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A 10-week strength training program: effect on the motor performance of an unimpaired upper extremity.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature50029
Source
Arch Phys Med Rehabil. 1998 Aug;79(8):925-30
Publication Type
Article
Date
Aug-1998
Author
K J Kauranen
P T Siira
H V Vanharanta
Author Affiliation
Department of Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation, Oulu University Central Hospital, Finland.
Source
Arch Phys Med Rehabil. 1998 Aug;79(8):925-30
Date
Aug-1998
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Arm - physiology
Electromyography
Exercise Therapy - methods
Female
Hand Strength - physiology
Humans
Middle Aged
Motor Skills - physiology
Movement - physiology
Weight Lifting
Abstract
OBJECTIVE: Muscle strength training is one of the most common therapy methods in physical therapy programs, and the usual goal of this treatment is to improve muscle strength. Little attention has been paid, however, to the effects of strength training on the other components of motor performance. This study examined the effects of a 10-week strength training program on the motor performance of the hand, including reaction time, speed of movement, tapping speed, and coordination in normal healthy volunteers. DESIGN: Before-after trial. SUBJECTS AND SETTING: Sixteen healthy women volunteers aged 25 to 45 years participated. INTERVENTION: Subjects accomplished a 10-week muscle strength training program of the upper extremities. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES: Reaction time, speed of movement, tapping speed, and coordination were measured three times on consecutive days, and muscle strength and electromyographic values of the right upper extremity were recorded once before the training period. After the training period, the same measurements were made as before the training. RESULTS: The 10-week strength training decreased choice reaction time by 6% (p
PubMed ID
9710164 View in PubMed
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Adolescents' school-related self-concept mediates motor skills and psychosocial well-being.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature104309
Source
Br J Educ Psychol. 2014 Jun;84(Pt 2):268-80
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-2014
Author
Helena Viholainen
Tuija Aro
Jarno Purtsi
Asko Tolvanen
Marja Cantell
Author Affiliation
Special Education Unit, Department of Education, University of Jyväskylä, Finland.
Source
Br J Educ Psychol. 2014 Jun;84(Pt 2):268-80
Date
Jun-2014
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adaptation, Psychological - physiology
Adolescent
Adolescent Behavior - psychology
Child
Cohort Studies
Female
Finland
Humans
Mathematics
Mental Health - statistics & numerical data
Motor Skills - physiology
Peer Group
Personal Satisfaction
Questionnaires
Reading
Self Concept
Self Report
Social Behavior
Abstract
The health benefits of exercise participation and physical activity for mental health and psychosocial well-being (PSWB) have been shown in several studies. However, one important background factor, that is, motor skills (MSs), has largely been ignored. In addition, most of the existing research focuses on poor MSs, that is, poor MSs are often connected to poorer PSWB. The mechanism linking MSs and PSWB is unclear. However, a preliminary suggestion has been made that self-worth or self-perceptions might mediate the association between MSs and PSWB.
We investigated whether the self-concepts (SCs) of school-related physical education (SCPE), reading (SCR), and mathematics (SCM) mediate the relationship between MSs and PSWB in adolescence.
The study sample consisted of a second-grade female cohort (N = 327), ranging in age between 12 and 16 (years) in a municipality in Central Finland. PSWB was measured by the Strengths and Difficulties Questionnaire and the school-related SCs by the SC of ability scale adapted for use in Finland. MSs was assessed by a self-reported adolescent version of the Developmental Coordination Disorder Questionnaire. Structural mediator modelling was used to test the associations between MSs and PSWB with SC as a mediator.
First, MSs was strongly associated with school-related SCPE and SCM. However, a mediator role was observed only for SCPE, which weakly mediated peer problems. Second, MSs and PSWB, especially conduct problems, showed a very strong direct association.
The study suggests that MSs is connected to PSWB in adolescent girls. Enhancement of MSs could be a preventive strategy for supporting PSWB in adolescent girls.
PubMed ID
24829120 View in PubMed
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Are skilled players at greater risk of injury in female youth football?

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature139565
Source
Br J Sports Med. 2010 Dec;44(15):1118-23
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-2010
Author
Torbjørn Soligard
Hege Grindem
Roald Bahr
Thor Einar Andersen
Author Affiliation
Oslo Sports Trauma Research Center, Norwegian School of Sport Sciences, Ullevaal Stadion, Oslo, Norway. torbjorn.soligard@nih.no
Source
Br J Sports Med. 2010 Dec;44(15):1118-23
Date
Dec-2010
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Athletic Injuries - epidemiology - etiology
Female
Humans
Incidence
Motor Skills - physiology
Norway - epidemiology
Questionnaires
Retrospective Studies
Risk factors
Soccer - injuries
Abstract
Knowledge of skill-related risk factors for injury in football is limited.
To investigate whether there is an association between football skills and risk of injury in football.
Prospective cohort study of the incidence of injuries and a retrospective evaluation of the players' skill-level.
Exposure and injuries were registered prospectively in 82 of 125 football teams (1665 of 2540 female Norwegian amateur players aged 13-17 years) throughout one football season (March-October 2007). A standardised questionnaire designed to assess the football skills of each player was completed by the coaches after the season.
Across the different skill attributes, the injury incidence in the high-skilled players varied from 4.4 to 4.9 injuries per 1000 player hours, compared to 2.8 to 4.0 injuries per 1000 player hours in the low-skilled players. Players skilled at ball receiving, passing and shooting, heading, tackling, decision-making when in ball possession or in defence and physically strong players were at significantly greater risk of sustaining any injury, an acute injury and a contact injury than their less skilled teammates (rate ratio: 1.50-3.19, all p
PubMed ID
21047836 View in PubMed
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Baby swimming: exploring the effects of early intervention on subsequent motor abilities.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature148818
Source
Child Care Health Dev. 2010 May;36(3):428-30
Publication Type
Article
Date
May-2010
Author
H. Sigmundsson
B. Hopkins
Author Affiliation
Department of Psychology, Norwegian University of Science and Technology, Trondheim, Norway. hermundurs@svt.ntnu.no
Source
Child Care Health Dev. 2010 May;36(3):428-30
Date
May-2010
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Child Development - physiology
Child, Preschool
Female
Humans
Iceland
Male
Motor Skills - physiology
Postural Balance - physiology
Questionnaires
Swimming - physiology
Abstract
The aim of the study was to explore the effects of baby swimming on subsequent motor abilities.
A range of motor abilities was examined in 4-year-old children who had previously participated in a programme of baby swimming (n= 19) and compared with a matched group of coevals who had not had this experience (n= 19).
As predicted from the nature of the exercises that comprise the programme, the effects of baby swimming were restricted to abilities associated with prehension and balance.
Suggestions are made as to how the theme of this hypothesis-generating, demonstration study can be pursued in the future with more rigorous experimental controls and applications to children with disabilities and impairments.
PubMed ID
19719766 View in PubMed
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Behavioral biomarkers of aging: illustration of a multivariate approach for detecting age-related behavioral changes.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature52508
Source
J Gerontol A Biol Sci Med Sci. 1999 Dec;54(12):B549-66
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-1999
Author
A L Markowska
S J Breckler
Author Affiliation
Department of Psychology, Johns Hopkins University, Baltimore, MD 21218, USA. Alicja@jhu.edu
Source
J Gerontol A Biol Sci Med Sci. 1999 Dec;54(12):B549-66
Date
Dec-1999
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Age Factors
Aging - genetics - psychology
Animals
Behavior, Animal - physiology
Diet
Discrimination Learning - physiology
Female
Genotype
Male
Memory - physiology
Motor Skills - physiology
Multivariate Analysis
Psychomotor Performance - physiology
Rats
Rats, Inbred BN
Rats, Inbred F344
Rats, Inbred Strains
Reproducibility of Results
Research Support, U.S. Gov't, P.H.S.
Sensitivity and specificity
Sex Factors
Swimming - physiology
Abstract
The goal of the current project is to develop a multivariate statistical strategy for the formation of behavioral indices of performance and, further, to apply this strategy to establish the relationship between age and important characteristics of performance. The strategy was to begin with a large set of measures that span a broad range of behaviors. The behavioral effects of the following variables were examined: Age (4, 12, 24, and 30 months), genotype [Fischer 344 and a hybrid (F1) of Fischer 344 and Brown Norway (F344xBN)], gender (Fischer 344 males and Fischer 344 females), long-term diet (ad lib diet or dietary restriction beginning at 4 months of age), and short-term diet (ad lib diet or dietary restriction during testing). The behavioral measures were grouped into conceptually related indicators. The indicators within a set were submitted to a principal component analysis to help identify the summary indices of performance, which were formed with the assumption that these component scores would offer more reliable and valid measures of relevant aspects of behavioral performance than would individual measures taken alone. In summary, this approach has made a number of important contributions. It has provided sensitive and selective measures of performance that indicated contributions of all variables: psychological process, age, genotype, gender, long-term and short-term diet and has increased the sensitivity of behavioral measures to age-related behavioral impairment. It has also improved task-manageability by decreasing the number of meaningful variables without losing important information, consequently providing a simplification of the pattern of changes.
PubMed ID
10647964 View in PubMed
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Beneficial effects of a polyunsaturated fatty acid on infant development: evidence from the inuit of arctic Quebec.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature93597
Source
J Pediatr. 2008 Mar;152(3):356-64
Publication Type
Article
Date
Mar-2008
Author
Jacobson Joseph L
Jacobson Sandra W
Muckle Gina
Kaplan-Estrin Melissa
Ayotte Pierre
Dewailly Eric
Author Affiliation
Department of Psychiatry and Behavioral Neurosciences, Wayne State University School of Medicine, Detroit, Michigan, USA.
Source
J Pediatr. 2008 Mar;152(3):356-64
Date
Mar-2008
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Biological Markers - blood
Birth weight
Child Development - physiology
Cognition - physiology
Cohort Studies
Docosahexaenoic Acids - blood
Fatty Acids, Unsaturated - blood
Female
Fetal Blood - chemistry
Follow-Up Studies
Gestational Age
Humans
Infant
Infant, Newborn
Inuits
Male
Milk, human - chemistry
Motor Skills - physiology
Multivariate Analysis
Pregnancy
Probability
Quebec
Regression Analysis
Sensitivity and specificity
Time Factors
Visual Acuity - physiology
Abstract
OBJECTIVES: To examine the relation of cord plasma docosahexaenoic acid (DHA) concentration to gestation length, birth size, growth, and infant visual acuity, cognitive, and motor development and the effects on growth and development associated with DHA intake from breast-feeding. STUDY DESIGN: DHA, other polyunsaturated fatty acids, and 3 environmental contaminants (polychlorinated biphenyls, mercury, and lead) were assessed in cord plasma and maternal plasma and milk in 109 Inuit infants in Arctic Quebec. Multiple regression was used to examine the relation of cord DHA and DHA from breast-feeding on growth and development at 6 and 11 months, after controlling for contaminant exposure and other potential confounders. RESULTS: Higher cord DHA concentration was associated with longer gestation, better visual acuity and novelty preference on the Fagan Test at 6 months, and better Bayley Scale mental and psychomotor performance at 11 months. By contrast, DHA from breast-feeding was not related to any indicator of cognitive or motor development in this full-term sample. CONCLUSIONS: The association of higher cord DHA concentration with more optimal visual, cognitive, and motor development is consistent with the need for substantial increases in this critically important fatty acid during the third trimester spurt of synaptogenesis in brain and photoreceptor development.
PubMed ID
18280840 View in PubMed
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Bilateral spastic cerebral palsy--a comparative study between south-west Germany and western Sweden. I: Clinical patterns and disabilities.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature36045
Source
Dev Med Child Neurol. 1993 Dec;35(12):1037-47
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-1993
Author
I. Krägeloh-Mann
G. Hagberg
C. Meisner
B. Schelp
G. Haas
K E Eeg-Olofsson
H K Selbmann
B. Hagberg
R. Michaelis
Author Affiliation
Eberhard-Karls-Universität Tübingen, Abteilung Entwicklungsnerologie, Germany.
Source
Dev Med Child Neurol. 1993 Dec;35(12):1037-47
Date
Dec-1993
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Cerebral Palsy - complications - epidemiology - physiopathology
Child
Child, Preschool
Comparative Study
Epilepsy - epidemiology - etiology
Germany - epidemiology
Hearing Loss - epidemiology - etiology
Humans
Incidence
Infant, Low Birth Weight
Infant, Newborn
Mental Competency
Motor Skills - physiology
Muscle Spasticity
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Sweden - epidemiology
Vision Disorders - epidemiology - etiology
Abstract
The results of a collaborative study of bilateral spastic cerebral palsy (BSCP) between south-west Germany and western Sweden are reported, comprising 249 children in south-west Germany and 264 children in western Sweden. A severe gross motor disability was present in 65 per cent of the German and 62 per cent of the Swedish children; learning difficulties or mental retardation in 73 and 76 per cent; active epilepsy in 28 and 26 per cent; and severe visual disability in 20 and 19 per cent, respectively. Severe disabilities were especially pronounced in children with normal birthweights, in whom the most severe subtypes of BSCP were also found. Leg-dominated BSCP was the predominant subtype among low-birthweight children, but also occurred in more than half of the normal-birthweight children. The authors conclude that the two series were comparable, and that reliable results between countries can be obtained if clear-cut classifications and definitions are used.
PubMed ID
8253285 View in PubMed
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Caries among children with cerebral palsy: relation to CP-diagnosis, mental and motor handicap.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature37633
Source
ASDC J Dent Child. 1990 Jul-Aug;57(4):267-73
Publication Type
Article
Author
L A Nielsen
Author Affiliation
Department of Pediatric Dentistry, Royal Dental College, Copenhagen, Denmark.
Source
ASDC J Dent Child. 1990 Jul-Aug;57(4):267-73
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Cerebral Palsy - diagnosis - physiopathology
Comparative Study
DMF Index
Denmark - epidemiology
Dental Care for Disabled
Dental Caries - epidemiology
Female
Humans
Male
Mental Retardation - classification
Motor Skills - physiology
Paralysis - classification
Public Health Dentistry
Regression Analysis
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Speech - physiology
Abstract
A total of 105 children with cerebral palsy, born in eastern Denmark in 1968 or 1969, comprised the group studied here. They were classified by CP-diagnosis, motor handicap, mental handicap, speech, caries, with dental data statistically analyzed. The caries rate of the combined CP-group was significantly lower than that of the control group.
PubMed ID
2142695 View in PubMed
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Changes in motor performance in persons with Parkinson's disease after exercise in a mountain area.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature50069
Source
J Neurosci Nurs. 1997 Aug;29(4):255-60
Publication Type
Article
Date
Aug-1997
Author
H. Sunvisson
J. Lökk
K. Ericson
B. Winblad
S L Ekman
Author Affiliation
Centre of Caring Sciences, Huddinge University Hospital, Sweden. Helena.Sunvisson@cvvp07.hs.sll.se
Source
J Neurosci Nurs. 1997 Aug;29(4):255-60
Date
Aug-1997
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aged
Antiparkinson Agents - therapeutic use
Combined Modality Therapy
Female
Humans
Locomotion - physiology
Male
Middle Aged
Motor Skills - physiology
Mountaineering - physiology
Neurologic Examination
Parkinson Disease - physiopathology - rehabilitation
Patient care team
Physical Fitness - physiology
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Sweden
Treatment Outcome
Walking - physiology
Abstract
For one week in autumn, over a period of three consecutive years, a total of 12 persons with Parkinson's disease (PD) participated in daily walks of about 4 kilometers in a mountain area in Sweden in order to train rhythm, balance and coordination on the soft heaths. These persons were 60-78 years of age and had been found to be between stage 1 and stage 3 on the Hoehn and Yahr Staging Scale. The aim of the study was to find out whether a week of daily walks in the Swedish mountains would affect the motor performance of persons with PD, objectively and quantitatively assessed by a computer-assisted, opto-electronic movement analysis program, the Posturo-Locomotor-Manual (PLM) test. As compared with those before the journey, the results showed improved motor performance both immediately after the walking week and also at 3 but not 6 months later. The first year of participation showed the most pronounced improvements. The results demonstrate a long-lasting improvement in decreased movement time, indicating enhanced general motor performance and also an improved simultaneous index (SI), indicating a possible effect on the central nervous system. These findings, along with participants' narratives about what they did after returning home, may be indicative of strengthened self-confidence.
PubMed ID
9307929 View in PubMed
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84 records – page 1 of 9.