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Clinical description of children with developmental coordination disorder.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature195505
Source
Can J Occup Ther. 2001 Feb;68(1):5-15
Publication Type
Article
Date
Feb-2001
Author
L T Miller
C A Missiuna
J J Macnab
T. Malloy-Miller
H J Polatajko
Author Affiliation
School of Occupational Therapy, Faculty of Health Sciences, University of Western Ontario, London, Ontario, N6G 1H1. lmiller@julian.uwo.ca
Source
Can J Occup Ther. 2001 Feb;68(1):5-15
Date
Feb-2001
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Child
Child, Preschool
Developmental Disabilities - diagnosis - epidemiology - rehabilitation
Female
Humans
Male
Movement Disorders - diagnosis - epidemiology - rehabilitation
Occupational therapy
Ontario - epidemiology
Prospective Studies
Psychomotor Performance
Referral and Consultation
Retrospective Studies
Abstract
Occupational therapists working within School Health Support Services are receiving increasing numbers of referrals, relative to past rates, for children who are experiencing motor problems and may have developmental coordination disorder. Based upon clinical experience, therapists indicate that these children are typically referred in the early school years and that most have handwriting difficulties; to date, however, there has been little empirical evidence to support these observations. In this paper, descriptive information is presented for 556 children who may be presumed to have developmental coordination disorder and who had been referred to school-based health services in two centres. Typical reasons for referral, co-morbidity information, and assessment practices are presented. Findings confirmed the presence of many occupational performance issues in this population, including handwriting difficulties, and challenge therapists to broaden the current scope of school health assessment and intervention practices.
PubMed ID
11233688 View in PubMed
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Dyskinetic cerebral palsy. I. Clinical categories, associated neurological abnormalities and incidences.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature40414
Source
Acta Paediatr Scand. 1982 Jul;71(4):543-50
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jul-1982
Author
M. Kyllerman
B. Bager
J. Bensch
B. Bille
I. Olow
H. Voss
Source
Acta Paediatr Scand. 1982 Jul;71(4):543-50
Date
Jul-1982
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Aphasia - diagnosis
Birth weight
Cerebral Palsy - diagnosis - epidemiology - genetics
Child
Child, Preschool
Diseases in Twins - epidemiology
Dystonia - diagnosis
Female
Gestational Age
Humans
Infant
Intelligence Tests
Male
Movement Disorders - diagnosis - epidemiology - genetics
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Retrospective Studies
Sweden
Syndrome
Abstract
An unselected series of 116 dyskinetic cerebral palsy cases born 1959-70 was delineated and subgrouped according to neurological criteria into 35 hyperkinetic (30%) and 81 dystonic (70%) cases. Of the hyperkinetics, 80% had a mild motor disability, while 90% of the dystonics had moderate or severe disability. Subordinated spastic signs were found in 9% of the hyperkinetic and in 44% of the dystonic cases. IQ was greater than 90 in 69% of the hyperkinetics and 25% of the dystonics and less than 50 in 11% and 41%, respectively. Two or more additional neurological abnormalities (spasticity, mental retardation, epilepsy, anarthria, dysarthria, hearing deficit) were detected in 46% hyperkinetic and 81% dystonic cases. A heavy multihandicap complex was present predominantly in the dystonic subgroup. The 5-19 year mortality rate was 6% and was confined to the most severely handicapped dystonic cases. The twin rate was 5%. A total of 9% had birth weights less than or equal to 1500 g, and 31% had less than or equal to 2500 g. The weight- and age-specific incidences increased rapidly with decreasing birth weights and gestational ages. The crude incidence of hyperkinetic cerebral palsy was 0.07 and dystonic cerebral palsy 0.17 per thousand live births.
PubMed ID
7136669 View in PubMed
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Low bone mass in patients with motor disability: prevalence and risk factors in 59 Finnish children.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature148906
Source
Dev Med Child Neurol. 2010 Mar;52(3):276-82
Publication Type
Article
Date
Mar-2010
Author
Päivi Kilpinen-Loisa
Taava Paasio
Martti Soiva
Ulla Maija Ritanen
Pentti Lautala
Petri Palmu
Helena Pihko
Outi Mäkitie
Author Affiliation
Department of Paediatric Neurology, Päijät-Häme Central Hospital, Lahti, Finland. paivi.kilpinen-loisa@phsotey.fi
Source
Dev Med Child Neurol. 2010 Mar;52(3):276-82
Date
Mar-2010
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Absorptiometry, Photon - instrumentation
Bone Density - physiology
Bone Diseases - epidemiology - physiopathology - radiography
Child
Cohort Studies
Cross-Sectional Studies
Disability Evaluation
Female
Finland - epidemiology
Fractures, Bone - epidemiology - radiography
Humans
Hypercalciuria - epidemiology
Male
Movement Disorders - diagnosis - epidemiology - physiopathology
Osteoporosis - diagnosis
Predictive value of tests
Prevalence
Risk factors
Vitamin D Deficiency - epidemiology
Abstract
Children with motor disabilities are at increased risk of compromised bone health. This study evaluated prevalence and risk factors of low bone mass and fractures in these children.
This cross-sectional cohort study evaluated bone health in 59 children (38 males, 21 females; median age 10 y 11 mo) with motor disability (Gross Motor Function Classification System levels II-V). Bone mineral density (BMD) in the lumbar spine was measured with dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry; BMD values were corrected for bone size (bone mineral apparent density [BMAD]) and skeletal maturity, and compared with normative data. Spinal radiographs were obtained to assess vertebral morphology. Blood biochemistry included vitamin D concentration and other parameters of calcium homeostasis.
Ten children (17%) had sustained in total 14 peripheral fractures; lower-limb fractures predominated. Compression fractures were present in 25%. The median spinal BMAD z-score was -1.0 (range -5.0 to 2.0); it was -0.6 in those without fractures and -1.7 in those with fractures (p=0.004). Vitamin D insufficiency was present in 59% of participants (serum 25-hydroxyvitamin D
PubMed ID
19709135 View in PubMed
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Physical activity restrictions for children after the Fontan operation: disagreement between parent, cardiologist, and medical record reports.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature151459
Source
Am Heart J. 2009 May;157(5):853-9
Publication Type
Article
Date
May-2009
Author
Patricia E Longmuir
Brian W McCrindle
Author Affiliation
Hospital for Sick Children and Faculty of Medicine, University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario, Canada.
Source
Am Heart J. 2009 May;157(5):853-9
Date
May-2009
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Child
Cross-Sectional Studies
Dissent and Disputes
Female
Follow-Up Studies
Fontan Procedure - adverse effects
Heart Defects, Congenital - physiopathology - surgery
Humans
Male
Medical Records
Motor Activity - physiology
Movement Disorders - diagnosis - epidemiology - etiology
Ontario - epidemiology
Physician-Patient Relations
Postoperative Complications
Prevalence
Questionnaires
Abstract
Physical activity is important for the health of children after the Fontan procedure. Parents uncertain about physical activity have children who are more sedentary. To understand parent uncertainty, we examined agreement regarding activity restrictions from parents, cardiologists, and medical charts.
Activity restriction information for 64 children (25 female), 6 to 11 years, with a Fontan circulation was obtained via cardiologist and parent questionnaire. Each child's medical chart was reviewed for relevant physical activity information. kappa Statistics calculated agreement between sources beyond chance.
Cardiologist, parent, and medical chart reports of the child's activity restrictions often disagree. Regardless of the cardiologist reported restrictions, 70% of parents reported that their child's activity was restricted (kappa = 0.04, P = .25). Parents and cardiologists report the same body contact restrictions (kappa = 0.16) but differ for exertion and competition (kappa
PubMed ID
19376311 View in PubMed
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Prevalence of movement disorders in elderly community residents.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature219267
Source
Neuroepidemiology. 1994;13(4):175-8
Publication Type
Article
Date
1994
Author
S. Moghal
A H Rajput
C. D'Arcy
R. Rajput
Author Affiliation
Department of Medicine, University of Saskatchewan, Saskatoon, Canada.
Source
Neuroepidemiology. 1994;13(4):175-8
Date
1994
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Community Medicine
Female
Humans
Male
Movement Disorders - diagnosis - epidemiology
Parkinson Disease - diagnosis - epidemiology
Prevalence
Risk factors
Saskatchewan - epidemiology
Tremor - diagnosis - epidemiology
Abstract
We studied movement disorders (MD) in community residents of Saskatchewan aged > or = 65 years. A representative sample of 70 individuals had detailed neurological evaluation. Those who had definite and possible MD at first examination had a second neurological assessment by a senior neurologist. The most prevalent MD was essential tremor (ET) (14%) followed by Parkinson's disease (PD) (3%). The marked difference in prevalence ratios for PD and ET are attributed to: (a) higher incidence of ET in the general population; (b) a greater possibility that most, if not all, ET cases would reside in the community whereas a sizable proportion of elderly PD cases may be institutionalized, and (c) shortened survival in PD but a normal life expectancy in ET.
PubMed ID
8090259 View in PubMed
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Self-reported and test-based mobility limitations in a representative sample of Finns aged 30+.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature168223
Source
Scand J Public Health. 2006;34(4):378-86
Publication Type
Article
Date
2006
Author
Päivi Sainio
Seppo Koskinen
Markku Heliövaara
Tuija Martelin
Tommi Härkänen
Heikki Hurri
Seppo Miilunpalo
Arpo Aromaa
Author Affiliation
National Public Health Institute, Department of Health and Functional Capacity, Helsinki, Finland. paivi.sainio@ktl.fi
Source
Scand J Public Health. 2006;34(4):378-86
Date
2006
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Activities of Daily Living
Adult
Age Factors
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Disability Evaluation
Female
Finland - epidemiology
Health Surveys
Humans
Interviews as Topic
Male
Middle Aged
Motor Activity
Movement Disorders - diagnosis - epidemiology - prevention & control
Questionnaires
Self Concept
Sex Factors
Task Performance and Analysis
Walking
Abstract
The object of the present study was to acquire a comprehensive and accurate picture of mobility limitations in the Finnish adult population.
A nationally representative sample of 8,028 persons aged 30+ with high participation was interviewed and examined in the Health 2000 Survey conducted in 2000-01. Mobility limitations were measured by self-reports and performance tests.
Perceived running difficulties were already common among persons in middle age, while difficulties in moving about indoors were frequent only among persons aged 75+. A third of women and a fifth of men aged 55+ could not reach a walking speed of 1.2 m/s. Working-aged women were more limited than men only in physically demanding tasks, but in the elderly the gender difference was evident in most mobility tasks. A substantial disagreement was found between the self-reported and test-based indicators in stair climbing. Supplementary data collection, carried out to increase participation in the health examination, as well as inclusion of institutionalized persons, provided a more complete estimate of the prevalence of mobility limitations among the elderly.
Both self-reported and performance-based indicators are needed to achieve a comprehensive view of disability and its variation between population groups. Exclusion of institutionalized persons and low participation lead to underestimation of the occurrence of limitations. The number of persons suffering from mobility problems will increase with ageing of the population, which accentuates the importance of early intervention to maintain functional ability, especially in women.
PubMed ID
16861188 View in PubMed
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[The genetics of movement disorders--spinocerebellar degenerations].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature178496
Source
Tidsskr Nor Laegeforen. 2004 Sep 9;124(17):2233-5
Publication Type
Article
Date
Sep-9-2004
Author
Chantal M E Tallaksen
Espen Dietrichs
Author Affiliation
Nevrologisk avdeling, Ullevål universitetssykehus, 0407 Oslo. chantal.tallaksen@ulleval.no
Source
Tidsskr Nor Laegeforen. 2004 Sep 9;124(17):2233-5
Date
Sep-9-2004
Language
Norwegian
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Genotype
Humans
Movement Disorders - diagnosis - epidemiology - genetics - therapy
Norway - epidemiology
Paraparesis, Spastic - diagnosis - epidemiology - genetics - therapy
Phenotype
Spinocerebellar Degenerations - diagnosis - epidemiology - genetics - therapy
Abstract
Hereditary movement disorders include spinocerebellar disorders, a large and heterogeneous group of syndromes with ataxia or spasticity as the prominent symptom. In spite of the vast clinical and genetic heterogeneity, patterns of pathogenesis slowly emerge and help us understand these disorders.
This review is based on personal experience and recent literature.
More than 20 types of hereditary spastic paraparesis have been reported. Dominant SPG4 and SPG3 with mutations in the spastin or the atlastin gene have been identified in many countries. The most prevalent type of recessive ataxia in Europe, Friedreich's ataxia, has become a model of integrated clinical-molecular-therapeutic research. More recessive ataxias (AOA1-2) have been described recently. More than 20 autosomal dominant ataxias have been reported, with 12 identified genes including the episodic ataxias, and 9 mapped. SCA7 appears to be the most frequent type in some Nordic countries.
A striking feature of many of these diseases is the involvement of very different genes for similar phenotypes. Conversely, very heterogeneous phenotypes are due to single-gene defects. Recently there has been considerable progress in the clinical description of movement disorders and the understanding of their genetic basis. Possible therapies are emerging.
PubMed ID
15356686 View in PubMed
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7 records – page 1 of 1.