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Academic Achievement of University Students with Dyslexia.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature274081
Source
Dyslexia. 2015 Nov;21(4):338-49
Publication Type
Article
Date
Nov-2015
Author
Åke Olofsson
Karin Taube
Astrid Ahl
Source
Dyslexia. 2015 Nov;21(4):338-49
Date
Nov-2015
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Achievement
Adult
Computer-Assisted Instruction
Dyslexia - diagnosis - psychology
Education, Nursing
Education, Special
Female
Humans
Internet
Male
Multilingualism
Reading
Sweden
Teaching
Universities
Writing
Young Adult
Abstract
Broadened recruitment to higher education is on the agenda in many countries, and it is also widely recognized that the number of dyslexic students entering higher education is increasing. In Sweden, as in many other European countries, higher education institutions are required to accommodate students with dyslexia. The present study focuses on the study outcome for 50 students with diagnosed dyslexia, mainly in teacher education and nurses' training, at three universities in Northern Sweden. The students trusted their own ability to find information on the Internet but mistrusted their own abilities in reading course books and articles in English and in taking notes. The mean rate of study was 23.5 European Credit Transfer and Accumulation System credits per semester, which is slightly below the national baseline of 26.7. The results show that more than half of the students are examined at a normal rate of study but that about one fifth have a very low rate of study. Messages Most students with dyslexia can compensate for their reading problems. Taking notes during lessons and reading in foreign language may be especially difficult for students with dyslexia. Diagnoses should distinguish between reading comprehension and word decoding. More than half of the students with dyslexia can achieve at a normal rate of study. One-fifth of the students with dyslexia may need a longer period of study than other students.
PubMed ID
26459832 View in PubMed
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Accuracy, consensus, in-group bias, and cultural frame shifting in the context of national character stereotypes.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature104583
Source
J Soc Psychol. 2014 Jan-Feb;154(1):40-58
Publication Type
Article
Author
Jan-Erik Lönnqvist
Kenn Konstabel
Nellystiina Lönnqvist
Markku Verkasalo
Source
J Soc Psychol. 2014 Jan-Feb;154(1):40-58
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Character
Consensus
Cross-Cultural Comparison
Culture
Ethnic Groups
Female
Finland
Group Processes
Humans
Male
Multilingualism
Prejudice - psychology
Questionnaires
Reproducibility of Results
Stereotyping
Students - psychology
Sweden
Abstract
We examined Finns' and bilingual Swedish-Finns' stereotypes regarding personality differences between Finns and Swedish-Finns and compared them with their respective self-ratings. Stereotype ratings by both groups converged on depicting Swedish-Finns as having a more desirable personality. In-group bias also influenced stereotypes. Contrary to predictions based on the Stereotype Content Model, out-group stereotypes were not compensatory. Consistent with the kernel of truth hypothesis of national stereotypes, Swedish-Finns' aggregate self-ratings resembled their stereotype of personality differences between the two groups, and their personality self-ratings were more desirable than Finns' self-ratings. Tentatively suggesting the occurrence of cultural frame shifting, the resemblance between Swedish-Finns' self-ratings and their stereotype of Swedish-Finns was, although only marginally statistically significantly, somewhat stronger when the self-ratings were provided in Swedish.
PubMed ID
24689336 View in PubMed
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Adaptation and validation of the rheumatoid arthritis quality of life scale for use in Canada.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature193939
Source
J Rheumatol. 2001 Jul;28(7):1505-10
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jul-2001
Author
C. Neville
D. Whalley
S. McKenna
M. Le Comte
P R Fortin
Author Affiliation
Division of Clinical Epidemiology, McGill University Health Centre, Montreal, Quebec, Canada.
Source
J Rheumatol. 2001 Jul;28(7):1505-10
Date
Jul-2001
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Arthritis, Rheumatoid - psychology
Canada
Female
Health status
Health Surveys
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Multilingualism
Quality of Life
Reproducibility of Results
Abstract
The Rheumatoid Arthritis Quality of Life questionnaire (RAQoL) was developed simultaneously in the UK and the Netherlands to measure quality of life in patients with RA. We adapted and validated the RAQoL for the English-Canadian and French-Canadian languages and culture.
The UK RAQoL was translated into French-Canadian by a bilingual translation panel. Separate lay panels were then used to ensure that this and the English-Canadian instruments were appropriate for use with Canadian patients. Interviews were conducted with 15 French-Canadian and 15 English-Canadian patients with RA to determine the content validity. Reliability and construct validity were established by means of test-retest mail surveys conducted with 92 French-Canadian and 87 English-Canadian RA patients. The survey consisted of the adapted RAQoL, the Health Assessment Questionnaire (HAQ), and a demographic questionnaire.
The RAQoL was successfully adapted for both the French and English-Canadian cultures. Field testing showed both versions to be well received by respondents. Of the French-Canadian patients included in the postal survey, 52 responded at Time 1 and 50 at Time 2. For the English-Canadian sample, 54 responded at both time points. Missing data rates for the RAQoL were low and floor and ceiling effects were minimal. Test-retest reliability was good for both versions: 0.87 for the French-Canadian and 0.95 for the English-Canadian. Alpha coefficients (0.92 for the French-Canadian, 0.93 for the English-Canadian) showed the items to be adequately interrelated and scores on the measure showed moderate to high correlations with the HAQ, confirming construct validity. Both versions of the RAQoL were also able to distinguish patient groups that differed according to perceived health status and perceived severity of RA. In addition, the French-Canadian version was able to distinguish patients who rated today as bad or very bad from those who rated today as good or very good.
The new versions of the RAQoL were well received by both French and English speaking Canadians. The psychometric quality of the adapted questionnaires means they are suitable for inclusion in clinical trials involving patients with RA.
PubMed ID
11469454 View in PubMed
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The adaptation of an adult group screening test for dyslexia into Finland-Swedish: normative data for university students and the effects of language background on test performance.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature84750
Source
Scand J Psychol. 2007 Oct;48(5):419-32
Publication Type
Article
Date
Oct-2007
Author
Lindgrén Signe-Anita
Laine Matti
Author Affiliation
Abo Akademi University, Turku, Finland. signe-anita.lindgren@abo.fi
Source
Scand J Psychol. 2007 Oct;48(5):419-32
Date
Oct-2007
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Awareness
Cultural Characteristics
Dyslexia - diagnosis
Female
Finland
Health Surveys
Humans
Language
Male
Mass Screening - methods - statistics & numerical data
Memory
Multilingualism
Neuropsychological Tests - statistics & numerical data
Phonetics
ROC Curve
Self Disclosure
Students - psychology
Sweden
Task Performance and Analysis
Vocabulary
Abstract
We present a Finland-Swedish adaptation of the Sweden-Swedish group screening test for dyslexia for adults and young adults DUVAN (Lundberg & Wolff, 2003) together with normative data from 143 Finland-Swedish university students. The test is based on the widely held phonological deficit hypothesis of dyslexia and consists of a self-report and five subtests tapping phonological working memory, phonological representation, phonological awareness, and orthographic skill. We describe the test adaptation procedure and show that the internal reliability of the new test version is comparable to the original one. Our results indicate that the language background (Swedish, Finnish, early simultaneous Swedish-Finnish bilingualism) should be taken into account when interpreting the results on the Finland-Swedish DUVAN test. We show that the FS-DUVAN differentiates a group of students with dyslexia diagnosis from normals, and that a low performance on the FS-DUVAN correlates with a positive self-report on familial dyslexia and with a history of special education in school. Finally, we analyze the sensitivity and specificity of the FS-DUVAN for dyslexia among university students.
PubMed ID
17877557 View in PubMed
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American Society for Circumpolar Health. Comparison of mercury in selected subsistence foods from western Alaska.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature4462
Source
Int J Circumpolar Health. 2003 Dec;62(4):448
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-2003

An investigation of treatment scheduling for phonemic awareness with kindergartners who are at risk for reading difficulties.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature91731
Source
Lang Speech Hear Serv Sch. 2009 Jan;40(1):86-100
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jan-2009
Author
Ukrainetz Teresa A
Ross Catherine L
Harm Heide M
Author Affiliation
Division of Communication Disorders, University of Wyoming, Department 3311, 1000 East University Avenue, Laramie, WY 82071-3311, USA. tukraine@uwyo.edu
Source
Lang Speech Hear Serv Sch. 2009 Jan;40(1):86-100
Date
Jan-2009
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Analysis of Variance
Child
Child, Preschool
Dyslexia
Female
Humans
Language Tests
Language Therapy - methods
Learning
Male
Multilingualism
Phonetics
Reading
Risk factors
Socioeconomic Factors
Teaching - methods
Abstract
PURPOSE: This study examined 2 schedules of treatment for phonemic awareness. METHOD: Forty-one 5- to 6-year-old kindergartners, including 22 English learners, with low letter-name and first-sound knowledge received 11 hr of phonemic awareness treatment: concentrated (CP, 3x/wk to December), dispersed (DP, 1x/wk to March), and dispersed vocabulary control (CON). RESULTS: English learners performed similarly to native English speakers. Participants with moderate deficits in letter-names and first sounds showed significant benefits after both treatment conditions. Three times the intensity had no additional effect on phonemic awareness. CP continued to increase significantly during the no-treatment interval. In March, CP and DP were significantly greater than CON, but the 2 conditions did not differ other than with a minor DP advantage on last sounds. By May, there were no significant differences among the 3 conditions in meeting grade-level expectations for phoneme segmenting. CONCLUSION: For phonemic awareness, over the course of a school year, with concomitant classroom instruction, the gains made from short, intense treatment were similar to those made from continuous weekly treatment. At-risk kindergartners with moderate deficits benefited more than those with mild deficits. Children, particularly those with mild deficits, may improve substantially with only classroom instruction and incidental self-regulatory gains from treatment for another area.
PubMed ID
18840674 View in PubMed
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Arranging and negotiating the use of informal interpreters in general practice consultations: experiences of refugees and asylum seekers in the west of Ireland.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature150233
Source
Soc Sci Med. 2009 Jul;69(2):210-4
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jul-2009
Author
Anne MacFarlane
Zhanna Dzebisova
Dmitri Karapish
Bosiljka Kovacevic
Florence Ogbebor
Ekaterina Okonkwo
Author Affiliation
National University of Ireland, Galway, Ireland. anne.macfarlane@nuigalway.ie
Source
Soc Sci Med. 2009 Jul;69(2):210-4
Date
Jul-2009
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Communication Barriers
Family Practice
Female
Health Services Accessibility
Humans
Interviews as Topic
Ireland
Male
Multilingualism
Physician-Patient Relations
Refugees
Russia - ethnology
Serbia - ethnology
Social Support
Abstract
This paper focuses on the work involved for service users in arranging and negotiating the use of informal interpreters from their social networks for general practice consultations. The data are drawn from a participatory learning and action research study, carried out in the west of Ireland. Qualitative data were gathered using a peer researcher model from a 'hard to reach' community of Serbo-Croat and Russian refugees and asylum seekers (n=26). The findings elucidate that there is a tension for service users between the experienced benefits of having a trusted friend/family member present to act as their interpreter and the burden of work and responsibility to manage the language barrier. Participants emphasize that, for them, the use of informal interpreters can be inadequate and problematic and can leave them worried, frustrated and with experiences of error and misdiagnosis. Overall, they state a clear preference for the use of professional, trained interpreters in general practice consultations which is currently unavailable to them in routine Irish general practice consultations.
PubMed ID
19535192 View in PubMed
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Beliefs about causes of colon cancer by English-as-a-Second-Language Chinese immigrant women to Canada.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature132620
Source
J Cancer Educ. 2011 Dec;26(4):734-9
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-2011
Author
Jennifer Elizabeth McWhirter
Laura E Todd
Laurie Hoffman-Goetz
Author Affiliation
Department of Health Studies and Gerontology, Faculty of Applied Health Sciences, University of Waterloo, Waterloo, ON, Canada, N2L 3G1.
Source
J Cancer Educ. 2011 Dec;26(4):734-9
Date
Dec-2011
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aged
Asian Continental Ancestry Group
Canada
Colonic Neoplasms - diagnosis - etiology - psychology
Communication Barriers
Culture
Early Detection of Cancer - psychology - utilization
Emigrants and Immigrants - psychology
Female
Health Knowledge, Attitudes, Practice
Health Literacy
Humans
Language
Middle Aged
Multilingualism
Risk factors
Abstract
Colon cancer is the second leading cause of cancer death for Canadians. Immigrants underutilize screening and may be at greater risk of late stage diagnosis and death from the disease. This mixed-methods study investigated the self-reported causes of colon cancer by 66 English-as-a-Second-Language Chinese immigrant women to Canada after reading a fact sheet which listed two causes of colon cancer (polyps and cause unknown) and six ways to help prevent colon cancer (lifestyle, diet, weight, smoking, alcohol, and screening). Women correctly named or described both causes (6.1%) or one cause (22.7%), could not name or describe either cause (19.7%), or named or described causes not included on the fact sheet (54.5%). The most common causes reported by participants were "risk factors": diet (53.0%), family history (28.8%), and lifestyle (22.7%). Women confused cause with risk factor and infrequently mentioned screening. Possible reasons for their reported beliefs are discussed.
PubMed ID
21800045 View in PubMed
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Bilingual effects on cognitive and linguistic development: role of language, cultural background, and education.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature127230
Source
Child Dev. 2012 Mar-Apr;83(2):413-22
Publication Type
Article
Author
Raluca Barac
Ellen Bialystok
Author Affiliation
York University, Toronto, ON, Canada.
Source
Child Dev. 2012 Mar-Apr;83(2):413-22
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Attention
Child
Color Perception
Cross-Cultural Comparison
Discrimination (Psychology)
Educational Status
Executive Function
Female
Humans
Language Development
Male
Multilingualism
Neuropsychological Tests - statistics & numerical data
Ontario
Pattern Recognition, Visual
Psychometrics
Psychomotor Performance
Reaction Time
Reversal Learning
Verbal Learning
Vocabulary
Abstract
A total of 104 six-year-old children belonging to 4 groups (English monolinguals, Chinese-English bilinguals, French-English bilinguals, Spanish-English bilinguals) were compared on 3 verbal tasks and 1 nonverbal executive control task to examine the generality of the bilingual effects on development. Bilingual groups differed in degree of similarity between languages, cultural background, and language of schooling. On the executive control task, all bilingual groups performed similarly and exceeded monolinguals; on the language tasks the best performance was achieved by bilingual children whose language of instruction was the same as the language of testing and whose languages had more overlap. Thus, executive control outcomes for bilingual children are general but performance on verbal tasks is specific to factors in the bilingual experience.
Notes
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PubMed ID
22313034 View in PubMed
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Bilingualism and performance on two widely used developmental neuropsychological test batteries.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature269568
Source
PLoS One. 2015;10(4):e0125867
Publication Type
Article
Date
2015
Author
Linda C Karlsson
Anna Soveri
Pekka Räsänen
Antti Kärnä
Sonia Delatte
Emma Lagerström
Lena Mård
Mikaela Steffansson
Minna Lehtonen
Matti Laine
Source
PLoS One. 2015;10(4):e0125867
Date
2015
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Child
Cognition - physiology
Female
Finland
Humans
Intelligence Tests
Male
Multilingualism
Neuropsychological Tests
Sweden
Wechsler Scales
Abstract
The present study investigated the effect of bilingualism on the two widely used developmental neuropsychological test batteries Wechsler Intelligence Scale for Children - Fourth Edition (WISC-IV) and A Developmental Neuropsychological Assessment, Second Edition (NEPSY-II) in children. The sample consisted of 100 Finland-Swedish children in two age groups. About half (n = 52) of the participants were early simultaneous bilinguals, and the other half (n = 48) were monolinguals. As no Finland-Swedish versions of the tests are available at the moment, both tests were translated and adapted to suit this population. The results revealed no difference in the performance between bilingual and monolingual children. This speaks against a cognitive advantage in bilingual children and indicates that development of separate norms for monolingual and bilingual children is not needed for clinical use.
Notes
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PubMed ID
25922937 View in PubMed
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106 records – page 1 of 11.