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1473 records – page 1 of 148.

7 summits : a nurse's quest to conquer mountaineering and life

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature293564
Source
Sudberry, MA. Jones and Bartlett
Publication Type
Book/Book Chapter
Date
2010
Author
Hickey, Patrick
Source
Sudberry, MA. Jones and Bartlett
Date
2010
Language
English
Geographic Location
U.S.
Publication Type
Book/Book Chapter
Physical Holding
University of Alaska Anchorage
Keywords
Nurses -- Biography -- United States
Mountaineers
Autobiography
Motivation
Notes
RT 37 .H32 A3 2010
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Source
Dimens Health Serv. 1988 Feb;65(1):10-1, 14
Publication Type
Article
Date
Feb-1988
Author
A M Malek
Author Affiliation
University of Alberta, Edmonton.
Source
Dimens Health Serv. 1988 Feb;65(1):10-1, 14
Date
Feb-1988
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Absenteeism
Alberta
Hospital Bed Capacity, 100 to 299
Hospitals, Pediatric
Humans
Motivation
Nursing Staff, Hospital - psychology
Seasons
Stress, Physiological
PubMed ID
3342947 View in PubMed
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Abstinence, occasional drinking and binge drinking in middle-aged women. The Women's Health in Lund Area (WHILA) Study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature92823
Source
Nord J Psychiatry. 2008;62(3):186-91
Publication Type
Article
Date
2008
Author
Rundberg Jenny
Lidfeldt Jonas
Nerbrand Christina
Samsioe Göran
Romelsjö Anders
Ojehagen Agneta
Author Affiliation
Department of Clinical Sciences, Lund-Psychiatry, USIL, Lund UniversityHospital, Kioskgatan 19, 221 85 Lund, Sweden. jenny.rundberg@med.lu.se
Source
Nord J Psychiatry. 2008;62(3):186-91
Date
2008
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adaptation, Psychological
Alcohol Drinking - adverse effects - epidemiology - psychology
Alcoholic Intoxication - epidemiology - psychology
Cross-Sectional Studies
Female
Health Status Indicators
Health Surveys
Humans
Middle Aged
Motivation
Social Environment
Social Security - statistics & numerical data
Socioeconomic Factors
Stress, Psychological - complications
Sweden
Temperance - psychology - statistics & numerical data
Abstract
Although drinking patterns in women have received increased attention, few studies have focused on middle-aged women. Drinking patterns were investigated in a population sample of 513 Swedish women aged 50-59, and analysed in relation to social situation, and mental and physical health. The chi-square test was used to analyse differences in proportions. Variables showing significant differences were entered into a multivariate or multinomial logistic regression model. Abstainers and occasional drinkers had lower levels of education and more often regular medical control compared with weekly drinkers. Furthermore, abstainers more often had disability pension. Among women drinking alcohol, 56.6% affirmed binge drinking within the last year and 39.4% within the last month. Binge drinkers did not differ in terms of social situation, mental or physical health, compared with other drinkers. Drinking to relieve tension was affirmed by 7.2%. These women had more mental symptoms and less contact with friends compared with other drinkers; furthermore, they were more often binge drinkers. Binge drinking was common and health and social consequences of this drinking pattern in middle-aged women need to be further explored. Women drinking to relieve tension may need intervention for both drinking habits and mental health.
PubMed ID
18609026 View in PubMed
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The acceptability of physical activity programming within a smoking cessation service for individuals with severe mental illness.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature165975
Source
Patient Educ Couns. 2007 Apr;66(1):123-6
Publication Type
Article
Date
Apr-2007
Author
Guy Faulkner
Adrian Taylor
Shelly Munro
Peter Selby
Chris Gee
Author Affiliation
Faculty of Physical Education and Health, University of Toronto, Toronto, Canada. guy.faulkner@utoronto.ca
Source
Patient Educ Couns. 2007 Apr;66(1):123-6
Date
Apr-2007
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Decision Making
Depressive Disorder - epidemiology - psychology - rehabilitation
Exercise Therapy
Female
Health Services Accessibility
Health services needs and demand
Humans
Life Style
Male
Middle Aged
Motivation
Nursing Methodology Research
Ontario - epidemiology
Patient Acceptance of Health Care - psychology
Prevalence
Questionnaires
Risk Reduction Behavior
Schizophrenia - epidemiology - rehabilitation
Schizophrenic Psychology
Self Concept
Severity of Illness Index
Smoking - epidemiology - prevention & control - psychology
Smoking Cessation - psychology
Social Support
Abstract
There is a high prevalence of smoking and physical inactivity among individuals with severe mental illness (SMI). The current study assessed the acceptability of introducing physical activity, including perceived advantages and disadvantages, as an adjunct to a smoking cessation service within this population.
109 participants with SMI who were receiving smoking cessation treatment completed a survey assessing perceived interest in physical activity and a 24-item decisional balance questionnaire reflecting potential advantages and disadvantages of becoming more physically active.
The majority of the participants reported being interested in assistance in becoming more active [63% (69/109)]. The highest rated advantages reported were 'It would improve my health or reduce my risk of disease' and 'It would improve how I feel about myself'. Cost, and being active by oneself were the most frequently reported barriers.
This study suggests that many individuals with SMI seeking treatment for smoking cessation may also be receptive to assistance in becoming more physically active. Such individuals endorse both advantages and disadvantages more frequently than those not interested.
This study provides preliminary support for the acceptability of adding physical activity as a smoking cessation strategy with SMI individuals. Addressing salient barriers will be critical to integrating physical activity within this smoking cessation service.
PubMed ID
17184957 View in PubMed
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Acceptance of cosmetic surgery, body appreciation, body ideal internalization, and fashion blog reading among late adolescents in Sweden.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature108577
Source
Body Image. 2013 Sep;10(4):632-5
Publication Type
Article
Date
Sep-2013
Author
Carolina Lunde
Author Affiliation
Department of Psychology, University of Gothenburg, Gothenburg, Sweden. Electronic address: carolina.lunde@psy.gu.se.
Source
Body Image. 2013 Sep;10(4):632-5
Date
Sep-2013
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adolescent Behavior - psychology
Blogging
Body Image - psychology
Body mass index
Female
Humans
Internal-External Control
Male
Mass Media
Motivation - physiology
Personal Satisfaction
Sex Distribution
Social Values
Surgery, Plastic - psychology
Sweden
Thinness - psychology
Abstract
This study examined adolescents' attitudes of cosmetic surgery, as well as the relationships between these attitudes, body appreciation, body ideal internalization, and fashion blog reading. The sample comprised 110 (60 boys, 50 girls) late adolescents (mean age 16.9 years) from a Swedish high school. The results indicated that younger adolescents seem somewhat more accepting of cosmetic surgery. This was especially the case for boys' acceptance of social motives for obtaining cosmetic surgery (boys' M=2.3±1.55 vs. girls' M=1.7±0.89). Girls', and to a limited extent boys', internalization of the thin ideal was related to more favorable cosmetic surgery attitudes. Athletic ideal internalization and body appreciation were unrelated to these attitudes. Finally, girls who frequently read fashion blogs reported higher thin ideal internalization, and also demonstrated a slight tendency of more cosmetic surgery consideration.
PubMed ID
23871282 View in PubMed
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Acceptance of the smoking cessation intervention in a large population-based study: the Inter99 study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature67180
Source
Scand J Public Health. 2005;33(2):138-45
Publication Type
Article
Date
2005
Author
Charlotta Pisinger
Jørgen Vestbo
Knut Borch-Johnsen
Troels Thomsen
Torben Jørgensen
Author Affiliation
Research Centre for Prevention and Health, Nordre Ringvej, Glostrup University Hospital, Glostrup, Denmark. chpi@glostruphosp.kbhamt.dk
Source
Scand J Public Health. 2005;33(2):138-45
Date
2005
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Attitude to Health
Denmark
Female
Humans
Life Style
Male
Middle Aged
Motivation
Questionnaires
Smoking Cessation - psychology
Socioeconomic Factors
Abstract
AIMS: Potential exists for improving the impact of quit-smoking programmes, by recruiting smokers in early motivational stages, by using active recruitment strategies, and by offering professional assistance to quit. METHODS: This was a randomized population-based intervention study, in Copenhagen, Denmark. A total of 2,408 daily smokers in all motivational stages were included. All participants completed a questionnaire, and underwent a health examination and a lifestyle consultation. Smokers in the high-intensity intervention were offered assistance to quit smoking in smoking cessation groups. RESULTS: Before the lifestyle consultation only 11% of the smokers stated that they planned to quit within one month. After the lifestyle consultation 27% accepted smoking cessation in groups and an additional 12% planned to quit without assistance. Of the smokers who accepted smoking cessation groups 23% had not been planning to quit before the lifestyle consultation. Being a woman, having high tobacco consumption, having a long smoking history, having tried to quit within the previous year, and having a higher motivation to quit predicted participation in smoking cessation groups. CONCLUSIONS: It was possible to recruit a large number of smokers in early motivational stages by using active recruitment strategies and by offering assistance to quit. Lifestyle consultations markedly increased the number of smokers willing to try to quit. Smokers preferred assistance to quit in a smoking cessation group to quitting on their own; therefore, it is important to improve recruitment strategies for smoking cessation programmes.
PubMed ID
15823975 View in PubMed
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Accessing health services through the back door: a qualitative interview study investigating reasons why people participate in health research in Canada.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature257231
Source
BMC Med Ethics. 2013;14:40
Publication Type
Article
Date
2013
Author
Anne Townsend
Susan M Cox
Author Affiliation
Department of Occupational Science and Occupational Therapy, University of British Columbia, Wesbrook Mall, Vancouver, BC V6T 2B5, Canada. atownsen@exchange.ubc.ca.
Source
BMC Med Ethics. 2013;14:40
Date
2013
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Altruism
Biomedical research
British Columbia
Communication
Comprehension
Female
Health Services Accessibility
Humans
Interviews as Topic
Male
Manitoba
Middle Aged
Motivation
Patient Selection
Qualitative Research
Questionnaires
Research Subjects - psychology
Therapeutic Misconception
Abstract
Although there is extensive information about why people participate in clinical trials, studies are largely based on quantitative evidence and typically focus on single conditions. Over the last decade investigations into why people volunteer for health research have become increasingly prominent across diverse research settings, offering variable based explanations of participation patterns driven primarily by recruitment concerns. Therapeutic misconception and altruism have emerged as predominant themes in this literature on motivations to participate in health research. This paper contributes to more recent qualitative approaches to understanding how and why people come to participate in various types of health research. We focus on the experience of participating and the meanings research participation has for people within the context of their lives and their health and illness biographies.
This is a qualitative exploratory study informed by grounded theory strategies. Thirty-nine participants recruited in British Columbia and Manitoba, Canada, who had taken part in a diverse range of health research studies participated in semi-structured interviews. Participants described their experiences of health research participation including motivations for volunteering. Interviews were recorded, transcribed, and analyzed using constant comparisons. Coding and data management was supported by Nvivo-7.
A predominant theme to emerge was 'participation in health research to access health services.' Participants described research as ways of accessing: (1) Medications that offered (hope of) relief; (2) better care; (3) technologies for monitoring health or illness. Participants perceived standard medical care to be a "trial and error" process akin to research, which further blurred the boundaries between research and treatment.
Our findings have implications for recruitment, informed consent, and the dichotomizing of medical/health procedures as either research or treatment. Those with low health status may be more vulnerable to potential coercion, suggesting the need for a more cautious approach to obtaining consent. Our findings also indicate the need for boundary work in order to better differentiate treatment and research. It is important however to acknowledge a categorical ambiguity; it is not always the case that people are misinformed about the possible benefits of research procedures (i.e., therapeutic misconception); our participants were aware that the primary purpose of research is to gain new knowledge yet they also identified a range of actual health benefits arising from their participation.
Notes
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PubMed ID
24119203 View in PubMed
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Access to the world after myocardial infarction: experiences of the recovery process.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature70416
Source
Rehabil Nurs. 2006 Mar-Apr;31(2):63-8; discussion 69
Publication Type
Article
Author
Cathrine Hildingh
Bengt Fridlund
Evy Lidell
Author Affiliation
School of Social and Health Sciences, Halmstad University, Sweden. hildingh@hos.hh.se
Source
Rehabil Nurs. 2006 Mar-Apr;31(2):63-8; discussion 69
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Activities of Daily Living
Adaptation, Psychological
Aged
Attitude to Health
Family - psychology
Fear
Female
Health Knowledge, Attitudes, Practice
Humans
Life Change Events
Life Style
Male
Middle Aged
Motivation
Myocardial Infarction - psychology - rehabilitation
Nurse's Role
Nursing Methodology Research
Qualitative Research
Questionnaires
Recovery of Function
Rehabilitation Nursing - organization & administration
Self Care - methods - psychology
Self Efficacy
Social Support
Sweden
Abstract
Myocardial infarction (MI) is a traumatic health event and at the same time a transition of vital importance in human life. The purpose of this study was to elucidate recovery patterns after myocardial infarction with regard to the content of patients' experiences. The study used a descriptive design and a qualitative method. Interviews with 16 men and women were performed, and data were subjected to a thematic content analysis. The recovery process had a pattern of ability, restraints, and reorientation. Through self-help and help from others, the mutual sharing of burdens, and clarifying restraints to recovery, the recovery process progressed toward reorientation. New values and motivation for change, as well as a new balance within the self and relationships were found. The MI had been integrated into life and, through the recovery process, patients' attitudes were better focused, leading to an enhanced quality of life.
PubMed ID
16526524 View in PubMed
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1473 records – page 1 of 148.