumps virus - immunology - isolation & purification
Ontario - epidemiology
Treatment Outcome
Vaccination
Young Adult
Abstract
This investigation was done to assess vaccine effectiveness of one and two doses of the measles, mumps and rubella (MMR) vaccine during an outbreak of mumps in Ontario. The level of coverage required to reach herd immunity and interrupt community transmission of mumps was also estimated.
Information on confirmed cases of mumps was retrieved from Ontario's integrated Public Health Information System. Cases that occurred between Sept. 1, 2009, and June 10, 2010, were included. Selected health units supplied coverage data from the Ontario Immunization Record Information System. Vaccine effectiveness by dose was calculated using the screening method. The basic reproductive number (R(0)) represents the average number of new infections per case in a fully susceptible population, and R(0) values of between 4 and 10 were considered for varying levels of vaccine effectiveness.
A total of 134 confirmed cases of mumps were identified. Information on receipt of MMR vaccine was available for 114 (85.1%) cases, of whom 63 (55.3%) reported having received only one dose of vaccine; 32 (28.1%) reported having received two doses. Vaccine effectiveness of one dose of the MMR vaccine ranged from 49.2% to 81.6%, whereas vaccine effectiveness of two doses ranged from 66.3% to 88.0%. If we assume vaccine effectiveness of 85% for two doses of the vaccine, vaccine coverage of 88.2% and 98.0% would be needed to interrupt community transmission of mumps if the corresponding reproductive values were four and six.
Our estimates of vaccine effectiveness of one and two doses of mumps-containing vaccine were consistent with the estimates that have been reported in other outbreaks. Outbreaks occurring in Ontario and elsewhere serve as a warning against complacency over vaccination programs.
Notes
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PubMed ID
21576295 View in PubMed
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Cellular immunity to mumps virus in young adults 21 years after measles-mumps-rubella vaccination.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature161852
Source
J Infect Dis. 2007 Sep 15;196(6):861-7
Publication Type
Article
Date
Sep-15-2007
Author
Sari Jokinen
Pamela Osterlund
Ilkka Julkunen
Irja Davidkin
Author Affiliation
Department of Viral Diseases and Immunology, National Public Health Institute, Helsinki, Finland. sari.jokinen@ktl.fi
Source
J Infect Dis. 2007 Sep 15;196(6):861-7
Date
Sep-15-2007
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Antibodies, Viral - blood
Antigens, Viral - immunology
Female
Finland
Follow-Up Studies
Humans
Immunity, Cellular
Immunoglobulin G - blood
Interferon-gamma - biosynthesis
Interleukin-10 - biosynthesis
Lymphocyte Activation
Lymphocytes - immunology
Male
Measles-Mumps-Rubella Vaccine - immunology
Mumps virus - immunology
Abstract
Measles-mumps-rubella (MMR) vaccination has decreased the incidence of measles, mumps, and rubella virus infections in several countries. However, the persistence of MMR vaccine-induced immunity in the absence of endemic infection has remained unknown.
The persistence of cellular and humoral immunity to mumps virus was studied in 50 individuals (group A) who had been vaccinated twice with MMR vaccine during early childhood and were followed up for 21 years after their first vaccination. Eleven individuals (group B) with naturally acquired immunity to mumps virus were studied for comparison.
Anti-mumps virus IgG antibodies were detectable (titer > or = 230) in 72% of the vaccinees. A mumps antigen-specific lymphoproliferative response (defined as a stimulatory index [SI] > or = 3) was observed in 98% of group A subjects (mean+/-SD SI, 26+/-30 [range, 0.5-252]) and in 100% of group B subjects (mean+/-SD SI, 22+/-27 [range, 5-123]). Significant mumps antigen-specific interferon- gamma production was detected in 73% of subjects in both groups A and B, and interleukin-10 production was detected in 40% and 36% of group A and B subjects, respectively.
All presently seronegative vaccinees (n=14) had mumps antigen-specific lymphoproliferative responses, and only 1 of the seropositive vaccinees (n=36) was devoid of detectable cellular immunity. The results suggest a very long persistence of vaccine-induced anti-mumps virus cellular immunity.
PubMed ID
17703416 View in PubMed
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[Changes in measles, mumps and rubella (MMR) immunity until the year of 2002 after the introduction of MMR vaccination]

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature36645
Source
Ugeskr Laeger. 1992 Jul 13;154(29):2014-8
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jul-13-1992
Author
T. Rønne
H. Trier
Author Affiliation
Epidemiologisk afdeling, Statens Seruminstitut, København.
Source
Ugeskr Laeger. 1992 Jul 13;154(29):2014-8
Date
Jul-13-1992
Language
Danish
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Antibodies, Viral - analysis - biosynthesis
Child
Child, Preschool
Denmark
English Abstract
Humans
Immunization, Secondary
Measles Vaccine - administration & dosage - adverse effects - immunology
Measles virus - immunology
Models, Biological
Mumps Vaccine - administration & dosage - adverse effects - immunology
Mumps virus - immunology
Prognosis
Rubella Vaccine - administration & dosage - adverse effects - immunology
Rubella virus - immunology
Abstract
In order to decide whether vaccination for measles, mumps and rubella should be introduced at the age of five years, calculations of the immunities in various age groups were performed until the year 2002 with and without vaccination at the age of five years. These calculations are based on the knowledge of immunity in the various age groups before the MMR vaccination programme was instituted in 1987 and knowledge of the compliance with vaccination obtained to date. Future predictions reveal that it is of decisive significance that compliance with vaccination among 12-year-olds is increased as rapidly as possible to 0.7 and to 0.8 in the subsequent year, if the level of immunity present prior to institution of the vaccination programme is to be maintained. The second vaccination given at a shorter interval after the first would prevent about 150 cases of illness in all per annum among 6-12 years-old. However, this should not be introduced at the expense of vaccination at the age of 12 years, which should be continued for at least 10-15 years yet. Possible abandoning of vaccination at the age of 12 years 10-15 years hence presupposes that adequate numbers of the children have been vaccinated twice at an early age and that it is sufficiently certain that secondary failure of vaccination does not occur to any significant extent.
PubMed ID
1509567 View in PubMed
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The clinical picture of juvenile parotitis in a prospective setup.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature121272
Source
Acta Paediatr. 2013 Feb;102(2):177-81
Publication Type
Article
Date
Feb-2013
Author
Riitta Saarinen
Kaija-Leena Kolho
Irja Davidkin
Anne Pitkäranta
Author Affiliation
Department of Otorhinolaryngology and Head and Neck Surgery, Helsinki University, Helsinki, Finland. riitta.t.saarinen@hus.fi
Source
Acta Paediatr. 2013 Feb;102(2):177-81
Date
Feb-2013
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Acute Disease
Adolescent
Amylases - blood
Antibodies, Viral - blood
Biological Markers - blood
Child
Child, Preschool
Female
Finland - epidemiology
Follow-Up Studies
Health Surveys
Humans
Leukocyte Count
Male
Mumps virus - immunology
Parotitis - blood - diagnosis - epidemiology - therapy
Prospective Studies
Questionnaires
Abstract
To characterize the features of juvenile parotitis in a prospective setup and epidemiology.
All children with parotitis admitted to Helsinki University Central Hospital 2005-2010 were recruited. Clinical characteristics, given treatment, outcome, blood leukocyte count, C-reactive protein, serum amylase and trypsinogen, SPINK-1 genotype and mumps antibodies were recorded. To map the epidemiology, a questionnaire was sent to 1000 randomly selected 13-year-old children.
The prospective study included 41 children (aged = 17) with acute parotitis, all in good general condition. Serum amylase, but not trypsinogen, was elevated in majority of the cases (79%) and C-reactive protein in 68%. Eleven (27%) children had an elevated blood leukocyte count. None had acute mumps. Most children recovered well, 51% being treated symptomatically only. Seven children were treated on ward. Seventeen (46%) children had recurrent symptoms. One child (2.4%) had SPINK P55S mutation. According to the epidemiological questionnaire, 1.1% of the respondents (8/728, response rate 73%) reported a verified episode(s) of parotitis.
Juvenile parotitis has a frequency close to 1%. In the majority, the general condition is good during the episode. Serum amylase serves as an additional marker for the disease. Parotitis has a tendency to recur in almost half of the cases.
PubMed ID
22924783 View in PubMed
Less detail

[Comparative evaluation of Leningrad-3 mumps vaccine virus neurovirulence in a neonatal rat model].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature131526
Source
Vopr Virusol. 2011 Jul-Aug;56(4):30-3
Publication Type
Article
Author
G M Ignat'ev
E V Otrashevskaia
S A Rubin
Source
Vopr Virusol. 2011 Jul-Aug;56(4):30-3
Language
Russian
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Animals
Brain - pathology - virology
Cercopithecus aethiops
Humans
Models, Animal
Mumps - immunology - virology
Mumps Vaccine - administration & dosage - adverse effects - immunology
Mumps virus - immunology - pathogenicity
Rats
Reproducibility of Results
Russia
Virology - methods
Virulence - immunology
Virus Replication - immunology
Abstract
The neurovirulence and replication potential of several mumps virus strains, including Leningrad-3 mumps vaccine virus (FSUE SIC "Microgen", Russia) and wild type strains isolated in the Novosibirsk Region (Russia), were assessed in rat tests. The mean neurovirulence scores of the Leningrad-3 virus (
PubMed ID
21899067 View in PubMed
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Decline of mumps antibodies in type 1 (insulin-dependent) diabetic children and a plateau in the rising incidence of type 1 diabetes after introduction of the mumps-measles-rubella vaccine in Finland. Childhood Diabetes in Finland Study Group.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature219681
Source
Diabetologia. 1993 Dec;36(12):1303-8
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-1993
Author
H. Hyöty
M. Hiltunen
A. Reunanen
P. Leinikki
T. Vesikari
R. Lounamaa
J. Tuomilehto
H K Akerblom
Author Affiliation
Department of Biomedical Sciences, University of Tampere, Finland.
Source
Diabetologia. 1993 Dec;36(12):1303-8
Date
Dec-1993
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Antibodies, Viral - blood
Case-Control Studies
Child
Child, Preschool
Diabetes Mellitus, Type 1 - epidemiology - immunology
Drug Combinations
Female
Finland - epidemiology
Humans
Immunoglobulin A - blood
Incidence
Infant
Male
Measles Vaccine - adverse effects
Measles-Mumps-Rubella Vaccine
Mumps Vaccine - adverse effects
Mumps virus - immunology
Rubella Vaccine - adverse effects
Sex Factors
Abstract
A nationwide mumps-measles-rubella vaccination was introduced in 1982 in Finland to children aged 1.5 to 6 years and since then mumps has virtually disappeared in the country. We investigated whether this rapid epidemiological change had any impact on antibody activity against mumps virus in Type 1 (insulin-dependent) diabetic children or on the incidence of Type 1 diabetes in Finland. Two case-control series were collected before (series I and II) and three series after (series III-V) the introduction of the vaccination. IgA class mumps antibody levels were significantly higher in Type 1 diabetic children than in matched control children in the first two but not in the three later series. IgG class antibody levels were similar in patients and control subjects in the first two series but significantly lower in patients than in control subjects in the three later series. The overall incidence of Type 1 diabetes in 0-14-year-old children increased until 1987 but remained about the same during 1988-1990. In 5-9-year-old children no further increase in Type 1 diabetes was seen since 1985, whereas in 0-4-year-old children the incidence continued to rise until 1990. The results suggest that the elimination of natural mumps by mumps-measles-rubella vaccination may have decreased the risk for Type 1 diabetes in Finland; a possible causal relationship is substantiated by the observed concomitant decrease in mumps antibody levels in diabetic children. However, further studies are required to determine if the vaccine virus, like natural mumps, could trigger the clinical onset of Type 1 diabetes in young children.
PubMed ID
8307260 View in PubMed
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Difficulty with mumps diagnosis: what is the contribution of mumps mimickers?

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature147961
Source
J Clin Virol. 2009 Dec;46(4):381-3
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-2009
Author
Todd F Hatchette
James B Mahony
Sylvia Chong
Jason J LeBlanc
Author Affiliation
Division of Microbiology, Department of Pathology and Laboratory Medicine, Capital District Health Authority, Nova Scotia, Canada. todd.hatchette@cdha.nshealth.ca
Source
J Clin Virol. 2009 Dec;46(4):381-3
Date
Dec-2009
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Aged
Child
Disease Outbreaks
Female
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Mumps - diagnosis - epidemiology - virology
Mumps virus - immunology - isolation & purification
Nova Scotia - epidemiology
Parotitis - diagnosis - epidemiology - virology
Young Adult
Abstract
Mumps is a vaccine preventable disease that typically presents with unilateral or bilateral parotitis. In February 2007, mumps re-emerged in university students in Nova Scotia. Despite highly sensitive methods for mumps virus detection, only 14% (298/2082) of cases during the peak of the outbreak were laboratory confirmed.
Due to the low positivity rate, this study investigated whether infection with other viral pathogens caused mumps-like presentations during the outbreak.
148 buccal specimens from patients who presented with unilateral or bilateral parotitis but had negative laboratory tests for mumps virus were tested for Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) and cytomegalovirus (CMV) by quantitative PCR and 21 different viral markers using the Luminex xTAG Respiratory Virus Panel (RVP). Companion sera to each buccal specimen were available for EBV and CMV serology to differentiate acute infection from reactivation.
No correlation was observed since viral pathogens were detected in both the parotitis and non-parotitis groups.
Although there was co-circulation of other viral pathogens during the mumps outbreak, no difference was observed in the prevalence between patients who presented with or without parotitis. The low positivity rate for specimens submitted for mumps diagnostics was likely the result of increased Public Health messaging and physician inexperience in recognizing mumps infection, suggesting the clinical acumen for mumps diagnosis based solely on clinical presentation is low.
PubMed ID
19828368 View in PubMed
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The HLA-DR phenotype modulates the humoral immune response to enterovirus antigens.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature30860
Source
Diabetologia. 2003 Aug;46(8):1100-5
Publication Type
Article
Date
Aug-2003
Author
K. Sadeharju
M. Knip
M. Hiltunen
H K Akerblom
H. Hyöty
Author Affiliation
Department of Virology, Medical School, University of Tampere, PO Box 33014, Tampere, Finland.
Source
Diabetologia. 2003 Aug;46(8):1100-5
Date
Aug-2003
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Antibody formation
Antigens, Viral - blood - immunology
Child
Diabetes Mellitus, Type 1 - immunology
Enterovirus - immunology
Enterovirus Infections - immunology
Female
Genetic Predisposition to Disease - genetics
HLA-DR Antigens - genetics
Heterozygote
Homozygote
Humans
Immunoglobulin A - blood
Immunoglobulin G - blood
Male
Mumps virus - immunology
Phenotype
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Siblings
Sweden
Abstract
AIMS/HYPOTHESIS. Enterovirus infections are among the environmental risk factors potentially contributing to the pathogenesis of Type 1 diabetes. The aim of this study was to evaluate virus-host interaction by analysing the enterovirus antibody levels in subjects carrying different HLA-DR alleles associated with either increased or decreased risk of Type 1 diabetes. METHODS. Antibodies against coxsackievirus B4 were measured to study immune responses induced by natural enterovirus infections and against poliovirus 1 to study immune responses induced by immunisation by enterovirus antigens (vaccine). Antibodies against the mumps virus were measured as a control. Study subjects included siblings of children with Type 1 diabetes taking part in the Childhood Diabetes in Finland (DiMe) Study and carrying either HLA-DR risk (DR3 and/or DR4) or protective (DR2) alleles. RESULTS. Children with either the HLA-DR3 or HLA-DR4 allele and those with both these risk alleles had higher Coxsackie B4 antibody levels than children carrying the HLA-DR2 allele ( p=0.01, p=0.01 and p=0.008, respectively). High responders (IgG levels higher than 75 percent) were also more frequent among genetically susceptible children compared to children with the protective DR2 allele (27% vs 12%) ( p
PubMed ID
12845430 View in PubMed
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28 records – page 1 of 3.