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119 records – page 1 of 12.

The 6-Minute Walk Test as a Predictor of Summit Success on Denali.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature279175
Source
Wilderness Environ Med. 2016 Mar;27(1):19-24
Publication Type
Article
Date
Mar-2016
Author
Katherine M Shea
Eric R Ladd
Grant S Lipman
Patrick Bagley
Elizabeth A Pirrotta
Hurnan Vongsachang
N Ewen Wang
Paul S Auerbach
Source
Wilderness Environ Med. 2016 Mar;27(1):19-24
Date
Mar-2016
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Aged
Alaska
Female
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Mountaineering - statistics & numerical data
Prospective Studies
Walk Test - methods
Young Adult
Abstract
To test whether the 6-minute walk test (6MWT), including postexercise vital sign measurements and distance walked, predicts summit success on Denali, AK.
This was a prospective observational study of healthy volunteers between the ages of 18 and 65 years who had been at 4267 m for less than 24 hours on Denali. Physiologic measurements were made after the 6MWT. Subjects then attempted to summit at their own pace and, at the time of descent, completed a Lake Louise Acute Mountain Sickness Questionnaire and reported maximum elevation reached.
One hundred twenty-one participants enrolled in the study. Data were collected on 111 subjects (92% response rate), of whom 60% summited. On univariate analysis, there was no association between any postexercise vital sign and summit success. Specifically, there was no significant difference in the mean postexercise peripheral oxygen saturation (Spo2) between summiters (75%) and nonsummiters (74%; 95% CI, -3 to 1; P = .37). The distance a subject walked in 6 minutes (6MWTD) was longer in summiters (617 m) compared with nonsummiters (560 m; 95% CI, 7.6 to 106; P = .02). However, this significance was not maintained on a multivariate analysis performed to control for age, sex, and guide status (P = .08), leading to the conclusion that 6MWTD was not a robust predictor of summit success.
This study did not show a correlation between postexercise oxygen saturation or 6MWTD and summit success on Denali.
PubMed ID
26712335 View in PubMed
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7 summits : a nurse's quest to conquer mountaineering and life

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature293564
Source
Sudberry, MA. Jones and Bartlett
Publication Type
Book/Book Chapter
Date
2010
Author
Hickey, Patrick
Source
Sudberry, MA. Jones and Bartlett
Date
2010
Language
English
Geographic Location
U.S.
Publication Type
Book/Book Chapter
Physical Holding
University of Alaska Anchorage
Keywords
Nurses -- Biography -- United States
Mountaineers
Autobiography
Motivation
Notes
RT 37 .H32 A3 2010
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Source
Wilderness Environ Med. 2003;14(1):39-43
Publication Type
Article
Date
2003
Author
Paul B Crews
Source
Wilderness Environ Med. 2003;14(1):39-43
Date
2003
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Accidental Falls
Alaska
History, 20th Century
Humans
Mountaineering - history
Rescue Work - history
Notes
Comment In: Wilderness Environ Med. 2003 Spring;14(1):33-812659247
PubMed ID
12659248 View in PubMed
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[Adaptation capabilities of polar explorers in Antarctic mountains].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature300693
Source
Kosmicheskaia Biologiia i Aviakosmicheskaia Meditsina. 1987 Nov-Dec;21(6):62-6.
Publication Type
Article
Date
1987
Author
Aidaraliev AA
Maksimov AL
Chernook TB
Source
Kosmicheskaia Biologiia i Aviakosmicheskaia Meditsina. 1987 Nov-Dec;21(6):62-6.
Date
1987
Language
Russian
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adaptation, Physiological
Antarctic Regions
Circadian Rhythm
Expeditions
Humans
Hypoxia/physiopathology
Mountaineering
Seasons
Abstract
The examinations were carried out during the 27th Soviet Antarctic expedition. Baseline data were collected before the departure of the test subjects to the Antarctic Region. Prior to their ascent to the high mountain area they were divided into two groups with a high and a low level of hypoxic tolerance in terms of the work capacity index calculated on the basis of standard bicycle ergometry tests. Heart rate, body temperature and salivary content of sodium and potassium were measured 6 times a day at 4-hour intervals. The results obtained were treated by nonparametric tests. It was found that on adaptation day 30 the subjects with low hypoxic tolerance and nonspecific resistance developed changes in biorhythm amplitudes and phases and showed ultradian components with a 12-hour period. By contrast, the subjects with high hypoxic tolerance retained the ability to maintain circadian patterns. By the middle of the wintering time the circadian rhythms shifted towards ultradian components regardless of individual hypoxic tolerance.
PubMed ID
3437743 View in PubMed
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Alaska nutrition survey report: Diet report on four villages -- Unalakleet, White Mountain, Kotzebue and Selawik April 15, 1947 to June 28, 1947

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature1083
Source
Alaska (Ter.) Dept. of Health, Juneau, AK. 82 pp.
Publication Type
Article
Date
[1947?]
  1 document  
Author
Heller, CA
Author Affiliation
Alaska Territorial Department of Health
Source
Alaska (Ter.) Dept. of Health, Juneau, AK. 82 pp.
Date
[1947?]
Language
English
Geographic Location
U.S.
Publication Type
Article
Digital File Format
Text - PDF
Physical Holding
Alaska Medical Library
Keywords
Alaska
Alaska Native
Calcium
Calories
Diet
Eskimo
Foods
Iron
Kotzebue
Nutrition
Protein
Selawik
Unalakleet
Vitamins
White Mountain
Notes
From: Fortuine, Robert et al. 1993. The Health of the Inuit of North America: A Bibliography from the Earliest Times through 1990. University of Alaska Anchorage. Citation number 1139.
Cited in: Fortuine, Robert. 1968. The Health of the Eskimos: a bibliography 1857-1967. Dartmouth College Libraries. Citation number 230.
Documents

AlaskaNutritionSurveyReport.pdf

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Source
Journal of the Maine Medical Association. 62 (6):139-141.
Publication Type
Article
Date
1971
Author
Stiles, M.H.
Source
Journal of the Maine Medical Association. 62 (6):139-141.
Date
1971
Language
English
Geographic Location
U.S.
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Blood oxygen saturation
Pulmonary Edema
Mountain sickness
Abstract
Though skiing, except for low altitude, is characteristically a mountain actvitiy, altitude is rarely a problem. The physiological principles involved are simple, though a detailed explanation may seem somewhat complex.
Notes
Available upon request at the Alaska Medical Library, located in UAA/APU Consortium Library. Ask for accession no. 312324.
PubMed ID
5580830 View in PubMed
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Ambulatory physiological status monitoring during a mountaineering expedition.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature196200
Source
Mil Med. 2000 Nov;165(11):860-6
Publication Type
Article
Date
Nov-2000
Author
L A Sonna
J E Kain
R W Hoyt
S R Muza
M N Sawka
Author Affiliation
Thermal and Mountain Medicine Division, U.S. Army Research Institute of Environmental Medicine, Natick, MA 01760, USA.
Source
Mil Med. 2000 Nov;165(11):860-6
Date
Nov-2000
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Altitude Sickness - diagnosis
Body temperature
Canada
Humans
Military Personnel
Monitoring, Physiologic
Mountaineering - physiology
Oximetry
Questionnaires
United States
Abstract
To evaluate an ambulatory physiological monitoring system during a mountaineering expedition. We hypothesized that the Environmental Symptoms Questionnaire, combined with frequent measurement of oxygen saturation and core temperature, would accurately identify cases of environmental illness.
Twelve military mountaineers took a daily Environmental Symptoms Questionnaire, monitored fingertip oxygen saturations, and recorded core temperatures while climbing a 4,949-m peak. Illnesses identified by the system were compared with those identified by spontaneous reports.
The system correctly identified one case of high-altitude pulmonary edema and two illnesses that were not reported to the physician (one case of acute mountain sickness and one of self-limited symptomatic desaturation). However, it did not identify two illnesses that were severe enough to preclude further climbing (one case of sinus headache and one of generalized fatigue).
Our monitoring system may complement, but cannot replace, on-site medical personnel during mountaineering expeditions.
PubMed ID
11143435 View in PubMed
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[Analysis of accidental deaths in mountain tourism and sport according to statistics from the Republic of Kabardino-Balkariia].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature167673
Source
Sud Med Ekspert. 2006 Jul-Aug;49(4):10-4
Publication Type
Article
Author
A M Mechukaev
A A Mechukaev
Source
Sud Med Ekspert. 2006 Jul-Aug;49(4):10-4
Language
Russian
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Accidents - mortality
Adult
Algorithms
Cause of Death
Female
Forensic Medicine
Humans
Male
Mortality - trends
Mountaineering
Russia
Seasons
Abstract
Lethal cases in mountain tourism and sports in the Republic of Kabardino-Balkaria were studied for 1978-1995. A total of 152 accidental deaths were analysed. Most of the victims were males under 30 years of age. The greatest number of the accidents took place on Monday, in July and August. Many amateur visitors from abroad were among the victims. The main cause of death in the mountains of Kabardino-Balkaria for the 18 years studied was multitrauma of the body (69.7%). Hypothermia and obturation asphyxia with snow and compression asphyxia due to snowbreak account for 11.8 and 13.2% deaths, respectively; lightning killed 4%. Combination of high mountain hypoxia with exacerbated chronic somatic disease or hypothermia caused death in 1% victims. The authors propose how to improve forensic-medical expert examination of accidental death and safety in the mountains.
PubMed ID
16944690 View in PubMed
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Arctic and alpine biodiversity : patterns, causes, and ecosystem consequences.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature300818
Source
Berlin ; New York : Springer-Verlag. 332 pages.
Publication Type
Book/Book Chapter
Date
1995
Author
Chapin, F. Stuart, III
Korner, Christian
Source
Berlin ; New York : Springer-Verlag. 332 pages.
Date
1995
Language
English
Publication Type
Book/Book Chapter
Physical Holding
University of Alaska Anchorage
University of Alaska Fairbanks
Keywords
Arctic Regions
Congresses
Biotic communities
Mountain ecology
Biodiversity
Botany
Ecosystem
Altitude
Nature conservation
Protection
Cold zones
Zoology
Notes
Ecological studies ;vol. 113
Based on papers from a workshop held in Kongsvold, Norway, Aug. 17-20, 1993.
Contents: Patterns and causes of arctic plant community diversity / M.D. Walker -- Causes of arctic plant diversity : origin and evolution / D.F. Murray -- Patterns and causes of genetic diversity in arctic plants / J.B. McGraw -- Alpine plant diversity : a global survey and functional interpretations / Ch. Ko¨rner -- Origin and evolution of the mountain flora in Middle Asia and neighbouring mountain regions / O. Agakhanjanz and S.-W. Breckle -- Diversity of the Arctic terrestrial fauna / Yu. I. Chernov -- Animal diversity at high altitudes in the Austrian central Alps / E. Meyer and K. Thaler -- Arctic tundra biodiversity : a temporal perspective from late Quaternary pollen records / L.B. Brubaker, P.M. Anderson, and F.S. Hu -- Effects of mammals on ecosystem change at the Pleistocene-Holocene boundary / S.A. Zimov [and others] -- Palaeorecords of plant biodiversity in the Alps / B. Ammann -- Implications for changes in arctic plant biodiversity from environmental manipulation experiments / T.V. Callaghan and S. Jonasson -- Patterns and current changes in alpine plant diversity / G. Grabherr [and others] -- Anthropogenic impacts on biodiversity in the Arctic / O.R. Young and F.S. Chapin III -- Plant functional diversity and resource control of primary production in Alaskan Arctic tundras / G.R. Shaver -- Direct and indirect effects of plant species on biogeochemical processes in arctic ecosystems / S.E. Hobbie -- Causes and consequences of plant functional diversity in arctic ecosystems / F.S. Chapin III [and others] -- Ecosystem consequences of microbial diversity and community structure / J. Schimel -- Diversity of biomass and nitrogen distribution among plant species in arctic and alpine tundra ecosystems / J. Pastor -- The plant-vertebrate herbivore interface in arctic ecosystems / R.L. Jefferies and J.P. Bryant -- Insect diversity, life history, and trophic dynamics in arctic streams, with particular emphasis on black flies (Diptera: Simuliidae) / A.E. Hershey, R.W. Merritt, and M.C. Miller -- Land-water interactions : the influence of terrestrial diversity on aquatic ecosystems / G.W. Kling -- Patterns, causes, changes, and consequences of biodiversity in arctic and alpine ecosystems / F.S. Chapin III and Ch. Ko¨rner.
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119 records – page 1 of 12.