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A case-control study of the association between socio-demographic, lifestyle and medical history factors and multiple sclerosis.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature190503
Source
Can J Public Health. 2001 Jul-Aug;92(4):281-5
Publication Type
Article
Author
P. Ghadirian
B. Dadgostar
R. Azani
P. Maisonneuve
Author Affiliation
Centre hospitalier de l'Université de Montréal-Hôtel-Dieu, Department of Nutrition, Faculty of Medicine, University of Montreal, Research Centre, Sainte Justine Hospital, Montreal, QC. parviz.ghadirian@umontreal.ca
Source
Can J Public Health. 2001 Jul-Aug;92(4):281-5
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Animals
Animals, Domestic
Case-Control Studies
Child
Child, Preschool
Family Health
Female
Humans
Infant
Life Style
Logistic Models
Male
Medical History Taking
Middle Aged
Multiple Sclerosis - complications - epidemiology
Quebec - epidemiology
Questionnaires
Risk assessment
Risk factors
Smoking - adverse effects
Socioeconomic Factors
Abstract
The etiology of multiple sclerosis (MS) remains poorly understood. Socio-demographic characteristics may play important roles in its development.
In a case-control study of MS, a total of 200 newly diagnosed MS patients and 202 frequency age- and sex-matched controls were studied.
A direct and significant association was observed between cigarette smoking and the risk of MS. Higher education seemed to reduce the risk of MS. Contact with cats was inversely associated with MS, particularly in males, whereas contact with caged birds increased the risk significantly, especially in females. A strong family aggregation of MS was observed among cases. A past history of trauma and eye problems appeared to pose a high risk of MS. Cases had a significant family history of eye problems, mumps, measles, rubella, cancer and auto-immune diseases.
If smoking and history of certain infectious diseases increase the risk of MS significantly, they could be modified and avoided, thereby reducing the likelihood of being afflicted by MS.
PubMed ID
11965642 View in PubMed
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The co-occurrence of endometriosis with multiple sclerosis, systemic lupus erythematosus and Sjogren syndrome.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature135501
Source
Hum Reprod. 2011 Jun;26(6):1555-9
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-2011
Author
Nete Munk Nielsen
Kristian T Jørgensen
Bo V Pedersen
Klaus Rostgaard
Morten Frisch
Author Affiliation
Department of Epidemiology Research, Statens Serum Institut, Copenhagen S, Denmark.
Source
Hum Reprod. 2011 Jun;26(6):1555-9
Date
Jun-2011
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Autoimmune Diseases - complications
Cohort Studies
Denmark - epidemiology
Endometriosis - complications - epidemiology
Female
Humans
Incidence
Lupus Erythematosus, Systemic - complications - epidemiology
Middle Aged
Multiple Sclerosis - complications - epidemiology
Sjogren's Syndrome - complications - epidemiology
Abstract
In a previous study, women with endometriosis were found to be at a 7-24-fold increased risk of multiple sclerosis (MS), systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) and Sjögren syndrome (SS). We examined these associations in a large population-based cohort study.
We followed 37 661 women registered with endometriosis in the Danish Hospital Discharge Register 1977-2007 for subsequent hospitalizations with MS, SLE or SS. As measures of relative risk, we used ratios of observed to expected incidence rates of first hospitalizations for MS, SLE and SS among women with endometriosis, i.e. standardized incidence ratios (SIR) with accompanying 95% confidence intervals (CIs).
During slightly more than 456 000 person-years of follow-up, we identified 130, 54 and 86 cases of MS, SLE and SS, respectively, yielding SIRs of 1.2 (95% CI 1.05-1.5) for MS, 1.6 (1.2-2.1) for SLE and 1.6 (1.3-2.0) for SS. In a supplementary analysis restricted to 9191 women with laparoscopy or laparotomy confirmed endometriosis, associations were unchanged for MS (SIR = 1.4; 1.04-1.9), but lost statistical significance for SLE (SIR = 1.1; 0.6-2.1) and SS (SIR = 1.4; 0.9-2.3).
Our national cohort-based findings do not support prior claims of markedly increased risks of MS, SLE and SS in women with endometriosis. However, whether women with endometriosis are truly at a modestly (20-60%) elevated risk of one or more of the studied autoimmune diseases must await clarification in future large-scale prospective studies.
PubMed ID
21471158 View in PubMed
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Disability and survival of multiple sclerosis in Saskatoon, Saskatchewan.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature145314
Source
Can J Neurol Sci. 2010 Jan;37(1):28-35
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jan-2010
Author
Walter J Hader
Author Affiliation
Department of Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation, University of Saskatchewan, Saskatoon City Hospital, Saskatoon, Saskatchewan, Canada.
Source
Can J Neurol Sci. 2010 Jan;37(1):28-35
Date
Jan-2010
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Age Factors
Disability Evaluation
Disabled Persons
Female
Humans
Longitudinal Studies
Male
Middle Aged
Multiple Sclerosis - complications - epidemiology - mortality
Population Surveillance
Prognosis
Retrospective Studies
Saskatchewan - epidemiology
Severity of Illness Index
Sex Factors
Survival Analysis
Abstract
A population-based prevalent group of 150 clinical definite patients ascertained on 1 January 1977, in Saskatoon, Saskatchewan, was followed for 30 years.
To outline the clinical characteristics, determine the levels of disability at 15, 25, 35, 40, and 45 years after onset, to estimate the survival after onset and life expectancy.
Clinical records were maintained, and the cohort reviewed each decade for 30 years. The disability levels according to the Kurtzke Extended Disability Status Scale were recorded and survival times were estimated. SPSS and Kaplan-Meier methods were used for analysis.
On prevalence day, 1 January 1977, there were 48 (32%) men and 102 (68%) women, with an average age of onset of 32.2 +/- 10 years and 28.4 +/- 8.6 years. The average duration of disease was 15.7 years. On 1 January 2007, 39 (26%) patients were living, 105 (70%) deceased, and 6 (4%) were missing The disability levels recorded in 1977 and 2007, at 15 and 45 years after onset, were mild (EDSS
PubMed ID
20169770 View in PubMed
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Elevated suicide risk among patients with multiple sclerosis in Sweden.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature68308
Source
Neuroepidemiology. 2003 Mar-Apr;22(2):146-52
Publication Type
Article
Author
S. Fredrikson
Q. Cheng
G-X Jiang
D. Wasserman
Author Affiliation
Division of Neurology, NEUROTEC, Karolinska Institutet, Huddinge University Hospital, Stockholm, Sweden. sten.frederikson@neurotec.ki.se
Source
Neuroepidemiology. 2003 Mar-Apr;22(2):146-52
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Age Factors
Aged
Cohort Studies
Female
Follow-Up Studies
Hospitalization - statistics & numerical data
Humans
Longitudinal Studies
Male
Middle Aged
Multiple Sclerosis - complications - epidemiology - psychology
Registries - statistics & numerical data
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Retrospective Studies
Risk assessment
Sex Factors
Suicide - psychology
Sweden - epidemiology
Time Factors
Abstract
Results from previous studies of suicide risk among patients with multiple sclerosis (MS) are inconsistent. This may be explained partly by differences in methodology and study populations. The purpose of our study was to investigate suicide risk among hospital patients with MS in Sweden. During the period 1969-1996, 12,834 cases were recorded in the Swedish Hospital Inpatient Register, with 77,377 hospital admissions, in which MS was a primary or secondary diagnosis at discharge. The mean follow-up time for the whole cohort was 9.9 (SD 7.3) years. When the data for these MS patients were linked to the Swedish Causes of Death Register for the same period, 5,052 (39.4%) were found to have died. Among the 5,052 deaths, suicide was an underlying cause of death in 90 cases (1.8%). The mean period between the initial admission date with an MS diagnosis at discharge and the date of death for the 90 MS suicide cases was 5.8 (SD 5.1) years. This was significantly shorter (p = 0.002) than the mean of 7.9 (SD 6.4) years for MS cases who died due to other causes. Suicide risk, calculated as the standardized mortality ratio (SMR), was significantly elevated (SMR = 2.3) among both male and female MS cases compared with the general population. Suicide risk was particularly high in the first year after initial admission with an MS diagnosis, and among younger male MS cases. The mean age at the time of suicide was 44.5 (SD 12.4) years, and 58% of the suicides were committed within 5 years after the first admission with an MS diagnosis. The crude suicide rate among MS patients during the study period was 71 per 100,000 person-years. The rate was significantly higher (p
Notes
Comment In: Neuroepidemiology. 2003 Mar-Apr;22(2):103-512656118
PubMed ID
12629281 View in PubMed
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How long can you keep working with benign multiple sclerosis?

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature141188
Source
J Neurol Neurosurg Psychiatry. 2011 Jan;82(1):78-82
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jan-2011
Author
Solveig B Glad
Harald Nyland
Jan Harald Aarseth
Trond Riise
Kjell-Morten Myhr
Author Affiliation
The Norwegian Multiple Sclerosis Competence Centre, Department of Neurology, Haukeland University Hospital, Bergen, Norway. solveig.bergliot.glad@helse-bergen.no
Source
J Neurol Neurosurg Psychiatry. 2011 Jan;82(1):78-82
Date
Jan-2011
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Activities of Daily Living
Age of Onset
Aged
Cognition Disorders - etiology - psychology
Cohort Studies
Depression - etiology - psychology
Disability Evaluation
Disease Progression
Employment - statistics & numerical data
Fatigue - etiology - psychology
Female
Humans
Insurance, Disability - statistics & numerical data
Male
Middle Aged
Multiple Sclerosis - complications - epidemiology - psychology
Neuropsychological Tests
Norway - epidemiology
Pain - etiology - psychology
Pensions
Prognosis
Socioeconomic Factors
Terminology as Topic
Abstract
To study employment in benign multiple sclerosis (MS), the frequency of employment was analysed and the effect of early clinical and demographic factors on time to disability pension was evaluated in a population based MS cohort. The frequency of depression, cognitive function, fatigue and pain between benign and non-benign MS patients was compared, and their impact on employment in benign MS was studied.
All 188 patients alive, including 60 benign patients with onset of MS during 1976-1986 in Hordaland County, Western Norway, were interviewed and clinically examined in 2003. The Expanded Disability Status Scale (EDSS), depression (Beck Depression Inventory), cognitive function, fatigue, pain, year of disability pension, employment and type of occupation were registered. Benign MS was defined as an EDSS score =3.0 at least 10 years after disease onset.
After a mean disease duration of 22.2 years, 32.4% of the cohort were still employed. A relapsing-remitting course, higher educational level and light physical work were significantly associated with longer time to disability pension in the general MS population. Thirty-nine (65.0%) benign MS patients were employed, independent of light or heavy physical work. Mild depressive symptoms were markedly associated with not being employed in benign MS (OR=7.3).
A relapsing-remitting course, higher educational level and light physical work significantly predicted longer time to disability pension in the total MS population. Among the benign MS patients, depressive symptoms, although mild, were strongly associated with not being employed.
PubMed ID
20802029 View in PubMed
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Increased prevalence of multiple sclerosis among COPD patients and their first-degree relatives: a population-based study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature93420
Source
Lung. 2008 May-Jun;186(3):173-8
Publication Type
Article
Author
Egesten Arne
Brandt Lena
Olsson Tomas
Granath Fredrik
Inghammar Malin
Löfdahl Claes-Göran
Ekbom Anders
Author Affiliation
Division of Respiratory Medicine and Allergology, Department of Clinical Sciences Lund, Lund University, University Hospital, BMC B14, Tornavägen 10, Lund SE-221 84, Sweden. Arne.Egesten@med.lu.se
Source
Lung. 2008 May-Jun;186(3):173-8
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Aged
Family
Female
Genetic Predisposition to Disease
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Multiple Sclerosis - complications - epidemiology - genetics
Population Surveillance
Prevalence
Pulmonary Disease, Chronic Obstructive - complications - epidemiology - genetics
Retrospective Studies
Risk factors
Sweden - epidemiology
Abstract
In both chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) and multiple sclerosis (MS), combinations of environmental and genetic factors are likely to increase the vulnerability to acquire disease. This study was undertaken to investigate any possible comorbidity of COPD and MS, thus indicating common inflammatory vulnerability. Individuals with a diagnosis of COPD (including chronic bronchitis and emphysema) during 1987-2002, according to the Swedish Inpatient and Cause of Death Registers, were identified (180,239 individuals). Thereafter, controls and first-degree relatives of both cases and controls were identified. Finally, all individuals were compared with the Inpatient Register to identify individuals discharged with a diagnosis of MS. In the COPD cohort, there was a more than twofold increased risk of MS compared with controls (HR 2.51; 95% CI 2.13-2.98). The risk of MS was even more pronounced among individuals discharged with a diagnosis of COPD before 60 years of age (HR 6.37; 95% CI 3.58-9.68). There was also an increased risk of MS among mothers (HR 2.24; 95% CI 1.04-4.61) and siblings (HR 1.50; 95% CI 1.08-2.08) of COPD patients. This study indicates that COPD and MS have an inflammatory vulnerability in common, at least in a subgroup of patients. These diseases may share inflammatory pathways, including predisposing variants of genes.
PubMed ID
18351419 View in PubMed
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Increased rate of treatment with antidepressants in patients with multiple sclerosis.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature87599
Source
Int Clin Psychopharmacol. 2008 Jan;23(1):54-9
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jan-2008
Author
Kessing Lars Vedel
Harhoff Mette
Andersen Per Kragh
Author Affiliation
Department of Psychiatry, Rigshospitalet, Denmark. lars.kessing@rh.dk
Source
Int Clin Psychopharmacol. 2008 Jan;23(1):54-9
Date
Jan-2008
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Age Factors
Aged
Antidepressive Agents - therapeutic use
Cohort Studies
Data Interpretation, Statistical
Databases, Factual
Denmark - epidemiology
Drug Utilization
Female
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Multiple Sclerosis - complications - epidemiology - psychology
Osteoarthritis - epidemiology
Registries
Sex Factors
Socioeconomic Factors
Abstract
The prevalence of depression and anxiety is increased in patients with multiple sclerosis, but it has not been investigated whether these conditions are treated in clinical practice. The objective of this study was to investigate whether the rate of treatment with antidepressants is increased in patients with multiple sclerosis compared with patients with other chronic illnesses and compared with the general population. By linkage of nationwide case registers, all patients were identified, who had received a main diagnosis of multiple sclerosis or osteoarthritis at first admission or during outpatient contact in the period 1995-2000 in Denmark. Rates of subsequent purchase of antidepressants for these patients were calculated. In total, 417 patients with a main diagnosis of multiple sclerosis and 12 127 patients with a main diagnosis of osteoarthritis, at first discharge from hospital or outpatient contact, were included. Patients with a diagnosis of multiple sclerosis had a 3.21 [95% confidence intervals (CI): 2.56-4.03] times increased rate of subsequently purchasing antidepressants compared with patients with a first diagnosis of osteoarthritis, and a 4.75 times (95% CI: 3.91-5.76) increased rate when compared with the rate among a gender-matched, age-matched, and calendar-matched sample of the general population. The rates were increased in all subgroups of patients regardless of gender, age, socioeconomic group, and time elapsed since diagnosis.
PubMed ID
18090509 View in PubMed
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Infections in childhood and adolescence in multiple sclerosis. A case-control study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature36485
Source
Neuroepidemiology. 1993;12(2):61-9
Publication Type
Article
Date
1993
Author
M. Grønning
T. Riise
G. Kvåle
G. Albrektsen
R. Midgard
H. Nyland
Author Affiliation
Department of Neurology, Haukeland University Hospital, Bergen, Norway.
Source
Neuroepidemiology. 1993;12(2):61-9
Date
1993
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Appendectomy - statistics & numerical data
Bronchitis - complications - epidemiology
Case-Control Studies
Child
Child, Preschool
Female
Humans
Infant
Infection - complications - epidemiology
Male
Measles - complications - epidemiology
Middle Aged
Multiple Sclerosis - complications - epidemiology
Norway - epidemiology
Odds Ratio
Pneumonia - complications - epidemiology
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Tonsillectomy - statistics & numerical data
Abstract
A case-control study on multiple sclerosis was conducted in Western Norway during the years 1986-1988. Included were 155 persons with multiple sclerosis and 200 controls, marginally matched according to age, sex and area of residence. The mean age at measles infection was for the cases 6.6 years and for the controls 5.7 years (p = 0.06). The cases had more frequently experienced bronchitis and/or pneumonia in the age group 11-15 years (OR = 3.20, 95% confidence interval 0.96-10.63). Tonsillectomies were reported more frequently by the cases. The odds ratio was especially high for those treated at age 0-6 years (OR = 3.44, 95% confidence interval 1.63-7.27). The results are consistent with the idea of MS as an age-dependent, host-immune response to infection during childhood or adolescence.
PubMed ID
8232705 View in PubMed
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Inverse comorbidity in multiple sclerosis: Findings in a complete nationwide cohort.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature280527
Source
Mult Scler Relat Disord. 2016 Nov;10:181-186
Publication Type
Article
Date
Nov-2016
Author
Anja Thormann
Nils Koch-Henriksen
Bjarne Laursen
Per Soelberg Sørensen
Melinda Magyari
Source
Mult Scler Relat Disord. 2016 Nov;10:181-186
Date
Nov-2016
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Aged
Case-Control Studies
Cohort Studies
Comorbidity
Denmark - epidemiology
Female
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Multiple Sclerosis - complications - epidemiology
Proportional Hazards Models
Registries
Young Adult
Abstract
Inverse comorbidity is disease occurring at lower rates than expected among persons with a given index disease. The objective was to identify inverse comorbidity in MS.
We performed a combined case-control and cohort study in a total nationwide cohort of cases with clinical onset of MS 1980-2005. We randomly matched each MS-case with five population controls. Comorbidity data were obtained from multiple, independent nationwide registries. Cases and controls were followed from January 1977 to the index date, and from the index date through December 2012. We controlled for false discovery rate and investigated each of eight pre-specified comorbidity categories: psychiatric, cerebrovascular, cardiovascular, lung, and autoimmune comorbidities, diabetes, cancer, and Parkinson's disease.
A total of 8947 MS-cases and 44,735 controls were eligible for inclusion. We found no inverse associations with MS before the index date. After the index date, we found a decreased occurrence of chronic lung disease (asthma and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease) (HR 0.80 (95% CI 0.75-0.86, p
PubMed ID
27919487 View in PubMed
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Multiple sclerosis and poliomyelitis. A Danish historical cohort study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature52464
Source
Acta Neurol Scand. 2000 Jun;101(6):384-7
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-2000
Author
N M Nielsen
J. Wohlfahrt
M. Melbye
S. Rasmussen
K. Mølbak
D S Askgaard
P. Aaby
Author Affiliation
Department of Epidemiology Research, Danish Epidemiology Science Centre, Statens Serum Institut, Copenhagen.
Source
Acta Neurol Scand. 2000 Jun;101(6):384-7
Date
Jun-2000
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Cohort Studies
Denmark
Female
Humans
Male
Multiple Sclerosis - complications - epidemiology - immunology
Poliomyelitis - complications - epidemiology - immunology
Poliovirus - immunology
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Risk factors
Abstract
OBJECTIVE: To evaluate whether persons with a history of poliomyelitis are at an increased risk of developing multiple sclerosis (MS). MATERIAL AND METHODS: All patients diagnosed with acute poliomyelitis in the greater capital area of Copenhagen, Denmark, between 1919 and 1954 were identified and followed with respect to MS. Information on vital status and diagnosis of sclerosis was obtained through linkage with the Danish Civil Registration System and The Danish Multiple Sclerosis Registry, respectively. Follow-up started on the date of the establishment of the Danish Civil Registration System (April 1, 1968) until death, emigration or December 31, 1996, whichever came first. The observed incidence of MS among polio patients was compared with the expected incidence calculated according to national gender, age and period specific rates of MS. RESULTS: During 149,364 years of follow-up, 19 cases of multiple sclerosis were observed among 5652 polio patients compared with 11.0 expected (SIR = 1.73 (1.04-2.74)). The increased risk of MS was most pronounced in polio patients hospitalized during adolescence. Neither gender nor the acute severity of poliomyelitis modified the risk of MS. CONCLUSION: Our results are based on small numbers of events, however the findings suggest that the polio patients might be at an increased risk of MS.
PubMed ID
10877154 View in PubMed
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20 records – page 1 of 2.