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Activities of daily living and social activities in people with multiple sclerosis in Stockholm County.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature81185
Source
Clin Rehabil. 2006 Jun;20(6):543-51
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-2006
Author
Einarsson U.
Gottberg K.
Fredrikson S.
von Koch L.
Holmqvist L Widén
Author Affiliation
Division of Physiotherapy, Neurotec Department, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden. ulrika.einarsson@karolinska.se
Source
Clin Rehabil. 2006 Jun;20(6):543-51
Date
Jun-2006
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Activities of Daily Living
Cross-Sectional Studies
Female
Humans
Leisure Activities
Life Style
Male
Middle Aged
Multiple Sclerosis - rehabilitation
Sweden
Abstract
OBJECTIVE: To describe independence in personal and instrumental activities of daily living (ADL), and frequency of social/lifestyle activities in a population-based sample of people with multiple sclerosis in Stockholm. DESIGN: Population-based survey. SETTING: Data collection in home environment. SUBJECTS: One hundred and sixty-six people with multiple sclerosis. INTERVENTIONS: Data were collected using measurements and structured interviews. MAIN MEASURES: Independence in ADL was assessed by the Barthel Index; independence in personal and instrumental ADL by the Katz Extended ADL Index; and frequency of social/lifestyle activities by the Frenchay Activities Index. RESULTS: The mean age was 51 +/- 12 years in the included 166 people with multiple sclerosis, of whom 71% (n = 118) were women. Fifty-two per cent (n = 85) were independent in personal ADL, 30% (n = 50) in instrumental ADL, and 35% (n = 57) had normal frequency of social/lifestyle activities. Most frequently affected ADL items were cleaning indoors and outdoors transportation (62%, n = 102) and the social/lifestyle items of household maintenance (59%, n = 97), walking outside (59%, n = 97), heavy housework (61%, n = 100), and gardening (68%, n = 112). CONCLUSIONS: ADL and social/lifestyle activities were affected in two-thirds of people with multiple sclerosis in Stockholm. The most affected items were items that could be classified as mobility-related and physically demanding, underlining the importance of developing and using evidence-based exercise treatments and rehabilitation to increase independence in people with multiple sclerosis in Stockholm.
PubMed ID
16892936 View in PubMed
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Chronic disease self-management for individuals with stroke, multiple sclerosis and spinal cord injury.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature140303
Source
Disabil Rehabil. 2011;33(13-14):1136-46
Publication Type
Article
Date
2011
Author
Robert C Hirsche
Beverly Williams
Allyson Jones
Patricia Manns
Author Affiliation
Faculty of Rehabilitation Medicine, University of Alberta, Edmonton, Alberta, Canada.
Source
Disabil Rehabil. 2011;33(13-14):1136-46
Date
2011
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Aged
Alberta
Chronic Disease - rehabilitation
Humans
Middle Aged
Multiple Sclerosis - rehabilitation
Program Evaluation
Self Care
Self Efficacy
Spinal Cord Injuries - rehabilitation
Stroke - rehabilitation
Abstract
The purpose of this study was to explore the experience of people with neurological conditions who take the chronic disease self-management (CDSM) programme. The CDSM programme is used to teach skills to manage chronic conditions, and prevent secondary conditions. Few studies have explored the use of the CDSM programme with people with neurological conditions, in spite of the long standing and sometimes unpredictable nature of those conditions.
This qualitative study explored the experience of people with stroke, multiple sclerosis (MS) and spinal cord injury (SCI) who participated in the CDSM programme. We completed individual interviews using a semi-structured interview guide with 22 individuals with stroke, MS and SCI.
Five categories emerged from the interview discussions including: (1) pre-programme influences; (2) group; (3) factors affecting learning opportunities; (4) workshop content and (5) outcomes.
The results of this study provide insights regarding the optimal way to present the CDSM programme to people with neurological conditions.
PubMed ID
20919875 View in PubMed
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Concordance in goal setting between patients with multiple sclerosis and their rehabilitation team.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature167349
Source
Am J Phys Med Rehabil. 2006 Oct;85(10):807-13
Publication Type
Article
Date
Oct-2006
Author
Lynn F Bloom
Nathalie M Lapierre
Keith G Wilson
Dorothyann Curran
Daniel A DeForge
Jeff Blackmer
Author Affiliation
The Rehabilitation Centre, Ottawa, Canada.
Source
Am J Phys Med Rehabil. 2006 Oct;85(10):807-13
Date
Oct-2006
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Activities of Daily Living
Adult
Communication
Cooperative Behavior
Disability Evaluation
Female
Goals
Humans
Interviews as Topic
Male
Middle Aged
Multiple Sclerosis - rehabilitation
Ontario
Patient Care Planning
Patient care team
Professional-Patient Relations
Prospective Studies
Rehabilitation Centers
Abstract
To determine the concordance between patients with multiple sclerosis and their clinical team members on the identification of goals for an inpatient rehabilitation stay.
Prospective cohort study of patients admitted for rehabilitation in an adult inpatient neurospinal unit at a Rehabilitation Centre in Ottawa, Canada. Twenty-seven patients (11 men and 16 women, mean age of 45.3 yrs) with either a laboratory or a clinically supported diagnosis of multiple sclerosis. Patients rated 55 goals from a preexisting list, indicating the importance of each goal to be addressed during the inpatient stay. The goals fell into five broad domains of health/medical issues, daily activities, mobility, community life, and personal well-being. Patients also identified their five most important individual goals. In a separate session, the clinical team also rated the 55 goals in relation to each patient and identified an independent list of the five most important rehabilitation goals. Main outcome measures included concordance between patient and team ratings in the identification of goals, ratings of the likelihood of success of achieving each goal, and ratings of the amount of change required to realize a minimal clinically important difference.
The patients and the team agreed on an average of 1.7 of the patient's five top-rated goals. Compared with the team, patients gave higher importance ratings to goals within the health/medical, mobility, and daily activities domains. They also considered that a greater average improvement would be required to achieve a meaningful benefit, and they gave higher ratings of the likelihood of success in achieving their selected goals.
Patients with multiple sclerosis and clinical team members do not necessarily agree on specific goals for a rehabilitation stay. Patients may also have greater expectations than clinicians with respect to the amount of improvement and the likelihood of achieving their goals.
PubMed ID
16998427 View in PubMed
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The cooling-suit: a study of ten multiple sclerosis patients' experiences in daily life.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature201926
Source
J Adv Nurs. 1999 Jun;29(6):1444-53
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-1999
Author
G. Flensner
C. Lindencrona
Author Affiliation
Department of Nursing Sciences, Vänersborg University College of Health Sciences, Sweden.
Source
J Adv Nurs. 1999 Jun;29(6):1444-53
Date
Jun-1999
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Activities of Daily Living
Adult
Environment, Controlled
Female
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Multiple Sclerosis - rehabilitation
Protective Clothing
Self Care
Self-Help Devices
Sweden
Abstract
Approximately 60%-80% of all multiple sclerosis (MS) patients are heat sensitive. The aim of this study was to gain information on the effects of an assistive device, the cooling-suit, on MS-patients' self-care ability and also practical implications. A single-case approach was adopted in a quasi- experimental before-and-after study. The cooling-suit was used in their own homes by 10 individuals with diagnosed MS in different stages from relapsing-remitting to chronic progressive. Data collection procedures were self-assessment through a structured assessment-instrument, an open-ended interview before and after the intervention and a diary written during one week. The selected instrument, the MS Self-Care ADL Scale, has been developed for persons with MS and was translated into Swedish. The results showed increased self-care ability during and after use of the cooling-suit. However, different aspects of daily life activities were improved and to a varying extent. It is concluded that the study participants were supported and empowered in different activities of daily life such as walking and transfer and reduced voiding problems by using the cooling-suit. Some difficulties in handling the cooling-suit were also reported.
Notes
Erratum In: J Adv Nurs 1999 Sep;30(3):775
PubMed ID
10354240 View in PubMed
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[Effective rehabilitation of hospitalized patients with multiple sclerosis].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature283112
Source
Ugeskr Laeger. 2015 Jul 06;177(28)
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jul-06-2015
Author
Finn Boesen
Michael Nørgaard
Brita Løvendahl
Source
Ugeskr Laeger. 2015 Jul 06;177(28)
Date
Jul-06-2015
Language
Danish
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Combined Modality Therapy
Denmark
Hospitalization
Humans
Multiple Sclerosis - rehabilitation
Treatment Outcome
Abstract
Globally, the number of people suffering from multiple sclerosis (MS) is more than two million, and MS is characterized by increasing symptom development over time. The socio-economic costs are enormous. Therefore, effective management of MS is of great importance. Multidisciplinary rehabilitation (MR) seeks to prevent and stop loss of function and trains the patients to deal with symptoms and challenges that will arise in the future. Because there is a need for high-quality evidence of the effectiveness of MR, the MS hospitals in Denmark have initiated the largest study of its kind on MR.
PubMed ID
26239857 View in PubMed
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Effects of aerobic and strength exercise on motor fatigue in men and women with multiple sclerosis: a randomized controlled trial.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature177140
Source
Clin Rehabil. 2004 Nov;18(7):737-46
Publication Type
Article
Date
Nov-2004
Author
Jukka Surakka
Anders Romberg
Juhani Ruutiainen
Sirkka Aunola
Arja Virtanen
Sirkka-Liisa Karppi
Kari Mäentaka
Author Affiliation
National Public Health Institute, Department of Health and Functional Capacity, Turku, Finland. jukka.surakka@ktl.fi
Source
Clin Rehabil. 2004 Nov;18(7):737-46
Date
Nov-2004
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Disability Evaluation
Exercise Therapy
Female
Finland
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Multiple Sclerosis - rehabilitation
Muscle Fatigue
Sex Distribution
Abstract
To investigate the effects of aerobic and strength exercise on motor fatigue of knee flexor and extensor muscles in subjects with multiple sclerosis (MS).
A randomized controlled trial.
At Masku Neurological Rehabilitation Centre, Masku, and the Social Insurance Institution, Research Department, Turku, Finland.
Ninety-five MS patients with mild to moderate disability were randomized into exercise group (n =47) and a control group (n =48).
Participants in the exercise group attended in a supervised exercise period of three weeks, which was followed by a home exercise programme lasting for 23 weeks. Patients in the control group continued with their normal living.
Motor fatigue of knee flexor and extensor muscles was measured during a static 30-s maximal sustained muscle contraction. The decline in force (Nm) during the 30 s was recorded, and a fatigue index (FI) was calculated. Subjective fatigue was measured by using the Fatigue Severity Scale (FSS). The Ambulatory Fatigue Index (AFI) was calculated on the basis of a 500-m walking test. Assessment took place at baseline, at the third week (not for the control group) and at the 26th week. All outcome variables were analysed, men and women together, and some interesting contrasts were analysed by gender.
Associations were observed with changes in extension FI and Expanded Disability Status Scale (EDSS) score and mean extension torque (Nm), but not with changes in FI and aerobic or strength exercise activity, mean AFI, mean FSS or in mean knee flexion torque. AFI was decreased in all subject groups (p =0.007). Motor fatigue was reduced in knee flexion (p=0.0014) and extension (ns) among female but not in male exercisers after six months of exercise. The exercise activity of women was 25% higher than that of the men.
Six months of exercise reduced motor fatigue in women, but not in men.
PubMed ID
15573829 View in PubMed
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Identifying physical activity information needs and preferred methods of delivery of people with multiple sclerosis.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature113115
Source
Disabil Rehabil. 2013;35(24):2056-63
Publication Type
Article
Date
2013
Author
Shane N Sweet
Marie-Josée Perrier
Christine Podzyhun
Amy E Latimer-Cheung
Author Affiliation
School of Kinesiology and Health Studies, Queen's University , Kingston, Ontario , Canada.
Source
Disabil Rehabil. 2013;35(24):2056-63
Date
2013
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Allied Health Personnel - statistics & numerical data
Canada
Exercise
Female
Focus Groups
Health Knowledge, Attitudes, Practice
Humans
Information Seeking Behavior
Internet
Interviews as Topic
Male
Middle Aged
Models, Theoretical
Multiple Sclerosis - rehabilitation
Needs Assessment - organization & administration
Patient Education as Topic - methods
Physician's Role
Population Surveillance - methods
Societies, Medical
Abstract
The purpose of this study was to examine the preferred sources and methods for acquiring physical activity information of individuals with multiple sclerosis (MS) using the Comprehensive Model of Information Seeking. A secondary objective was to explore the barriers and facilitators to physical activity information seeking.
Twenty-one participants diagnosed with MS participated in focus groups or telephone interviews.
A direct content analysis of the transcripts revealed that individuals appeared to generally prefer receiving physical activity information during period of relapse and remission. Participants also had positive beliefs toward physical activity and a clear preference for a time when physical activity messages would be relevant. Receiving physical activity information from credible sources such as the MS Society of Canada, healthcare professionals and peers with MS was also deemed important. The Internet was a preferred source to receive information due to its accessibility, but it often was considered to lack credibility. The lack of physical activity information specific to MS is the greatest barrier for individuals with MS to learn about physical activity.
Healthcare professionals, National MS Societies, and peers should work together to deliver specific and relevant physical activity messages the MS population.
People with MS want more physical activity information from credible sources. Multiple vehicles of physical activity information delivery (i.e. healthcare providers, peers, MS Society) should be utilized. Physical activity information should be tailored to the individual with MS.
PubMed ID
23763468 View in PubMed
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Performance of the SF-36, SF-12, and RAND-36 summary scales in a multiple sclerosis population.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature72088
Source
Med Care. 2000 Oct;38(10):1022-8
Publication Type
Article
Date
Oct-2000
Author
M W Nortvedt
T. Riise
K M Myhr
H I Nyland
Author Affiliation
Department of Public Health and Primary Health Care, University of Bergen, Norway. monica.nortvedt@hib.no
Source
Med Care. 2000 Oct;38(10):1022-8
Date
Oct-2000
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Activities of Daily Living
Cross-Sectional Studies
Disability Evaluation
Female
Health Status Indicators
Humans
Male
Mental health
Middle Aged
Multiple Sclerosis - rehabilitation
Norway
Outcome Assessment (Health Care) - methods
Quality of Life
Reproducibility of Results
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Abstract
BACKGROUND: Multiple sclerosis (MS) patients accumulate both physical and mental health problems along with disease progression. Valid and sensitive outcome measures are important to measure disease effects and the effect of treatment. OBJECTIVE: The objective of this study was to test the performance of the physical and mental summary scales of SF-36, SF-12, and RAND-36. METHODS: The scales were evaluated by comparing the scores of a cohort of 194 MS patients with general population data and using the Expanded Disability Status Scale (EDSS) and the Incapacity Status Scale-mental as criterion variables for physical functioning and mental health. RESULTS: All 3 physical summary scales were markedly reduced and correlated highly with the EDSS. The SF-36 mental summary score was only slightly reduced among MS patients (0.2 SD) compared with the general population, despite significantly reduced scores on all 4 health scales being most related to mental health and despite a high prevalence of mental health problems. This results from the poor physical functioning (mean scale score, 2.3 SD below the general population) and the orthogonal factor rotation used to derive independent measures of physical and mental health. Similar results were found for the SF-12. The nonorthogonal RAND-36 physical and mental summary scores were both markedly reduced. This is more compatible with the disease progression in MS and the results of the other measures of physical and mental health used in the study. CONCLUSIONS: The SF-36 and SF-12 mental health summary scales appear to overestimate mental health in people with MS.
PubMed ID
11021675 View in PubMed
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17 records – page 1 of 2.